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New Exhibition-The Ruskin Library

Date: 5 July 2010

New exhibition

Mountain Glory: Ruskin's 'Modern Painters' and the Swiss Alps.

The fifth and final volume of Ruskin's Modern Painters, his magisterial book of art history focusing on J.M.W. Turner and landscape painting, was published in 1860. Like The Stones of Venice, it was largely illustrated with engravings after Ruskin's own drawings and watercolours. To mark the 150th anniversary, some of these will be shown along with other related works, concentrating on the Swiss Alps.

The new exhibition will open on the 11th July and run until the 26th September.

All are welcome and entrance is free. Gallery opening times are Monday-Saturday 11am-4pm and Sunday 1pm-4pm. Why not spend a lunch hour or an afternoon in the Swiss Alps viewing these magnificent mountains through the eyes of John Ruskin and Victorian artists and explorers?

For further information, please go to:

The home of the Whitehouse Collection of Ruskin materials, the Ruskin Library contains a Reading Room, for those using the Collection for research, and a Gallery, open to the public seven days a week, which shows a selection of works from the collection. The award-winning building, designed by Sir Richard MacCormac (of MJP Architects) and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, was designed to especially house the collection and was opened by HRH Princess Alexandra in 1998.

The collection is a fascinating mixture of pictures, books, manuscripts and photographs relating to the great Victorian writer and artist John Ruskin (1819-1900) who spent his later life at Brantwood, near Coniston in the Lake District. At least three themed displays are arranged each year: these are mainly of works from the collection, but many also include items lent by other institutions and occasional exhibitions of more modern works.


Further information

Associated staff: Lauren Kenwright, Andrew Tate, Stephen Wildman

Associated departments and research centres: Ruskin Research Centre