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Cover Letters

Cover letters give you the opportunity to show your enthusiasm and suitability for an opportunity.

The Careers Portal has learning pathways / resources to help you build your Cover Letter:

Cover Letter types:

Standard

Your cover letter should entice employers to read your CV and show how well you express yourself

With this in mind you need to make sure that you don't just repeat your CV or give rambling explanations. Instead use your cover letter to focus on your skills and experience, saving your qualifications for your CV. You should double check what you’ve written as spelling mistakes or lack of attention to detail will put your cover letter straight on the no pile.

Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

 

Speculative

In highly competitive industries not all jobs are advertised, a speculative application helps you to proactively find these roles

In the opening paragraph explain what sort of role you’re looking for. Then move on to show you’ve done your research by explaining why you’re attracted to the company. Next you need to talk about the skills and experience you have gained that are relevant to the company and the role. It’s best to show that you’re an all-rounder so don’t restrict yourself by focusing on one skill or area. Finally, you should end on a positive note.

Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

 

Masters Degree

This is your chance to explain what your Masters degree has taught you and how it will help with the job you're applying for

Employers don't always distinguish between a Masters and Bachelors degree when recruiting. They may value the additional maturity, but it’s up to you to explain in your cover letter what skills and knowledge you have gained through this higher qualification.

Present yourself in terms of the extra abilities you have and how this relates to your career goals. A Masters also needs to be complemented by relevant work experience, so make sure you mention any details of this.

Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

 

No Experience

If you haven't got any directly related work experience then you'll need to think of other ways to sell yourself in your cover letter First of all you could talk about your degree, listing any relevant modules, and say what you learned that will help you in this job.

Next mention any part-time jobs you've had and the skills you've gained. While it may not always seem relevant to the job you're applying for it will show employers that you have some knowledge of the working world.

You can also use your graduate cover letter to mention any clubs and societies you're part of or any hobbies you have. Explain what's involved and the skills you've learned. This will show employers that there's more to you than just your qualifications.

Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

 

Explaining a CV gap

You must always explain any large gaps in your CV and your cover letter is the place to do so

This is so a potential employer doesn’t misinterpret a break in your career history. If you approach it positively, it shouldn't be an issue.

Reasons for gaps in your CV include:

  • going on a gap year
  • having children
  • caring for a sick relative
  • suffering from a recurring medical condition
  • redundancy.

You should talk about the gap in the third or fourth paragraph explaining what you did and the skills you've learned. Finish by demonstrating your enthusiasm for the position and add that you’re now ready to focus on your career.

Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

 

  • Standard

    Standard

    Your cover letter should entice employers to read your CV and show how well you express yourself

    With this in mind you need to make sure that you don't just repeat your CV or give rambling explanations. Instead use your cover letter to focus on your skills and experience, saving your qualifications for your CV. You should double check what you’ve written as spelling mistakes or lack of attention to detail will put your cover letter straight on the no pile.

    Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

    This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

     

  • Speculative

    Speculative

    In highly competitive industries not all jobs are advertised, a speculative application helps you to proactively find these roles

    In the opening paragraph explain what sort of role you’re looking for. Then move on to show you’ve done your research by explaining why you’re attracted to the company. Next you need to talk about the skills and experience you have gained that are relevant to the company and the role. It’s best to show that you’re an all-rounder so don’t restrict yourself by focusing on one skill or area. Finally, you should end on a positive note.

    Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

    This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

     

  • Masters Degree

    Masters Degree

    This is your chance to explain what your Masters degree has taught you and how it will help with the job you're applying for

    Employers don't always distinguish between a Masters and Bachelors degree when recruiting. They may value the additional maturity, but it’s up to you to explain in your cover letter what skills and knowledge you have gained through this higher qualification.

    Present yourself in terms of the extra abilities you have and how this relates to your career goals. A Masters also needs to be complemented by relevant work experience, so make sure you mention any details of this.

    Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

    This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

     

  • No Experience

    No Experience

    If you haven't got any directly related work experience then you'll need to think of other ways to sell yourself in your cover letter First of all you could talk about your degree, listing any relevant modules, and say what you learned that will help you in this job.

    Next mention any part-time jobs you've had and the skills you've gained. While it may not always seem relevant to the job you're applying for it will show employers that you have some knowledge of the working world.

    You can also use your graduate cover letter to mention any clubs and societies you're part of or any hobbies you have. Explain what's involved and the skills you've learned. This will show employers that there's more to you than just your qualifications.

    Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

    This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

     

  • Explaining a CV gap

    Explaining a CV gap

    You must always explain any large gaps in your CV and your cover letter is the place to do so

    This is so a potential employer doesn’t misinterpret a break in your career history. If you approach it positively, it shouldn't be an issue.

    Reasons for gaps in your CV include:

    • going on a gap year
    • having children
    • caring for a sick relative
    • suffering from a recurring medical condition
    • redundancy.

    You should talk about the gap in the third or fourth paragraph explaining what you did and the skills you've learned. Finish by demonstrating your enthusiasm for the position and add that you’re now ready to focus on your career.

    Many employers still expect a cover letter with a CV, so the wise job-seeker should know how to create a cover letter that will grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and make them want to read the accompanying CV or application.

    This learning path explains how to plan, write and follow up on your cover letter.

     

Get your Cover Letter reviewed / checked

Come along to a drop-in session and we will support you with checking your Cover Letters. Drop-ins run from:

  • Morning: 10:00 - 12:00 Monday to Friday during term time 
  • Afternoons: 14:00 - 16:00 Monday to Friday during term time

Location: The Base

Outside of term time drop-in sessions will be limited depending on demand.