CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ARTIFICIAL OPTICAL RADIATION INCLUDING LASERS

Lasers

The purpose of this policy is to maintain and improve existing standards of health and safety in relation to work with laser equipment.

Introduction

This guidance covers the safety management requirements for the use of hazardous artificial radiation sources.

Part 1 deals with lasers and part 2 with other sources of hazardous artificial light/radiation such as those generating infra-red (IR) and ultra violet (UV) light.

Hazardous effects include damage to eyesight, skin burns and the early onset of cataracts. If you are unsure if light sources you manage or use may be hazardous, information is given on this in the Health and Safety Executive guidance reproduced in part 2.

Detailed advice on all matters relating to hazardous artificial light can be obtained from the current University Laser Safety Adviser, Dr Robert Young who is based in the Physics Department.

Part 1

SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE USE OF LASERS

Part 2

SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS FOR USE OF NON LASER HAZARDOUS ARTIFICIAL LIGHT SOURCES

Some forms of intense artificial light can be harmful to those exposed unless protective measures are taken. Examples of hazardous artificial light sources other than lasers include: The above is not an exhaustive list but covers the main equipment types likely to be in use by the University.

If you are unsure as to whether a light source is hazardous the supplier has a legal duty to provide this information.

The supplier must also provide information as to how the risk can be managed.

The link below takes you to a copy of the Health and Safety Executive guidance on the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010.

This document will help you identify whether a light source is hazardous and enable you to inform a risk assessment to develop a safe system of work.

If you are not sure whether a light source is hazardous the first point of contact is the manufacturer who has a legal duty to provide this information and how any risk can be managed.

The University's 5 step approach to risk assessment is detailed under the general risk assessment guidance in the A - Z. This includes the record form that should be used to record the outcome of your assessment.

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Lancaster University
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