Continuous Personal Development and Short Courses

We offer a range of modules that can be taken as Continuous Professional Development courses.

These programmes are popular with Masters students wishing to focus on specialised areas of engineering or have extra commitments. You will receive one full week of intensive teaching in any of the modules below.

When you’ve found an area of interest, please contact our admissions team to discuss fees and to reserve your application.

  • ENGR501: Design and Modelling of Systems

    Aim

    The purpose is to educate students about the importance of a structured approach to system and product design. The module will cover a design approach from the user requirement capture to detailing and which will require the student to develop skills in mathematical modelling. The students will also be exposed to leading Computer Aided Conceptual Design (CACD) software tools.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should be able to:

    • Appreciate the need for a systems view of design
    • Use requirements capture methods in the context of system design
    • Demonstrate skills in concept scheme generation
    • Demonstrate skills in scheme selection
    • Demonstrate skills in system modelling

    Syllabus

    The concept of systems, input and output ports, boundary and environment, design models, systems engineering with the use of requirements capture and structured methods of functional decomposition and function means trees. Introduction to Bond Graphs, mathematical modelling and simulation.

    Prerequisites

    Students should have some understanding of mechanical engineering science e.g. structures, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, materials, dynamics, control and simulation. Basics in electronics, actuators and sensors would also be beneficial.

  • ENGR502: Advanced Embedded Systems

    Aim

    This module aims to give students hands-on experience in interfacing microcontrollers to signals and motor drives, and writing programs to achieve specific objectives in assembler.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should:

    • Have a good understanding of the architecture and programming model of the Motorola 68HC08 devices
    • Be able to choose a particular device, integrate it into a system, and write working programs
    • Be aware of the implications of timing and memory constraints
    • Be aware of the web-based aids for programming these MCUs
    • Appreciate the benefit of simulators, debuggers and emulators

    Syllabus

    The 68HCO8 family of microcontrollers and supporting hardware and software. Several minor practical exercises and one major application of MCU for a task.

    Prerequisites

    Students should have some basic understanding of elasticity, standard electronic devices, resistance, capacitance and inductance.

  • ENGR503: Renewable Energy

    Aim

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamentals of a range of sources of renewable energy and means of its conversion into useful forms and to highlight technical, economic, environmental and ethical issues associated with the exploitation of renewable energy sources. The course focuses particularly on most aspects of wind-, tidal- and hydro-power, but many of the discussed principles are applicable to most other renewable energy forms.

    Students will gain an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of utilising renewable energy sources to meet everyday energy needs. Additionally, they will become familiar with engineering models and general technologies for the formulation and solution of several multidisciplinary problems of renewable energy engineering. The discussion of realistic engineering problems will allow students to be exposed to technologies presently used in the Research and Development Departments of modern Renewable Energy industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will:

    • Be able to make estimates of the energy available from a wide range of renewable energy resources at a given site
    • Have a deeper level of knowledge and understanding of wind-, tidal- and hydro-power, including the characteristics of the available energy resource, the detailed layout and functionality of the machinery required to convert the available energy resource into electricity, and also the relationship between the characteristics of the available resource and the design of the energy conversion system
    • Have a basic understanding of the energy transmission chain and the technical and economic issues associated with integrating the considered energy production systems in large power grids
    • Be able to set up advanced engineering models for the aeromechanical analysis and design of the machinery needed for the conversion of these forms of renewable energy into electricity
    • Possess the basic theoretical means for performing several types of cost analysis, including the assessment of the cost of energy for the particular source required
    • Have familiarity with fundamental computer analysis and design tools used in modern renewable energy industry
    • Have a good general view of the practicalities of harnessing renewable energy resources, including the environmental and economic advantages and disadvantages of utilising one form of renewable energy rather than another
    • Acquire additional knowledge in fluid mechanics and basic computer programming and familiarise themselves with how to use these means to set up and solve a class of renewable energy engineering problems wider than the set of examples discussed in the module

    Syllabus

    • Introduction to Renewable Energy
      sources, economic, environmental and ethical aspects
    • Wind Energy
      resource assessment (probability distribution functions, boundary layer elements and wind shear analysis, atmospheric turbulence)
      wind turbine types and layout
      wind turbine aerodynamics (dynamics of non-inertial reference frames, blade element momentum theory)
      yaw control, variable-pitch, variable-speed, active and passive stall power regulation
      generators
      aeromechanical turbine design
      cost analysis
    • Tidal Energy
      resource assessment
      tidal turbine types and layout
      tidal turbine hydrodynamics
      power control
      cavitation
      hydromechanical turbine design
      cost analysis
    • Hydropower
      resource assessment (geodetic, piezometric and total head)
      turbine hydrodynamics (velocity triangles in relative and absolute frames, degrees of reaction, hydraulic efficiency)
      power control and turbine choice in relation to grid demands
      relationships between turbine layout and characteristics of available resources
      hydromechanical turbine design
      cost analysis
  • ENGR504: Mechanics and Actuators

    Aim

    To enable students to identify, understand and set out the mechanism and mechanical design requirements for products and, in particular, actuators.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should be able to:

    • Understand the meaning and significance of factors which determine the performance and stability of machine systems
    • Be able to set out the scheme design of a machine/system which incorporates principles derived from this understanding
    • Be able to recognise and analyse significant detailed features of the machine system
    • Understand the principles of actuators
    • Select appropriate actuators
    • Appreciate current advances in actuator technology

    Syllabus

    • Principles of precision location and guidance of moving parts
    • Design with flexural elements
    • Bearing and seal design
    • Motion path analysis
    • Robot arm geometry
    • Robot arm kinematics and load analysis
    • Actuator operating principles, types, selection and actuator developments

    Prerequisites

    Students should have knowledge of mathematical tools used in the analysis of structures including matrix methods. Students should also have some basic understanding of elasticity, fluids (and it's ability to be compressed)

  • ENGR506: Intelligent System Control

    Aim

    This module introduces students to the design and application of intelligent control systems, with a focus on modern algorithmic, computer-aided design methods. Starting from the well-known proportional-integral algorithm, essential concepts such as digital and optimal control are introduced using straightforward algebra and block diagrams. The module addresses the needs of students across the engineering discipline who would like to advance their knowledge of automatic control and optimisation, with practical worked-examples from robotics, industrial process control and environmental systems, among other areas.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should be able to:

    • Understand the various hierarchical architectures of intelligent control systems
    • Use modern computational aids for the design of control systems
    • Understand and design optimal state variable feedback controllers
    • Identify mathematical models from engineering data
    • Appreciate cutting-edge research developments in these areas
    • Design and evaluate system performance for practical applications

    Syllabus

    Intelligent control, hierarchical control architectures, reviews of classical and modern control, digital control systems, state-space design, and system identification, with fully worked practical examples from across the engineering discipline.

    Assessment

    • 75% Exam
    • 25% Coursework
  • ENGR507: High-Frequency Electronics

    Aim

    To develop an understanding of the impact, importance and application of high-frequency electronics in the field of communications, remote control and wireless interfaces. To introduce students to the design of microwave circuits, including filters and amplifiers, using analytical techniques and computational design software. To consider impedance matching networks and the use of S-parameters and smith charts to solve RF problems. To introduce the student to various RF digital communication schemes and RF measurement techniques.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should have acquired:

    • Understand high-frequency circuits
    • Design RF circuits using analytical techniques and computational design software including filters and amplifiers
    • Design impedance matching networks
    • Read and use S-parameters and smith charts to solve RF problems
    • Understand RF digital communication schemes
    • Discuss various RF measurement techniques
    • Use relevant practical skills in the laboratories
    • Consider generic issues in computational electronic design
    • Understand common high-frequency systems (communications, interconnections)

    Syllabus

    • Basics of RF: Transmission Lines, Impedance matching, S-parameters, Smith charts
    • High-Frequency Circuit Design: RF components (couplers, splitters, circulators), Filter design, RF Noise, Low Noise Oscillators, RF amplifiers, High power amplifiers, Mixers, RF detection
    • RF Digital Communication: Antennas, I/Q modulation, RF Digital modulation types, Multiplexing and Channels, Receiving and Transmitting
    • In addition, practical projects cover RF circuit design in Microwave Office, together with building and testing the circuits

    Assessment

    • 75% Exam
    • 25% Coursework
  • ENGR510: System on Chip Engineering

    Aim

    The aim of this module is to develop students knowledge and understanding of the following topics:

    • Synthesis with VHDL and/or Verilog  (RTL styles, templates for synthesis, designing for FPGAs)
    • Synchronous system design (principles of timing, optimisation techniques, pipelining, designing with latches)
    • SoC Technology (Architectural issues and platforms, communication models, hardware organisation, programmers model for a H/W S/W codesign)
    • Reconfigurable logic on FPGA platforms in general and Altera devices in particular
    • The principles of Design for Test Engineering and in particular JTAG, related standards and trends in high-speed serial communications. 

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    • Understand hardware design flow from HDL design entry to physical layout, and gain an insight into optimisation techniques
    • Demonstrate understanding of advanced concepts in digital synchronous system design
    • Apply their insight into the hardware organisation of a SoC platform and the fundamentals of implementing a H/W S/W codesign
    • Understand the fundamentals of communication in SoCs
    • Apply their experience with the design flow for embedded design on the Altera DE-115 platform and through Modelsim and the Quartas Design Suite
    • Demonstrate and apply their understanding of test and design for test and in particular JTAG and recent extensions including 1149.6 and 1687

    Syllabus

    System-on-Chip (SoC) is the core technology for the integration of advanced digital and mixed signal electronics. This module will explore the design and manufacture of these electronic systems including methods of synthesising large digital function, achieving low power consumption, and managing timing at typical SoC clock speeds. Internal and external communication architectures will be investigated, Design for Testability, HW / SW codesign and fault tolerance in high variability processes. Practical sessions will utilise VHDL and / or Verilog to explore the implementation of finite state machines, test interfaces, bus structures and embedded cores.

    Assessment 

    • 80% Exam
    • 20% Coursework
  • ENGR511: Advanced CAD/CAM

    Aim

    This course aims to give students an understanding of modern computer-integrated methods used in design and manufacture, including 3D methods. A combination of lectures and practical exercises are given so that students have a first-hand experience of these methods and processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should be able to:

    • Describe common representations of 3D geometry
    • Describe examples of data exchange standards
    • Understand 2D and 3D NC machining methods
    • Manipulate some of the algebra associated with 3D surfaces and images
    • Create 3D designs using a combination of CAD/CAM facilities
    • Use Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to validate a simple design
    • Discuss current and future trends in computer integration in design and manufacture

    Syllabus

    CAD - 3D representations in CAD, solid and surface modelling, comparisons with 2D methods, spline curve and surface representations, parametric methods and data exchange standards. Use of computers in integrated design and manufacture teams. Practical exercises using AutoCAD14.

    CAM - 3 and 5 axis machine types, 3D tool-path generation, surface finish issues, job planning, fixtures and tool types. Quality checking using coordinate measuring machines.

    Practical exercises using CAMTEK's Pepscut Surface Modeller and the Bridgport NC mill

    Introduction to the use of the ANSYS finite element package in design. Practical exercises using ANSYS

    Assessment

    • 75% Exam
    • 25% Coursework
  • ENGR518: Nuclear Safety Environment

    Aim

    The module aims to educate students about the importance of safety in the nuclear industry and how that is affected by design, regulation and the influence of the media. The module will cover the design of several reactor types as well as manufacturing and operational procedures. The students will also be educated to understand reactor operating principles and design in the production of electricity. The module aims to help students to become familiar with the basic principles of nuclear safety through examining a number of accidents that have not only shaped the safety perspective of the industry but also its future.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module students should:

    • Understand the significance of the major regulatory issues associated with the civil nuclear industry
    • Understand how regulation, legislation and international cooperation has arisen as the result of accidents
    • Be able to apply power and engineering aspects of reactor design
    • appreciate the effect of the media on a high profile industry such as the nuclear industry and how this evidence of public opinion can affect the industry
    • On the successful completion of the module, students will have a context into which to place the modus operandi of the nuclear industry. It will start to give them those nuances of understanding of the nuclear industry that will be essential if they are to work in it. For example, not knowing at least some of the detail about Chernobyl would raise eyebrows as to the extent of the nuclear education of any candidate attempting to develop their career in the industry

    Syllabus

    Legislation covering civil nuclear sites - both production and operational, practical aspects of radiation safety in the nuclear industry including criticality and dosimetry, non-radiological (i.e. chemical) hazards, various nuclear incidents that have shaped safety measures in the nuclear industry and public perception of the nuclear industry.

    Assessment

    • 67% Exam
    • 33% Coursework
  • ENGR524: Microengineering

    This module addresses various topics concerning smart systems. Whilst working towards a masters degree in System-on-Chip, students will discover the applications of microfluidics within different areas of practice. Engineers and scientists working in either the electronics sector or pharmaceutical sector will gain an understanding of the evolution from micromechanics to biomedical polymer systems and healthcare applications. Packaging for hybrid smart integrated systems including system-in-package and stacking technology, and application of polymer carriers in microfluidic systems and plastic electronics will be covered and should be of particular interest to students interested in bioelectronics.

    For electronic and mechatronic specialists, qualitative learning outcomes will include an understanding of the technology and assembly solutions needed for a specific class of functions, in addition to knowledge of the underpinning engineering science associated with micro-mechanics and microfluidics, as well as an understanding of the structure of a range of sensors and actuators including biological sensors, capacitive and piezo-based MEMs. Quantitative abilities offered to electronic and mechatronic students include the use of hand calculation and computer-based simulation to design a range of microstructures and fluidic functions, interpretation of material properties and an understanding of the impact of these properties on performance, and the ability to design typical electronic readout circuits including photodetectors.

    Students will apply significant focus on the qualitative understanding of the power of micro and nanotechnology in order to realise a range of sensing and detection functions together with the integration of these functions in miniaturised bio-diagnostic instruments. With regard to qualitative outcomes, students will be skilled in the design and analytical methods required for realising microfluidic mixing, separation and detection.