PhD & Postgraduate Research

Research projects leading to the award of a PhD or Masters by Research are available in many areas of Engineering.

Academic staff with international reputations in their discipline are available to supervise and guide you, and we offer appropriate research training, library and electronic resources. Research within Engineering is organised into five research groups, which in turn contain more specialised research subgroups. The groups are led by permanent academic staff and usually supported by postdoctoral research associates and technicians. You will become an integral part of these teams and benefit from intellectual support and become part of the research environment of the Department. For both PhD and Masters by Research, the results of your research should make an original contribution to knowledge and be of a standard appropriate for publication.

To submit an application, simply create an account on the My Applications website and then select ‘Create a new application’ from your homepage once you are logged-in.

Using your account on the My Applications website, you are able to submit applications for the programme(s) which you wish to study, upload supporting documentation and provide us with information about referees. You may apply for all Lancaster University Engineering postgraduate programmes using this method.

Current Lancaster Students

If you are a current Lancaster student, or you have recently graduated from Lancaster, we can reduce the amount of information that you will need to provide as part of your application. You will need to provide only one reference and will not need to supply your Lancaster degree transcript. We will also pre-fill your personal details, ready for you to check.

If you use the My Applications website then you will be advised which documentation you need to upload or send to us. We can automatically contact your referees once you have submitted your application if you ask us to.

The supporting documentation screen will provide you with a list of required documents. These will usually include:

  • Degree certificates and transcripts of previous higher education (college/university) degrees or other courses that you have completed/for which you are currently studying. For transcripts in languages other than English, a certified English translation will be required.
  • A personal statement to help us understand why you wish to study your chosen degree.
  • You also need to complete a research proposal which should include the following:
    • the research area you are interested in
    • the research question(s) you are specifically interested in
    • who within Engineering appears best qualified to supervise you
    • the methods you envisage using in your studies
    • plus any other information which may be relevant
  • Two references
  • If English is not your first language, we require copies of English language test results.

You can apply at any time of the year for these courses. A PhD can begin at any time of the year, but a MSc by Research is normally started in October, in common with the taught MSc programmes. If you wish to be considered for funding, are applying from overseas or require on-campus accommodation, we recommend you to apply as early as possible.

If you would like more information before applying, please contact the Engineering Admission Office. If you have any queries during the application process, please contact our Postgraduate Admissions Team.

PhD supervisors

A range of projects available in Mid-Infrared Photonics, III-V Nanostructures and Quantum Dot Solar Cells

View Peter's profile

CASE funded PhD in Chemical Sensing NNL/Sellafield funded PhD in Mechanical Testing of Sludge

View David's profile

Electrochemical treatment of problematic wastes in the nuclear industry

View Richard's profile

Analysis of engineering materials; Development of mechanical meta-materials;

View Xiaonan's profile

Nuclear safeguards, contamination monitoring.

View Malcolm's profile

The following project opportunities are currently un-funded Design of photo-bio reactors for platform chemicals production Acidogenic digestion of organic waste for chemicals production Modelling of sedimentation for the characterisation of suspensions A new quantitative framework for the characterisation of wastewater

View Alastair's profile

I am constantly searching for highly qualified PhD candidates in the area of acoustic signal processing and control. Please email your CV along with other academic qualificatios if you are interested.

View Allahyar's profile

Millimetre wave vacuum electron devices design and fabrication

View Claudio's profile

Smart Materials for Nuclear Waste Immobilisation
Condition Monitoring of Power Cables in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)
Smart Sensors for Condition Monitoring of Concrete Structures

View Mohamed's profile

Control Engineering, System Identification and Robotics.

View James's profile

My research field is to discuss and investigate the implementation of the delta-operator in the control field and specifically utilizing the delta operator within the linear PIP and the non-linear SDP-PIP control areas. Discreet time control systems are usually presented either with the use of the backward shift or the forward shift operator (Z-transform). Due to discretizing issues, it is often found that few systems lose stability under fast and high rapidly sampling rates. It is shown in the literature that stability problems is ultimately can be improved by introducing a discrete-operator that is closely related to the continuous time operator ‘’s-operator’’. At very high sampling rates the delta-operator maps to the s-operator and this enhances the stability of the control system . PIP in the context of delta operator is initially started in Lancaster and still there is scope of research in using the delta-operator with the nonlinear version if the PIP which is SDP-PIP

View Sufian's profile

Research training

We take care of all of our students at Lancaster University. The Faculty of Science and Technology runs a series of training sessions designed to improve your skills and abilities during your PhD. Learn more

Research areas

Our research is recognised for its exceptional quality and international reputation and is supported by RCUK, EU and industry funding. As a result, our work crosscuts traditional research fields, is strongly multidisciplinary and focuses on achieving high impact. We have contributed substantially to a wide range of application domains including energy, transport, cyber-crime and social computing.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Investigating all the relevant aspects of chemical and biochemical engineering, from fundamental science to engineering applications.

E-MIT and Electronics

E-MIT and Electronics

A group focusing on research spanning from digital electronics and materials to high-frequency applications.

Energy

Energy

Addressing major scientific and technological challenges in emerging energy technologies and sustainability.

 Nuclear Science and Engineering

Nuclear Science and Engineering

Our approach in nuclear research covers robotics, instrumentation, and chemical engineering.

Structures, Materials and Manufacturing

Structures, Materials and Manufacturing

Understanding functional materials, composite systems, structural health monitoring, production processes and technologies.

Outstanding facilities

Our Engineering building opened in January 2015 and was purpose-built to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. It boasts state-of-the-art facilities for multi-disciplined engineering, with specially designed workshops, laboratories and a high-quality attractive working environment. Students can now work in a variety of ways outside of the traditional learning environment which enhances the quality of our students' experience.

Current funded opportunities

  • NGN Fully-funded PhD: Accident Tolerant? Preventing corrosion in uranium nitride fuels

    Details

    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD

    Description

    Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATFs) are the next generation of nuclear fuels, designed to maintain their integrity when exposed to the extreme conditions present during an incident, thereby preventing the release of radioactive material to the environment. Uranium nitride is a leading ATF candidate due to its high thermal conductivity high specific heat capacity and low thermal expansion that suppress overheating and swelling in the event of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). However, a significant obstacle to adoption of UN fuels in light water reactors (LWRs) is its extremely low oxidation resistance. Corrosion of fuel exposed to high-temperature pressurised water or steam, following a breach of the fuel cladding, would lead to the release of fuel debris and fission products to the coolant system. Therefore, a strategy for increasing the oxidation resistance of UN, either through coating or doping is essential.

    The aim of this project is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion of UN under reactor conditions, enabling the establishment of doping strategies to reduce the reactivity of the fuel’s surface making it safe for operation in LWRs. The project will employ a combination of state-of-the-art quantum mechanical simulations, supported by electrochemical and Raman spectroscopic studies of UN thin films, to understand how water interacts with the surface and how the introduction of defects and dopants, such as Cr and Si, will modify the surface chemistry and whether this can inhibit oxidation.

    Originally discounted for use in light water reactors (LWRs) due to its unacceptably high oxidation rate when exposed to high-temperature water and steam, uranium nitride is currently a leading candidate for use as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). However, before UN can be employed in LWRs it is essential to develop a strategy to reduce the oxidation rate to acceptable levels and this forms the focus of this project.

    An attractive method of passivating the UN surface is to use an additive that is homogeneously dispersed in a solid solution with the fissile material. The additive must react preferentially with the water molecules at the surface and form a stable oxide that is insoluble in water, which can then act as an oxidation barrier. The choice of additive is further constrained as it must be able to substitutionally solve into the nitride, leaving Zr, Al, Si and Cr as the leading candidates.

    An important goal in the study of corrosion processes is to determine what is the rate determining step (i.e. the slowest process). This is often the transfer of oxide and hydroxyl ions through the protective oxide or the chemical reactions occurring at the surface. The objective of this work, therefore, is to determine the rate determining step in the oxidation process of UN and how this changes due to the incorporation of additives, thereby allowing the development of a doping strategy to improve the accident tolerance of UN fuel.

    For more information, visit the NGN webpage.

    Eligibility

    Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Samuel Murphy, Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YW, UK.

    Applications

    Candidates must apply online via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation.

    Please contact the engineering admissions team should you require further information.

  • Industry-funded PhD: Development of the C Power Wave Energy Capture and Storage Device

    This PhD project investigates using compressed fluids as a wave energy storage system (WESS) and the development of an enabling innovative wave energy converter.

    Computational and experimental modelling will be carried out with the ultimate aim of advancing a selected Wave Energy and Storage System (WESS) up the technology readiness scale and progressing the technology as a viable commercial proposition.

    The goal for this WESS research and design project is to develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling capability verified and calibrated by experimental modelling which is able to optimise the design and performance of the WESS.

    Applicants should have an engineering degree.

    Industry Partner

    The researcher will work with Prof. George Aggidis who leads our renewable energy team in the Department of Engineering at Lancaster University and a new innovative start-up company C Power Ltd. The project will be at the forefront of a new wave of renewable energy development.

  • PhD Studentship in Solution-Processed Transparent Electronics

    Details

    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD - 3.5 Years

    Description

    Several materials have emerged as candidates to address the need for high performance and low power consumption large-area CMOS technologies including silicon-based thin films, organic semiconductors and metal oxides. Issues related to performance and instability of silicon and organic semiconductor-based devices limit the use of such materials to niche applications. On the other hand, the advances in the development of metal oxide semiconductors have created the possibility of preparing high electron mobility devices making them ideal candidates for applications in large-area electronics and opto-electronics. Further advancements, however, have been hampered by the lack of p-type oxides with comparable transport characteristics to their n-type counterparts, limiting the logic gates to-high power consumption- n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor logics. Despite the number of studies the subject still remains controversial so alternative oxides of intrinsic p-type characteristics are required. This proposal aims to the development of high electronic noise immunity and low static power consumption CMOS technology using novel intrinsically p-type metal oxide semiconductors processed at low temperatures on flexible substrates employing solutions-based techniques.

    The project will build on our current platform and focus on the deposition and characterisation of novel p-type metal oxides by a wide range of techniques available in Lancaster University (x-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, low-frequency noise etc.). The successful candidate will acquire a range of experimental skills and will be expected to write scientific papers and present their work in national and international conferences.

    Eligibility criteria

    Applicants should have a good undergraduate (first class or good 2:1) or masters degree in one of the disciplines: physics, materials science or electrical engineering, with a good knowledge of semiconductors. Demonstrated good hands-on experimental skills would be an advantage. In addition to the academic entry requirements, all applicants for research degree programmes must satisfy the English language entry requirements (For more information, visit: lancaster.ac.uk/study/international-students/english-requirements/requirements-p2/

    Applications

    Applications must be received by 30th June 2017. Candidates must apply online via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal: lancaster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-toapply-for-postgraduate-study/

    In the “project proposal” section of the application please enter the project title given above and identify that you wish to work with Dr George Adamopoulos at Engineering Department.

    To be eligible for the studentship, the funding requirements are that the candidate must either be a UK citizen or a European Union national. Overseas candidates are welcome to apply but will be required to cover the gap between home and international tuition fees.

    The Engineering Department particularly welcomes applications from women. We are committed to flexible working on an individual basis, welcome and embrace diversity, and are committed to the Athena SWAN principles.

    For informal queries please contact Dr George Adamopoulos -g.adamopoulous@lancaster.ac.uk.

  • PhD Studentship in Recovery of added value compounds from juice industry wastes

    Details

    • Funding type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 3.5 Years

    Description

    Background: Worldwide fruit and vegetables are processed to juices adding value but generating substantial amounts of waste which are disposed of, or used as feed/compost with low value.  These wastes present the juice industries with serious problems without viable technological solutions. Interestingly, these wastes could be ideal sources of valuable compounds with significant applications in the food, nutraceutical and materials sectors (e. g. polyphenols, sugars, pigments etc.), thus creating additional income and new jobs. The technological limitations for utilisation of such streams arise from their unstable nature and downstream processing cost. This proposal is based on the design of an efficient bio-refinery process which utilises wastes from juice production industries and the most appropriate sustainable methodologies.

    Project: The aim of this project is to develop novel strategies for the recovery of high-value compounds from fruit and vegetable juice processing wastes. It is expected to develop novel analytical methods to meet the characterization challenges arising during the project. The application of innovative pre-treatments, such as enzyme hydrolysis and pulse electric field extraction for maximising the target compounds’ recovery will be at the centre of the project together with the optimisation of the parameters affecting extraction using water and/or its mixtures with appropriate solvents. The candidate will optimise the pre-treatments and membrane separation conditions (UF and NF) for the recovery of target compounds from dilute extracts. Finally, the candidate, using the collected data, will validate cost models of innovative industrial scale multi-step separation processes which implement the proposed strategies for the valorisation of these wastes.

    This project is supported by facilities in the Department of Engineering and also benefits from established industrial links.

    Entry requirements

    Candidates for this position should have or expect to achieve a first-class or upper second-class degree in chemical engineering, chemistry, biochemistry or a closely related discipline. Experience in membrane separation processes, enzymatic pre-treatment and analytical methods (HPLC, mass spectroscopy, Ion Chromatography, UV-Vis spectroscopy and ICP) would be an advantage.

    Due to funding regulations, applications are restricted to UK/EU nationals. The scholarship provides a stipend for its entire duration and covers University tuition fees at the UK/EU level - this scholarship does not provide funding for the international fees of students who are not nationals of the European Union. 

    Excellent communication and English writing skills will be required. 

    Applications

    Early applications are strongly encouraged. The successful candidate is expected to start no later than October 2017. The position is open and applications will be considered until a suitable candidate is appointed. 

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation. However, it is recommended to notify before Dr Papaioannou of your interest in this position to help ensure timely consideration of your application. 

  • PhD Studentship in Advanced Manufacturing and Alloy Design

    Details

    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 

    Description

    Lancaster University is offering a number of fully-funded PhD studentships to meet their growing activity in advanced manufacturing and alloy design.

    The priority research topic areas include;

    • Design and manufacture of lightweight hybrid syntactic metal foam structures
    • Design and manufacture of advanced metallic alloy microstructures
    • Manufacture of magnesium metal matrix composites for automotive applications
    • Thermal treatment and microstructure control in advanced steels, titanium and magnesium alloys
    • Additive manufacturing of novel porous Ti structures and non-porous stainless steels and titanium alloys
    • Diffusion bonding of aerospace alloys
    • Thermodynamic, kinetic and plasticity modelling of new metallic alloys
    • Materials discovery adopting neural networks, Gaussian processes, genetic algorithms and clustering techniques

    We are seeking excellent candidates who are highly motivated and keen to engage with academic partners and industry. Successful candidates will develop a wide range of skills that will include; materials processing, mechanical testing, microstructure and numerical modelling and structural characterisation. Prior experience in manufacturing is not required.

    Qualifications and experience

    • The minimum academic requirement for admission is an upper second-class UK honours degree at the level of MSci, MEng, MPhys, MChem etc, or a lower second with a good Master's, (or overseas equivalents) in a relevant subject.
    • A strong background in plasticity and dislocation theory is required.
    • Knowledge of statistical thermodynamics and physical metallurgy is essential.
    • Computer programming skills are essential for the post. 
    • You must have excellent interpersonal skills, work effectively in a team and have experience of the preparation of presentations, reports or journal papers to the highest levels of quality. 

    This post is offered on a 36-months fixed-term appointment.

    Full sponsorship is available for EU-citizens only.

    Applications

    Please send CV and cover letter to Professor Andrew Kennedy (a.kennedy3@lancaster.ac.uk), Chair in Advanced Manufacturing (for advanced manufacturing interests) or Professor Pedro Rivera (p.rivera1@lancaster.ac.uk), LPW/Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair (for alloy design interests). Both professors are with the Department of Engineering, Lancaster University. 

    We welcome applications from people in all diversity groups.

    Lancaster University – ensuring equality of opportunity and celebrating diversity.

    Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system (http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-toapply-for-postgraduate-study/).

  • PhD Studentship in Novel Syntactic Foam Sandwich Structures

    Details

    • Deadline for Applications: 31st October 2017
    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 

    Description

    Metal syntactic foams are a “composite” mixture of a metal matrix and a porous (often ceramic) additive which confers “lightness” to the structure.  These low-cost alternatives to porous metals or traditional metal foams, show excellent stiffness to weight ratios, but their performance in lightweight and energy-absorbing structures is further enhanced by using them as the core of a sandwich structures with either metal or carbon fibre composite skins on the surface. Their unique combination of properties gives them the potential for widespread use, in particular in the transport sector.

    This project aims to enhance the understanding of this family of exciting, novel materials, through a comprehensive research programme that will address the relationship between structure (on a macro and micro level) and mechanical performance.  Underpinning this investigation will be finite element modelling of the mechanical behaviour, which will also serve to help develop a robust tool for the optimisation of the performance at minimum mass. The ideal outcome for the project would be a robust framework for the design optimisation of lightweight structures containing syntactic metal foam cores, for a range of geometries.

    The successful candidate will develop a wide range of skills that will include; materials processing, mechanical testing, FE modelling and structural characterisation.

    Eligibility Criteria

    To be eligible for a studentship, the funding requirements are such that the candidate is either a UK citizen or an EU national. Applicants from outside UK/EU are welcome to apply, however they will be required to demonstrate their ability to meet the difference between international and home tuition fees.

    Entry Requirements

    A first class or good 2:1 degree (or equivalent) in engineering, physics or physical chemistry (or a related discipline). The application should have experience of FE modelling.

    Applications

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation. For more information contact: 

    For further information, please contact Dr Xiaonan Hou (x.hou2@lancaster.ac.uk). 

  • PhD Studentship in Additive Manufacture of Porous Ti Using Sacrificial Porogens

    Details

    • Deadline for Applications: 31st October 2017
    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 

    Description

    Porous Ti structures for medical applications can be made by additive manufacture but are usually built as lattice structures, which not only requires complex programming of the laser path, but also fails to achieve the pore geometry and connectivity required for the necessary cell response.  Recent investigations have shown that porous Ti structures and be built by “conventional” methods using a mixed powder bed comprised of both Ti and fine salt (NaCl).  The porosity is revealed by dissolving away the residual salt (the porogen) in water.  The structures obtained look very promising, but the geometry of the pores is not always a direct replication of the geometry of the porogen.

    This PhD research programme will seek to develop a greater understanding of the process of pore generation so that it might be tailored for these exacting applications.  The build process will be simplified to understand how the salt powder “reacts” to the laser (melting or evaporating) as a function of heat input, salt size and different laser paths, where possible developing a model to mimic the phenomena observed.  Information from observations and modelling will then be used to create porous Ti structures with variable pore geometries by simple “in-process” adaptations.  The outcome is expected to be a “map” of the effect of material and process parameters on the pore structure in porous Ti structures.  This will enable processing to be adapted to tailor the pore structures to match those required for optimum mechanical performance, fluid transport and cell response.

    The successful candidate will develop a wide range of skills that will include; powder processing, additive manufacturing (SLM), process modelling and structural characterisation.

    Eligibility Criteria

    To be eligible for a studentship, the funding requirements are such that the candidate is either a UK citizen or an EU national. Applicants from outside UK/EU are welcome to apply, however, they will be required to demonstrate their ability to meet the difference between international and home tuition fees.

    Entry Requirements

    A first class or good 2:1 degree (or equivalent) in engineering, physics or physical chemistry (or a related discipline). 

    Applications

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation. For more information contact: 

    For further information, please contact Dr Andrew Pinkerton (aj.pinkerton@lancaster.ac.uk). 

  • PhD Studentship in Macroporous Polymers with Novel "Functionalised" Surfaces

    Details

    • Deadline for Applications: 31st October 2017
    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 

    Description

    Polymers with interconnected (open cell) porosity have widespread applications as filters, sound absorbing structures and as medical devices.  Their potential can be further expanded by “functionalising” the internal pore surfaces to confer anti-bacterial, catalytic, enhanced hydrophilic or hydrophobic character.  This coating step is, however, often difficult to perform on large, 3D structures as conventional processes struggle to provide uniform coating throughout the thickness.

    A novel, low cost and very simple process has been developed that simultaneously creates and coats macroscale porosity in polymers with fine powders of almost any type.  This Ph.D. research programme will seek to develop a greater understanding of this process, defining the possibilities and limitations (in terms of materials and structures that can be produced) and the effect on structural aspects such as pore interconnectivity, mechanical performance and physical aspects such as electrical and magnetic behaviour.  The outcome of this challenging project will not be to design structures to match the performance for a single application, such as bacterial removal in water treatment or enhancing cell multiplication on medical devises, rather it will aim to inform the community as to how this process could broaden the potential for porous polymers across wide engineering, healthcare and environmental landscapes.

    The successful candidate will develop a wide range of skills that will include; powder and polymer processing, process modelling and structural characterisation.

    Eligibility Criteria

    To be eligible for a studentship, the funding requirements are such that the candidate is either a UK citizen or an EU national. Applicants from outside UK/EU are welcome to apply, however they will be required to demonstrate their ability to meet the difference between international and home tuition fees.

    Entry Requirements

    A first class or good 2:1 degree (or equivalent) in engineering, physics or physical chemistry (or a related discipline). 

    Applications

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation. For more information contact: 

    For further information, please contact Dr Sarah Green (s.green@lancaster.ac.uk). 

  • Industry-funded PhD: Designing a Citizen-led Coastal Observation and Engagement Platform

    This project offers the successful applicant the opportunity to work with an SME, community representatives, coastal practitioners and researchers to develop an online application to help improve our understanding of the coastal environment. Specifically, this project will develop a platform to manage volunteered geographic information which can be used to help shape policies and practices for increasing resilience from and adapting to climate change.

    This project would be suitable for applicants with a background in developing online applications, remote sensing, and with a strong interest in data management. Applicants should be confident in conveying complex information in simple ways that encourage community engagement.

    Industry Partner

    The PhD Project will be supervised by Lancaster University and Rabbit Patch Ltd. Rabbit Patch is an independent service provider who specialise in graphic design, web solutions and educational marketing. The director of the company is passionate about the coastal environment and working with communities to understand, value and practically maintain beach frontages through volunteer beach cleans and education. She has also worked successfully on a number of significant coastal development projects promoting community engagement.

  • Industry-funded PhD: Automation of a post-production treatment to produce large surface area uniform heating

    This innovative research project with industry delivers immediate practical solutions. It pays a £14,000 tax-free stipend and has reduced tuition fees for the successful candidate. Fees are just £2,195 for UK/EU students, and £15,510 for non-UK/EU students.

    Uniform and efficient surface heating is a fundamental requirement in many markets from commercial food preparation to high tech applications in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. 2D Heat have developed an innovative heating technology which achieves excellent uniformity of surface heat by manually using an “ablation” treatment to selectively and systematically remove deposited material from its heating elements. This project seeks to establish new ways to automate this process using lasers to remove material in a rapid and controlled manner, which also reduces the cost of this treatment.

    The project would appeal to a 2.1 graduate in engineering, with experience/interests in automation and manufacturing (preferably laser processing).

    Industrial Partner

    This project is under the supervision of Dr David Cheneler, Department of Engineering at Lancaster University in collaboration with 2D Heat Ltd. 2D Heat is an innovative research company commercialising “flat” heating elements for many applications. The unique lightweight heating elements deliver excellent energy efficiency compared to traditional coiled wire elements and are applied directly to flat or contoured rigid surfaces.

  • PhD Studentship in Modelling and Design of Redox Flow Energy Storage Systems

    Details

    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 
    • Deadline for Applications: 15th December 2017

    Description

    Redox flow energy storage systems offer unique advantages over batteries and other devices because the charging and discharge processes are separated from the storage and even from each other. This flexibility in the design affords great opportunities for optimisation against a range of objectives such as, but not limited to, rapid opportunistic charging exploiting excess wind power to slow base load charging exploiting low demand nighttime periods. The configuration of the process equipment in conjunction with the electrochemistry leads to complex non-linear dynamics. In addition, start-up, shut-down and current reversal can impose chemical and physical stresses on components leading to excessive corrosion and failure.

    Working with the redox flow research team in Energy Lancaster the successful candidate will investigate and develop models to describe the electrochemical and flow processes at a range of scales from the molecular to the complete process system. The work will be informed by current empirical research in electrolyte systems being carried out by the group. It is envisaged that the outputs of this work will inform many aspects of redox flow energy storage systems from a selection of electrolytes and the design and novel fabrication of electrolysers through process systems to the integration of systems with complementary storage technologies and grids.

    Eligibility Criteria

    To be eligible for a studentship, the funding requirements are such that the candidate is either a UK citizen or an EU national. Applicants from outside UK/EU are welcome to apply, however, they will be required to demonstrate their ability to meet the difference between international and home tuition fees.

    Entry Requirements

    A first class or good 2:1 degree (or equivalent) in chemical engineering or a cognate discipline. Experience with computational modelling in one or more of the following fields is essential: Fluid flow, Process systems, chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer.

    Applications

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation. The application should make clear that you are applying for this funded project and upload the project described above as the research proposal.

    For further information, please contact Professor Alastair Martin (a.martin1@lancaster.ac.uk).

  • DC breakdown studies for high gradient particle accelerators at CERN

    Details

    • Anticipated start date: October 2018
    • Type of Study: PhD
    • Supervisors: Dr G Burt, Dr S Green, Dr W Weunch

    Description

    A PhD student is sought at Lancaster University but based at CERN in Switzerland to study dc vacuum arcs at high electric fields and how it relates to radio frequency arcs. An arc is caused when a plasma forms at high fields from ionisation of a gas evaporated from a surface. Vacuum arcs are the limiting factor in the maximum accelerating gradient of many particle colliders. The exact limits and breakdown rates of vacuum arcs will be studied using a pulsed dc system, which has fast diagnostics and imaging and by studies of the surfaces after arc damage. The PhD student will be based at cern (after a 6 month training period at Lancaster) and will focus on experimental upgrades and measurements

    The PhD will be based in the Engineering department and will be supervised by Dr G Burt, and Dr S Green.

    Qualifications

    The successful candidate will have or expect to obtain a first or upper second-class degree or equivalent (e.g. MEng, MPhys, MSci) in physics, electrical engineering or mechanical engineering

    Funding and eligibility

    The project is fully funded by CERN for 3.5 years; UK and other EU citizens are eligible to apply. The student will receive a standard stipend of around £14.5k while in Lancaster for the first 6 months, followed by a stipend of 3679 CHF/month when at CERN for the following 3 years.

    A full package of training and support will be provided by the Cockcroft Institute. An IELTS score of at least 6.5 is required.

    Contact Dr Graeme Burt for further information.

    How to apply

    Visit The Cockroft Institute for details.

    This position will remain open until filled.

  • Fully Funded PhD studentship on design and fabrication of millimetre wave vacuum electronics devices for 5G wireless networks.

    Details

    • Type of Study: PhD
    • Supervisors: Professor Claudio Paoloni, Dr Rosa Letizia

    Description

    A fully funded PhD studentship is available for an outstanding graduate to undertake advanced applied research in the field of millimetre wave vacuum electron devices, for the design and fabrication of novel millimetre-wave Traveling Wave Tubes (TWT), to create new millimetre wave communication systems above 100 GHz, for high data rate. The PhD studentship is in the frame of the Horizon 2020 project ULTRAWAVE “Ultra capacity wireless layer beyond 100 GHz based on millimetre wave Traveling Wave Tubes” (www.ultrawave2020.eu).

    Your role will be to design state of the art Traveling Wave Tubes above 100 GHz, including the electron gun, the collector, the magnetic focusing and windows, by using the cutting edge art facilities at Engineering Department.

    You will have available a suite of advanced three-dimensional simulation tools (CST, MAGIC3D, HFSS) for a full characterization of the millimetre wave structures and large signal parameter simulation, starting from the initial design up to the full TWT structures.
The new 110 GHz Vector Network Analyser at Engineering Department will provide the measurement facility to test the samples fabricated by different techniques, as CNC milling or UV LIGA (a photolithographic technique of high aspect ratio proved up to 1 THz).

    You will perform three-dimensional simulations, you will have the opportunity to test novel slow wave structures, you will participate in the fabrication, assembly and test of novel TWTs for the new 5G networks.

    You will work with renowned experts in the field, in a stimulating international research environment.

    The PhD studentship is based at Lancaster University.

    The E-MIT (Engineering of Microwave, Terahertz and Light) group at the Engineering Department at Lancaster University is a leading group in the field of millimetre and THz vacuum electron devices and applications.

    Funding and eligibility

    You should have a Degree at 2.1 or above (or equivalent) in engineering science or physics and should demonstrate a genuine enthusiasm and motivation to explore novel research fields. Knowledge of electromagnetics, microfabrication processes, three-dimensional simulations could be advantageous, but not essential.

    The following financial support will be received:

    • Full funding of tuition fees for 3 years
    • A stipend of 14,296 (annual stipend per annum) in line with RCUK guidelines
    • Access to a Research Training Support Grant

    How to apply

    Informal enquiries can be made to Professor Claudio Paoloni or Dr Rosa Letizia.

    Applications should be made via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your personal details, background and upload supporting documentation.

Other opportunities

Next Generation Nuclear

The Next Generation Nuclear Centre for Doctoral Training (NGN CDT) provides fully-funded four-year PhD studentships, available across the partner universities and many of these will involve close collaboration with industry, including secondment into industrial nuclear research centres.

Next Generation Nuclear is a partnership between the Universities of Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield. Its mission is to develop the next generation of research leaders to support the UK's present and future strategic nuclear programmes - cleaning up the nuclear legacy, building new nuclear power stations, and defence and security.

Coming soon

NGN will work with all the UK's major industrial and regulatory stakeholders, including Amec, Areva, EDF, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, the National Nuclear Laboratory, Rolls-Royce, and Sellafield Ltd, and with leading overseas institutions.

A list of the specific Next Generation Nuclear PhD projects will be available around November/December each year. We have one intake a year in September.

We run various open days across the partner institutions throughout the year so please keep an eye on the website for the latest information.

For more information please contact - ngn@manchester.ac.uk

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