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New Appointments in the Department of English and Creative Writing

Date: 1 October 2011

The Department of English & Creative Writing is delighted to welcome three new members of staff, who will join us in Michaelmas Term 2011: Jenn Ashworth, a novelist who will join Creative Writing as a specialist in literary prose; Jo Carruthers, whose research interests are in literature and religion and literature and place; and Eleanor Rycroft, whose research investigates the relationship between drama and politics at the court of Henry VIII

Read more about our new appointments:

Jenn Ashworth

Jenn Ashworth's first novel, A Kind of Intimacy, won a Betty Trask Award and her second, Cold Light was published earlier this year with Sceptre. She has recently been featured on the BBC's Culture show as one of Britain's 12 most promising novelists - as selected by John Mullan. She is currently working on her third novel - set in Utah and Lancashire on the 23rd April, 2010. Her website is www.jennashworth.co.uk

Eleanor Rycroft

Eleanor Rycroft comes to Lancaster from Oxford Brookes where she has been investigating the relationship between drama and politics at the court of Henry VIII through practice-based research at Hampton Court Palace. A former theatre director, she has a strong interest in the history of the stage and conditions of performance during the Renaissance. She has taught early modern literature and drama at the Universities of Sussex, Oxford Brookes and Reading.

Jo Carruthers

Jo Carruthers' research interests are in literature and religion and literature and place. Her first book, Esther Through the Centuries (Blackwell, 2008), is a reception history of the biblical story of Esther in literature and culture and her next book, England's Secular Scripture: Islamophobia and the Protestant Aesthetic is to be published by Continuum later this summer. The book considers the centrality of simplicity to English identities through an analysis of literature from Spenser to Orwell and traces simplicity's roots to Protestant Reformation theology and its importance to contemporary identification of non-English identities.

 

Further information

Associated departments and research centres: English and Creative Writing

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