Skip Links | Access/General | Site Map
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Lancaster University
You are here: Home >

Corporate self-presentation and self-centredness: a case for cognitive Critical Discourse Analysis

Date: 30 May 2007 Time: 4.30 pm

The first of two Summer Term LAEL Departmental Lectures:

Veronika Koller, Lancaster University

Corporate self-presentation and self-centredness: a case for cognitive Critical Discourse Analysis

Wednesday 30th May 4.30pm-6.00pm, Bowland North Small Lecture Theatre

Refreshments from 4.00 pm.... All welcome!

ABSTRACTCorporate self-presentation and self-centredness: a case for cognitive Critical Discourse AnalysisThis talk presents a theory of cognitive Critical Discourse Analysis that operates with a cyclical model in which schemata of social actors and groups as well as scripts for intra- and inter-group interaction are reflected in discourse. In any given discourse, it is argued, particular models will rise to prominence, usually according to the power status and discourse access of the group holding them. Developing this framework further, repeated exposure to such models under similar conditions of reception is then theorised to lead to their reinforcement in the recipient's mind. This research paradigm is developed by drawing on work in social cognition, especially social interaction (Semin and Fiedler 1992), as well as discourse analysts such as van Dijk (2005) and Chilton (2005). The paper then proceeds to suggest a set of linguistic parameters that can help link claims about self-presentation in socio-cognitive and discursive terms back to concrete textual evidence. The theoretical and methodological frameworks are illustrated by analysing the strategies of positive self-evaluation, self-presentation and even self-centredness in a corpus of corporate mission statements, e.g. pronoun usage, attribution and process types. While positive self-presentation comes as no surprise in a promotional genre, it still contradicts the focus on others, particularly customers and investors, which is professed in the same texts, and thus shows the increasing detachment of the corporate sector from the rest of society. Finally, in order to see if and how promotional discourse has colonised other genres and discourses (Fairclough 2003), the results of the analysis are compared with instances of academic writing.

ReferencesChilton, P. (2005): "Missing links in mainstream CDA: Modules, blends and the critical instinct". In Wodak, R. and P. Chilton (eds) A New Agenda in (Critical) Discourse Analysis. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 19-51.Fairclough, N. (2003): Analysing Discourse: Textual Analysis for Social Research. London: Routledge. Semin, G.R. and K. Fiedler (eds) (1992): Language, Interaction and Social Cognition. London: Sage. van Dijk, T.A. (2005): "Contextual knowledge management in discourse production: a CDA perspective". In Wodak, R. and P. Chilton (eds) A New Agenda in (Critical) Discourse Analysis. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 71-100. E-mail: v.koller@lancaster.ac.uk

Contact:

Who can attend:

 

Further information

Organising departments and research centres: Linguistics and English Language

«Back

Search FASS

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
| Home | Departments | People | Study Here | Research | Business and Enterprise | News and Events |
- FASS Intranet -

Save this page: Delicious Del.icio.us Reddit Reddit Facebook Stumble It Stumble It!

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Lancaster University
Lancaster LA1 4YD
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1524 510851
E-mail:

E-mail: Email address protected by JavaScript. Please enable JavaScript to contact us.

Copyright & Disclaimer | Privacy and Cookies Notice

Save contact details

Save contact details