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Activism and Social Movements in Climate Change and Renewable Energy

Date: 28 October 2011 Time: 1.00 pm - 5.00 pm

Venue: FASS Building Meeting Room 1

The Sociology Department's Centre for the Social and Economic Aspects of Genomics (Cesagen), Centre for the Study of Environmental Change (CSEC) and the Social Activism Research and Teaching Cluster are pleased to announce a joint seminar:

Activism and Social Movements in Climate Change and Renewable Energy

28 October 2011, FASS Building, Meeting Room 1, 1.00pm - 5.00pm

Discussion will draw upon two papers given by Professor Andrew Jamison (Aalborg University, DK) and Dr Adam Lucas (University of Wollongong, Aus.)

Professor Andrew Jamison is from the Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Denmark. His talk concerns "Social Movements and the Climate Change Debate" and will draw on recent research on climate change and theories of new social movements. See Andrew's web pages here http://vbn.aau.dk/en/persons/andrew-jamison(a9dcf956-26c0-4cb9-b8a7-9c2f174435ac).html. And for his 2010 paper on Climate change and new social movements: http://wires.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WiresArticle/wisId-WCC88.html

Dr Adam Lucas is from the Science & Technology Studies Program, University of Wollongong, Australia. Adam's paper will be: 'Renewable Energy Activism in Australia, Oklahoma and Texas: Building Constituencies and New Sources of Power in the Business, Political and Community Sectors'. See Adam's web pages here http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/staff/selpl/UOW044562.html and the abstract for his paper below:

Abstracts

Andrew Jamison 'Social Movements and the Climate Change Debate'

This paper will discuss climate change knowledge from the perspective of social movement theory, a relatively neglected topic in the literature on climate change knowledge. I will review relevant studies and theories of social movements with special attention to the role of knowledge‐making in social movements, before tracing the relations between social movements and climate change knowledge from the 1970s to the present. Climate change first emerged as an issue of public concern within the context of the environmental movements of the 1970s and 1980s, while skepticism was shaped, in significant ways, by the neo‐conservative and neo‐nationalist movements that grew to political significance in the 1980s and 1990s. The neo‐liberal movements of the 1990s and 2000s have helped shape the recent rise to public attention of climate change as an overarching political problem. Finally, I will discusses how concerns with 'climate justice' have emerged as part of a social movement for global justice.>

Adam Lucas 'Renewable Energy Activism in Australia, Oklahoma and Texas: Building Constituencies and New Sources of Power in the Business, Political and Community Sectors'

Oklahoma and Texas are two of the most conservative political constituencies in the United States. Like Australia, both states have extensive fossil fuel resources. But unlike Australia, both have made significant commitments to renewable energy infrastructure over the last decade, with Oklahoma installing 2,000 MW of wind power (more than the whole of Australia) and Texas installing more than 10,000 MW of wind power (more than any other state in the Union). In Oklahoma, most of the wind power development has been driven at the community level, with little support from the state government until very recently. In Texas, most of the wind power development has been driven by industry with the support of key politicians and wealthy industrialists, combined with a renewable portfolio standard that has avoided state and federal government subsidies. In Australia, state and federal support for renewables has been perfunctory and poorly implemented. Apart from the state of South Australia, which derives 20% of its electricity from renewables (primarily wind power) and Tasmania, which derives around 78% of its electricity from hydropower (mostly installed between the 1930s and 1970s), the only form of renewable energy which has grown substantially in recent years is solar photovoltaics, largely through poorly designed but very popular (and quickly abolished) state and territory feed-in tariffs. Dr Lucas will discuss some of the reasons for these very different renewable energy development pathways, and the role which activists have played in promoting and supporting renewables, as well as opposing them, in these different jurisdictions.

Event website: http://csec.lancs.ac.uk/index.php

Contact:

Who can attend: Anyone

 

Further information

Associated staff: Claire Waterton

Organising departments and research centres: Centre for Science Studies, Centre for the Study of Environmental Change, Geography, Lancaster Environment Centre, Sociology

Keywords: Climate change, Science, technology and society, Social movements, Sociology

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Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Lancaster University
Lancaster LA1 4YD
United Kingdom

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