What Oxfam can learn from charities that survived scandals


14 September 2018 10:51
Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International, Mark Goldring, CEO of Oxfam GB, and Caroline Thomson, chair of trustees for Oxfam GB, giving evidence before the Commons Development Committee. PA/PA Wire/PA Images
Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International, Mark Goldring, CEO of Oxfam GB, and Caroline Thomson, chair of trustees for Oxfam GB, giving evidence before the Commons Development Committ

Dr Mark Hurst, of Lancaster's History Department, has contributed an article to The Conversation on 'What Oxfam can learn from charities that survived scandals'. 

Mark's piece looks at historic and recent cases of controversy surrounding charities, including Amnesty International and Greenpeace, to consider the role of NGOs in the political landscape and how public trust can be affected by scandals. You can read Mark's article on The Conversation website.

Dr Mark Hurst is Lecturer in the History of Human Rights . His current research focuses on the history of Amnesty International, and in particular how organisations such as Amnesty functioned during the Cold War, when human rights issues were often at the forefront of international relations. Mark is also interested more broadly in the history of human rights, dissent, and activism.

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