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Teaching and Learning Forums

    Upcoming Teaching and Learning Forums

    If you wish to attend any of the events below please confirm by emailing oed@lancaster.ac.uk with the session title in the subject.

    Previous Events (list of titles, recordings and materials)

    Upcoming Events

    Dr Allison Hui: Beyond Pain, Strain & Monotony: Using the Voice in Classroom & Presentation Settings

    Friday 30th January 13.00-14.00
    HR TR 1&2

    Abstract:

    The voice is a valuable tool for lecturers and presenters of all types, and yet it is often only addressed when it is seen to have problems. An attention to and knowledge of the voice, however, can not only help to minimize common problems such as vocal fatigue and volume, but also aid in adding aural interest and variety to lectures and presentations.

    This session provided a basic introduction into factors affecting vocal production, including body-voice connection and breathing. These factors will then be linked to the practice of using the voice in classroom and seminar settings. Participants will be given brief opportunities to experiment with their voices, exploring a selection of exercises used by singers and actors for getting in touch with and developing healthy vocal use.

    Session materials are available on this webpage:

    http://www.lancs.ac.uk/hr/oed/cpd/voice.html

    The Globalisation of the Classroom

    Friday 20th March, 9:30am-4pm
    HR TR 1&2

    This event is free for Lancaster University Management School colleagues.

    Please note, as a member of the host university, you do not have to be a BAM member to register for the event.

    The key themes of the day and presenter biographies are available here in PDF format. The programme and session abstracts for the day are also available.

    Please book your place via the BAM website:

    https://www.bam.ac.uk/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=2871

    Previous Events

    Dr Michele Luxon: A Reconceptualisation of the Cross-Cultural Adaptation Process from a Chinese Student Perspective

    Monday 12th January 12.30-13.45
    HR TR 1&2

    Abstract:

    There is a Pantopto recording of this session available here: http://dtu-panopto.lancs.ac.uk/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=d21bc1f8-e5af-4bfe-8fa8-5305f65a419c

    This talk describes the research findings in relation to the way Chinese students adapt to a new educational and socio-cultural environment when they come to Britain to do their undergraduate studies. The talk traces the adaptation process, taking as its starting point the educational context from which the students come. It then looks at the kind of adjustments they have to make and the strategies they use in order to adapt. It also takes account of some of the attributes that Chinese students bring to the new learning environment and how these affect their learning outcomes. In an attempt to move away from a stereotypical view of Chinese students the emphasis in the talk is on the different kinds of responses of individual students to the new experiences they encounter.

    About Dr Michele Luxon:
    Before coming to Lancaster Michele spent fifteen years working for the British Council and Overseas Development Agency managing UK government funded education projects in a variety of different countries. Since 2001 Michele has been developing the network of university overseas partnerships where she has set up collaborative teaching programmes in China, India, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Japan. Michele’s area of research is Cross-Cultural Education and her doctoral research involved developing a theoretical framework for examining how students acculturate to new academic practices and a new socio-cultural context when they make the transition from one learning environment to a new one when they study abroad.

    Symposium on Good Practice in Assessing Group Work

    Recordings from event available on the Sharing Practice Moodle (you can self enrol onto the site) here.

    LUMS Teaching and Learning Forum

    Supported by Organisation & Educational Development (OED)

    Professor Etienne Wenger: Towards a Theory of Social Learning Capability
    Thursday 11th October 2012, 5 - 6.30pm
    LT1, LUMS

    Abstract:

    Professor Etienne Wenger is a globally recognized thought leader in the field of social learning and communities of practice. He has authored and co-authored seminal articles and books on the topic, including Situated Learning, where the term “community of practice” was coined. His work on social learning theory places learning at the core of human existence and assumes that it is fundamentally a social phenomenon. Learning is the foundation of who we are (becoming). During this teaching forum, Etienne will explore the theory of social learning capability with the audience along with the concepts and dimensions that are emerging in his inquiry.

    http://wenger-trayner.com/

    Please note that at the request of the presenters the materials and recording of this session will only be available to those with a Lancaster University login

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    Jude Carroll: An Exploration of Teaching and Learning Issues when Working with International Students
    Wednesday 7th November 2012
    LUMS, LT09

    Abstract:

    This session set out the common learning issues which occur when students from highly diverse educational backgrounds, with often equally diverse levels of language competence, enrol on Lancaster courses. It suggests ways that teachers might adapt their practices in the light of their student's cultural and linguistic diversity, and points to resources and sources of support for this interesting but also challenging teaching context. The aim is better learning for all, less strain on teachers, and enhanced opportunities for success.

    A PANOPTO recording of this session is available:

    Get the flash plugin You need Flash Player to view the video content

    Jude Carroll worked for several decades as an educational developer at Oxford Brookes University in the UK, where she specialised in managing student plagiarism and in effective teaching of international students. She researches, writes and presents around the world on aspects of managing plagiarism. She is the author of The Handbook for Deterring Plagiarism in Higher Education (2007, 2nd ed) and with Dr Janette Ryan, she co-edited the widely used text Teaching International Students: improving learning for all (2005: Routledge). In 2009, Jude was awarded a UK National Teaching Fellowship in recognition of her work in both fields.

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    LUMS Teaching and Learning Forum

    Supported by Organisation & Educational Development (OED)

    Jude Caroll: Defining, Detecting, and Dealing with Plagiarism in 2012
    Wednesday 7th November 2012 - 13:00-14:00 Formal Session; 14.00-14.30 Informal Q&A
    LUMS LT8

    Abstract:

    This interactive session covered a range of topics in a joined-up approach to dealing with plagiarism in 2012. The presentation and associated activities cover ways to ensure students know what is expected and to ensure they have necessary skills to avoid plagiarism. Issues of designing assessments which are hard to find, fake or copy were also explored. The session looked at how to spot instances of misuse of others' work, including texts from commissioning sites, and finished with suggestions for institutional management of plagiarism cases when they appear.

    A PANOPTO recording of this session is available:

    Get the flash plugin You need Flash Player to view the video content

    Jude Carroll worked for several decades as an educational developer at Oxford Brookes University in the UK, where she specialised in managing student plagiarism and in effective teaching of international students. She researches, writes and presents around the world on aspects of managing plagiarism. She is the author of The Handbook for Deterring Plagiarism in Higher Education (2007, 2nd ed) and with Dr Janette Ryan, she co-edited the widely used text Teaching International Students: improving learning for all (2005: Routledge). In 2009, Jude was awarded a UK National Teaching Fellowship in recognition of her work in both fields.

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    Sinead Boyd: Responding to Students’ Difficulties with Seminars
    28th November 2012 - 13.30 – 15.00 & 30th January 2013 - 13.30-15.00
    Faraday Seminar Room 4

    Abstract:

    In seminars students can often present a variety of difficulties ranging from being unprepared, appearing unengaged, to not turning up. This aim of this session is to explore some straightforward and practical ideas for those who lead seminars or tutorials. Following the session participants will be able draw on these ideas to respond to students’ difficulties by removing barriers to learning and ensuring that students have opportunities to make progress throughout the module.

    For more information on this session, please contact the OED team direct.

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    Glynis Cousin: Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge
    5th December 2012 - 13.00-14.00
    LUMS LT8

    Abstract:

    This session will introduce some key methods and ideas associated with threshold concepts.

    "A threshold concept can be considered as akin to a portal, opening up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something. It represents a transformed way of understanding, or interpreting, or viewing something without which the learner cannot progress. As a consequence of comprehending a threshold concept there may thus be a transformed internal view of subject matter, subject landscape, or even world view. This transformation may be sudden or it may be protracted over a considerable period of time"
    (Meyer and Land 2003)

    My focus will be firstly on its potential as a ‘less is more’ design tool and secondly on notions of liminal learner states and troublesome knowledge. I will draw on relevant research and cases to explore the usefulness of these notions and what they tell us about student-teacher relations. In so doing I will suggest a review of the ideas which dominate higher education studies, namely ‘student-centredness’, the ‘student experience’ and learning outcomes. I hope the session will be of practical use.

    For more information on this forum, please contact the OED team direct.

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    Roberta Kerr: Voice Workshop: Beyond Pain, Strain & Monotony... Lecture & Classroom Settings
    4th February 2013 - 13.30 – 15.00

    Human Resources Training Room 1&2

    Abstract:

    The voice is a valuable tool for lecturers and presenters of all types, and yet it is often only addressed when it is seen to have problems. An attention to and knowledge of the voice, however, can not only help to minimize common problems such as vocal fatigue and volume, but also aid in adding aural interest and variety to lectures and presentations.

    This session will provide a basic introduction into factors affecting vocal production, including body-voice connection and breathing. These factors will then be linked to the practice of using the voice in classroom and seminar settings. Participants will be given brief opportunities to experiment with their voices, exploring a selection of exercises to develop healthy vocal use.

    There are session tools and further resources for supporting your voice available.

    For more information on this session, please contact the OED team direct.

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    Jenny Mackness (Independent Education Consultant) & Dr. Roy Williams (Senior Lecturer in Mathematics, Portsmouth University): Emergent Learning
    12th February 2013 - 13.00-15.00

    Human Resources Training Room 1&2

    Abstract:

    In any learning community, there is always a need to balance the acquisition of knowledge with the creation of new knowledge.

    In a recently published paper Footprints of Emergence (2012) we developed a 3D learning landscape model for exploring the relationship between prescribed and emergent learning in any given curriculum. We did this by repeatedly testing our descriptive landscapes (or footprints) against theory, research, and practice across a range of case studies. One of those case studies was Lancaster University’s Masters Degree in E-Business and Innovation. Others include a teacher training programme, a massive open online course and an interactive learning environment designed for children on the autism spectrum. Since publication of the paper we continue to gather case studies and consider the implications of the model for curriculum design and emergent learning.

    In this session we will explain our approach to drawing Footprints of Emergence and discuss how this practical tool can be used by curriculum designers to explore the dynamics between prescribed and emergent learning and manage the learning landscape.

    We will also encourage you to draw footprints for your own courses. In preparation for this session and work we are doing with other groups, we have set up a wiki on Footprints of Emergence, which includes instructions on how to do this.

    Footprints of Emergence:
    http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1267

    Masters Degree in E-Business and Innovation
    http://www.lums.lancs.ac.uk/masters/MScEbusiness/

    A wiki on Footprints of Emergence
    http://footprints-of-emergence.wikispaces.com/home

    For more information on this forum, please contact the OED team direct.

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    Lecture Capture: Panopto - Possibilities and Practicalities
    19th March 2013 - 13:00-14:30

    LUMS LT1

    Abstract

    The trial of the Lecture Capture software, Panopto, has presented lecturers with a range of new possibilities and a range of new challenges. But why make recordings of lectures? What are the implications? Is this the beginning of the end of traditional face-to-face classes? Who benefits?

    These are early days, but so far student response to the lecture capture trial has been positive and for now the trial is set to continue.

    This session sets out to explore the possibilities and challenges that recording lectures presents, using experiences from the pilot to date, and asks in what ways it can be used to help learning.

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    Diverse learning for large classes: Supervising Masters Dissertations

    Professor Steve Young, Department of Accounting & Finance
    31st October 2013 13.00-14.00

    LUMS LT7

    Faculty of Science & Technology Teaching & Learning Forum
    Supported by Organisation & Educational Development (OED)

    Abstract

    Individual dissertation supervision creates significant challenges for large programmes. The Department of Accounting and Finance employs an alternative model to cope with MSc numbers in excess of 150 students per year. The approach involves offering a small number of standard dissertation streams (currently four). Each stream is centred on an advanced topic in accounting or finance and is normally managed by two faculty members. Students on each stream receive a generic dataset (or access to data sources) relating to the topic area, from which they must produce an individual piece of research. To support their work, students receive 40 hours of lectures on the topic, six weeks of drop-in ‘surgery’ sessions, and detailed comments on the first draft of their dissertation submitted mid-July.

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    Overcoming Challenges in Redesigning “Inherited” Courses

    Allan Discua-Cruz, Institute for Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development
    Thursday 12th December, 3.00 - 4.00pm
    TR1&2, HR Building

    Materials from this session are available on the Effective Teaching Moodle site, which is available for self-enrolment to anyone with a Lancaster University login

    Here is the direct link to the Moodle page with these materials.

    Lecturers new to a department can often be asked to take over or “inherit” courses previously led by other colleagues who may or may not still be in the department.

    This presents interesting challenges for the inheritor:

    This session will begin with a case study from personal experience and suggests an approach, both for individuals and departments, that draws on a social capital perspective.

    Sunway University Presents Supported by Organisation & Educational Development (OED)
    Monday 17th March 2014, 12.15 - 13.15pm followed by Q&A 13.15-13.30
    TR2&3, FASS

    This is a welcome opportunity to hear about some of the work of colleagues in one of our International Teaching Partnerships, Sunway University (SU) in Malaysia. Annyza Tumar and Ann Rosnida Mohd Deni are currently carrying out research into teacher development in the Malaysian context. They are also helping to deliver the i-CAP programme (international-Certificate in Academic Practice) to colleagues in SU, in collaboration with Lancaster University OED colleagues.

    Annyza Tumar: Students’ Belief of Peer Feedback for Oral Presentations in an Undergraduate Course
    Abstract:
    This session describes an exploration into students’ beliefs about peer feedback on oral presentations in the context of a communication course with local and international students. The presenter will share the meaning of peer feedback as perceived by the students, what students felt about giving and receiving it and whether training would change their perception and feedback practice in the classroom.

    Ann Rosnida Mohd Deni: Teacher Learning in an Inquiry Community: Process, Impact and Interferences
    Abstract:
    This session will discuss research findings of a professional development project in the form a teacher inquiry community (TIC) carried out at Sunway University, Malaysia to develop university lecturers’ teaching practices. The session will share processes identified within the TIC, the impact of participation on teachers and their practice and contextual factors which impacted the processes.

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    The FHM Teaching and Learning Forum and OED are delighted to have Helen Beetham running a workshop on digital literacies

    Thursday 10th April– 10.00-11.30 - Bowland North Seminar Room 6

    A PANOPTO recording of this session is now available:
    https://dtu-panopto.lancs.ac.uk/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=9ce99a0c-9e66-4c15-adb3-49c13625ee7f

    Helen Beetham is an independent researcher and consultant in the field of e-Learning. Since 2011 she has worked with projects in the JISC-funded Developing Digital Literacies programme to explore strategic responses to the digital agenda. She works as an adviser to diverse HEIs in the UK, including through HEFCE's Changing the Learning Landscape initiative. A widely published author and keynote speaker, Helen is currently working on a study of students' experiences of the digital environment and developing a digital lens on the UK Professional Standards Framework for university teachers.

    The session explored digital literacies and what this means for our students and how we teach and support their learning.

    Please also see poster for more details

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    Dr Allison Hui: Beyond Pain, Strain & Monotony: Using the Voice in Classroom & Presentation Settings
    Friday 16th May 13.00-14.00

    Abstract:

    The voice is a valuable tool for lecturers and presenters of all types, and yet it is often only addressed when it is seen to have problems. An attention to and knowledge of the voice, however, can not only help to minimize common problems such as vocal fatigue and volume, but also aid in adding aural interest and variety to lectures and presentations.

    This session provided a basic introduction into factors affecting vocal production, including body-voice connection and breathing. These factors will then be linked to the practice of using the voice in classroom and seminar settings. Participants will be given brief opportunities to experiment with their voices, exploring a selection of exercises used by singers and actors for getting in touch with and developing healthy vocal use.

    Session materials are available on this webpage:
    http://www.lancs.ac.uk/hr/oed/cpd/voice.html

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    Last updated: 21/06/13 (SH)

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