Ecostac


PERENNIALS Please note that the following seed list is being used in the first part of the Project and may be subject to change in latter parts of the Project as the work progresses.

Fennel

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare). A familiar naturalised perennial plant, fennel is an excellent nectar provider and is used heavily by hoverflies, parasitic wasps and other pest natural enemies. It is also a beneficial plant for encouraging insect diversity in general and should flower late into the year.

Greater burnet saxifrage

Greater burnet saxifrage (Pimpinella major). Known to be of particular benefit to hoverflies and lacewings, this perennial species should also promote general insect diversity whilst being one of the few native Apiaceae reported as a poor host for carrot root fly.

Yarrow

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Another perennial which should benefit a multitude of insect species in general, including bees, hoverflies, and pest natural enemies.

Perennial Cornflower

Perennial cornflower (Centaurea montana). It is hoped that this naturalised perennial species, with its extra-floral nectaries, will provide all the benefits of the related annual cornflower, but without the need to self-seed each year.

Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare). A perennial familiar in seed margin mixes, this member of the Asteraceae should particularly benefit hoverflies and encourage a range of other insect species.

Bird's Foot Trefoil

Bird's foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus). A good nectar provider and favourite with bees. A range of other insect species are also likely to benefit from the inclusion of this perennial.

Red clover

Red clover (Trifolium pratense). One of two clovers included in the mix which should especially benefit birds, bees and insect diversity in general. As good nectar and pollen providers, clovers may also encourage natural enemies.

White clover

White clover (Trifolium repens). One of two clovers included in the mix which should especially benefit birds, bees and insect diversity in general. As good nectar and pollen providers, clovers may also encourage natural enemies.

Bush vetch

Bush vetch (Vicia sepium). Another good nectar provider, with the added advantage of extra-floral nectaries, this perennial should be especially beneficial to bees, parasitoids and insect predators, whilst also providing resources to encourage general insect diversity and farmland birds.

wild majoram

Oregano / wild majoram (Origanum vulgare). This familiar perennial should be of particular use to both bees and parasitic wasps, whilst also encouraging insect diversity per se with good nectar availability. This species should also provide good ground cover to aid in weed suppression.

Common sorrel

Common sorrel (Rumex acetosa). Although not a great nectar-provider, many insect species should nevertheless benefit from the inclusion of this perennial plant which will still provide pollen and is also likely to prove important for farmland birds.

ANNUALS/BIENNIALS Please note that the following seed list is being used in the first part of the Project and may be subject to change in latter parts of the Project as the work progresses.

Cornflower

Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus). An excellent all-rounder, this species should benefit birds, bees, hoverflies, parasitic wasps and pest natural enemies alike. With the added benefit of extra-floral nectaries it is hoped that this and other annual species will self-seed to form a permanent feature of the sward.

Sunflower

Sunflower (Helianthus annuus). A familiar garden favourite, also grown commercially, this species should encourage birds, bees, hoverflies, parasitic wasps and pest natural enemies. A good nectar and pollen provider, this plant also benefits from the presence of extra-floral nectaries.

Borage

Borage (Borago officinalis). An excellent nectar source and another plant that should benefit a wide range of insects. Bees, hoverflies, parasitic wasps and other natural enemies should all be encouraged by this species, as should farmland birds and insect diversity per se.

Scorpian weed

Scorpion weed (Phacelia tanacetifolia). Noted for its aesthetic appeal, this species is also an excellent provider of nectar. Bees in particular should all make good use of this plant, which can also be expected to benefit farmland birds.

Common vetch

Common vetch (Vicia sativa). As with bush vetch, this species is a good nectar source, also benefitting from extra-floral nectaries. Birds, bees and insect diversity per se should especially benefit from its inclusion.

Red dead nettle

Red dead nettle (Lamium purpureum). A good plant for birds and general insect diversity, the extended flowering season of this species also make it a highly important bee forage plant in Spring.

Yellow rattle

Yellow rattle (Rhinanthus minor). Though a poor plant for pollen provision, this species is nevertheless well utilised by bees and should also benefit general insect diversity. Its hemiparasitic nature should aid in suppressing grass dominance in the sward.

Buckwheat

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum). Another excellent nectar source, thought to further benefit from extra-floral nectaries, this plant also provides abundant pollen. Birds, bees, hoverflies, parasitic wasps and other pest natural enemies should all make good use of this species.

Viper's Bugloss

Viper's bugloss (Echium vulgare). One of only two biennials in the mix and a good provider of nectar, bees and insect diversity per se should especially benefit from its inclusion.

Teasel

Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum). A biennial that should be of particular benefit to birds, whilst also providing good nectar resources favoured by bees. This species should also promote general insect diversity in the sward.

Bishops weed

Bishops weed (Ammi majus). A favourite of hoverflies and other pest natural enemies, this annual is noted for its good overwintering survival which should help it to self-seed well each year.


Copyright 2009 Lorem Ipsum. All Rights Reserved