Learning environment

The programme uses a variety of teaching methods – lectures and discussion, group work, class presentations, computer-based international business games and case studies.

In many sessions there will be a mix of discussion, group exercises and case studies, enabling you to engage with theories and concepts and reflect on how these apply in practice. You will have opportunities to make presentations and to work on a variety of group tasks, both assessed and non-assessed. 

Lively debate is an important element of the learning process, and the interchange of experience and practice from different countries and cultures is central to discovering more about the complexities of international business. The class size is relatively small, allowing for all class members to be active contributors.

For many International Business students, one of the most memorable and enjoyable parts of the learning process is the World Economic Forum simulation. This group simulation exercise forms part of the core International Business module. Here students are given the task of representing different country interests within the WEF. You prepare intensively for a one-day real-time event, where you negotiate on a range of interests, reacting to changing agenda and responses from other nations.

The wide range of subjects covered – and the topicality of the issues under discussion – means that you will be expected to read widely, both in the academic literature and in the world press. The University library, with its extensive range of books, journals and database resources, is an important starting point, and you are likely also to be using a range of other internet-based resources.