Lancaster University RTI Team

Christine Milligan

Christine Milligan is Professor of Health and Social Geography in the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University. She has published extensively around issues of care and mental well-being working closely with older people, informal carers and people experiencing mental ill-health. Christine has taught widely on ethical issues in research and was instrumental in developing the first Faculty Ethics Committee and Ethics Resource at Lancaster University.

Carol Truman

Carole Truman is Professor of Health and Community Studies and Director of the Centre for Research for Health and Wellbeing at the University of Bolton. She has been active in research within community and health contexts for over 20 years and has often worked with groups and individuals who might otherwise be categorised as hard to reach.  Her approach to research has always been to work with or for those who are the subjects of research and because of this, questions of responsibility and accountability within research have been central to her research practice. 

David Archard

David Archard has been Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy at Lancaster University since 2003. Before that he taught at the Universities of Ulster and St Andrews. He has published widely in moral, social, political and legal philosophy, especially on the topics of children, family and state, and the law and sexual morality. He is Honorary Chair of the Society for Applied Philosophy, and the member of the editorial boards of several journals in moral and political philosophy. He is a Member of the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, and currently Chair of that Authority’s Licence Committee, and Ethics and Law Advisory Committee. He is also a member of the North-West Clinical Ethics Committee.

Hazel Biggs

Hazel Biggs is Professor of Healthcare Law and Bioethics at the University of Southampton where she is also is a member of HEAL (Health Ethics and Law) and the Centre for Law, Ethics, and Globalisation (CLEG). Her research has mainly focused on end of life decision-making, human reproduction and the beginning of life, and the ethics and law of healthcare research. Her research takes a socio-legal approach and typically adopts a feminist perspective, broadly construed. She is an editor of Medical Law Review and and a member of the editorial board of Research Ethics Review.

Nayanika Mookherjee

Nayanika Mookherjee  is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University and as the Ethics Officer of the ASA (Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth http://www.theasa.org/) she set up and coordinates a blog - the ASA Globalog (http://blog.theasa.org/ ) to discuss ethical issues. A social anthropologist, with interests and publications in sexual violence during wars; transnational adoption and children and public anthropology (concerning anthropology of politics, state, memory, health and human rights), she has also worked with the Westminister Domestic Violence Forum. As a result, she has extensive experience in conducting ethnographic research and facilitating ethnographic training, particularly concerning sensitive issues relating to war, trauma and violence.

Mairi Levitt

Mairi Levitt I came to Lancaster in 2004 as Deputy Director of CESAGen, an ESRC funded research centre. Before that I was a researcher and then a lecturer at the Centre for Professional Ethics, University of Central Lancashire (1993-2004), a lecturer at the College of St Mark and St John in Plymouth (1981-93) and a course tutor for the Open University (1980-90). In the brief time between being a student and a lecturer I worked for an educational publisher.


Other Contributors

Alison Wilson is a qualified social worker with an MA in Social Work. She has four years experience working directly with drug addiction where heroin has been the drug of choice. She has practiced extensively in a prison setting as a drug counsellor, and as a social worker providing aftercare and housing support services for rehabilitated drug users and their families. She has a substantial practical and theoretical knowledge of heroin use, and an appreciation of the problems of researching this field. She is able to adopt a sensitive and perceptive approach to the needs of this research study and is skilled at dealing with issues of personal relationships, where the crux of the matter has been drug use. Alison is currently conducting ‘Confidential Inquiries’ into drug related deaths and near misses for LDAAT, and running an 18 month evaluation of the Gateway Enterprise Pilot Project at Lancaster Farms Youth Offenders Institute.

Althea Allison Dr is OREC Manager for Thames Valley, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. She is closely involved in the implementation of training strategy for the NHS Central Office of Research Ethics Committees (COREC).

Andrew Dawson is Lecturer in Religious Studies at Lancaster University. Prior to arriving at Lancaster he was at University of Chester where he sat for five years on the university’s Research Ethics Committee. Interested in all aspects of the interface between religion and society, Andrew’s research is centred upon South America, particularly Brazil, where he has been undertaking fieldwork since the early 1990s. He is currently researching new religious movements in Brazil, paying particular attention to religious groups who use the hallucinogen ayahuasca as an integral part of their ritual repertoire.

Anna Daiches is Senior Clinical / Research Tutor (DClinPsy) in the Faculty of Health and Medicine (Division of Health Research), Lancaster University.

Anne Grinyer is a medical sociologist and Senior Lecturer in the Institute for Health Research at Lancaster University. Her research over the last 7 years has focused on the life stage effects of cancer in young adulthood and has resulted in a number of publications including two books. As well as working in an ethically sensitive field, Anne has a theoretical interest in the ethics of research and has published a number of papers on this topic, she also teaches qualitative research methods and research design at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. She is Chair of the FASS Committee on Ethics in Research and also sits on the University’s Ethics Committee.

Brian Wynne is Professor of science studies and Associate Director of the ESRC Centre for Economic and Social Aspects of Genomics, Cesagen, at Lancaster University. As an ex-research scientist, Brian retrained in sociology of science during the 1970s, and has retained his interest in how scientific culture can be developed better to fulfill public needs, globally.  Retrained in academic sociology of scientific knowledge, Brian always pursued this intellectual project for scientific knowledge in public arenas, and has always also played active roles as a science studies researcher, in public policy domains. In 2005-7 he also chaired and produced the expert group report on Science and Governance, for the European Commission, Taking European Knowledge Society Seriously, which contained a chapter on “New Normative Discourses in European Science and Governance: Law and Ethics”  (chapter four, pp 43-54: http://ec.europa.eu/research/science-society/index.cfm?fuseaction=public.topic&id=119 )

Carol Thomas is a sociology Professor in the Institute for Health Research at Lancaster University. Her research falls into two main areas i) disability studies and the sociology of chronic illness, and ii) cancer experiences and end of life care. She is the author of Female Forms: experiencing and understanding disability (Open University Press, 1999) and Sociologies of Disability and Illness. Contested Ideas in Disability Studies and Medical Sociology (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). She is currently working on her ESRC funded project entitled Living and Dying with Cancer: Sociological Perspectives.

Catherine Joynson manages the Nuffield Council on Bioethics' external affairs activities with the aim of raising awareness and promoting discussion of the Council's work. This includes placing stories in the media and dealing with inquiries from journalists. Prior to this she held several science communication roles, for example at the Institute of Biology and for a medical marketing agency.

Charlotte Rennie works for the Offender Health Research Network

Chris Frost is Head of Journalism at Liverpool John Moores University. He has considerable experience in the field of media ethics and regulation having served on the UK Press Council and as a long-term member of the National Union of Journalists. He served on the National Executive Council for many years and was NUJ President in 1992. He chairs the Union’s Ethics Council which debates journalism ethics and has a role in educating NUJ members. He has given evidence to the UK House of Commons select committee on press regulation on several occasions. He is chair of the Association for journalism Education, which represents most schools of journalism in UK and Ireland HE institutions. He is a member of the Higher Education Funding Council’s Research Assessment Exercise sub panel 66 and is also an international panelist on the Australian Research Quality Framework. He has published widely and regularly speaks at international conferences. Recent visits include Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, China, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa and Turkey. He is currently writing a new book on the newspaper industry for publication in September 2009 and a chapter on Media law for a book on the media for publication in 2008. He has refereed academic papers on the themes of ethics and regulation and Journalism education. His most recent book is Frost, C (2007) Journalism Ethics and Self Regulation (2nd Edtn) Harlow: Pearson.

Chris Hatton is Professor of Psychology, Health & Social Care in the Faculty of Health and Medicine (Division of Health Research) at Lancaster University. He is interested in a wide range of research projects concerning people with intellectual disabilities. Areas of current research interest include: evaluating innovations in social policy and practice such as self-directed support; staffing issues; ethnicity, religion and culture in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities and their families; the impact of social context and social inequalities on the physical and mental health of people with intellectual disabilities; and outcome measurement in services for people with intellectual disabilities.

Professor Corinne May-Chahal has recently focused her research on young people and gambling and social impact assessment of changing gambling opportunities. Areview of research on young people and gambling in the UK was published by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport as a technical report Young People and Gambling in Britain. The Lancaster research team, led by Professor May-Chahal, are working in the areas of health and social impact assessment, community impact assessments, gambling, debt and help seeking and developing a public health approach in gambling. They have recently completed a scoping exercise for the DCMS on Assessing the Impact of the Gambling Act, 2005, leading a consortium of researchers including Prof. Rachel Volberg, Prof. Peter Collins, Dr. David Forrest and the Hon. Phillida Bunkle. The final report can be viewed at http://www.culture.gov.uk/reference_library/research_and_statistics/4864.aspx.

Craig Hart and Joan Walker: Being a member of Central England People First has changed my life. I used to live in a residential home where I was not even allowed to have my own mobile phone. Now I live on my own in a shared ownership house.

David Britt is from a background in diagnostic practice, teaching and research in biomedical science in the UK and overseas, David moved to a more administrative role in international health when appointed Health Sciences Consultant to the British Council based inManchester. Following a stroke at the age of 58 that curtailed his professional career, he has taken a keen interest in patient andpublic involvement in NHS activities, especially research.

David Giles is lecturer in Research Methods, in the Institute of Health at Lancaster University. He has broad expertise in research methods but is particularly interested in qualitative methodologies, and helped found the Arnold Journal Qualitative Research in Psychology. In recent years his research has been largely concerned with the influence of the media on human behaviour.

David Sugarman is Professor of Law and Director of the Centre for Law and Society at Lancaster University.   He has published 16 books (encompassing sole authored books, edited and co-edited books and special issues of law reviews); and over 50 articles, essays and review essays.  His principal research in recent years has centred on the local and transnational struggles to bring the former Chilean dictator, Augusto Pinochet, to justice, and their consequences.  He has completed over 300 interviews with victims, NGO’s, judges, lawyers and politicians in 12 countries, and new archival research.   Prof. Sugarman has lectured extensively in the UK and internationally on this research including the Universities of: Oxford (Centre for Latin American Studies and Law Faculty), LSE, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, NYU, Pennsylvania, Texas, ANU, Sydney, Toronto, Paris, Santiago de Chile, Oslo, JNU, Havana, London (Centre for Latin American Studies), the American Society for International Law and the Rockefeller Foundation Centre, Bellagio.    He has acted, and continues to act, as an advisor to several governments and NGO’s on issues of human rights, has acted as a consultant on numerous films about human rights abuses, and has contributed articles on international human rights in the Guardian and the Times.  He was awarded the Lancaster University Teaching Prize 2007 for his development of, and teaching on, “Responses to Massive Violations of Human Rights”. 

Dr Cheryl Simmill-Binningleft her employment as director of training services with a national medical IT company to attend Lancaster University where she gained a first class BA (Hons.) in 1992 and later a PhD. on community and expert risk management. Since then Cheryl has been employed as a full time Research Associate in the Department of Applied Social Science, Lancaster University, and is one of the co-founders and directors of ASSURE (Applied Social Science Unit for Research and Evaluation). During this time she has worked on over thirty commercial contacts covering a wide range of services based in statutory and third sector organisations.

Dr Danielle Griffiths, Manchester University

Dr Gary Young is Chair of Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh LREC and member of NREC advisory group

Dr Hugh McLaughlin is Director of Salford Centre for Social Work Research, University of Salford.

Judith Anders is a PhD student in the Faculty of Health and Medicine (Division of Health Research), Lancaster University.

Dr Libby Bishop is a Senior Research Archivist. She works part-time at the UK Data Archive, University of Essex, as Research Liaison Officer for Qualidata where she focuses on resource development, collection promotion and outreach to the research community. Key areas include creating teaching datasets, consulting with ESRC programmes and centres, advising depositors on preparing data for archiving, and conducting workshops on secondary analysis. Libby also works part-time in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds where she is responsible for creating and developing a new archive of qualitative longitudinal data. The archive is being created as part of the Timescapes Qualitative Longitudinal study which involves the collection and analysis of data on the dynamics of family life and personal relationships across the life course.

Dr Neil Manson is a senior lecturer in the department of philosophy, Lancaster University. Prior to coming to Lancaster in 2005 he studied philosophy in London and Oxford. From 1998 to 2005 he had research fellowships at King's College Cambridge. His main areas of research are in applied philosophy and in philosophy of mind and psychology, including the ethics of communication and information; informed consent; data protection; the nature and significance of genetic information and genetic knowledge. He is the author (with Onora O’Neill) of Rethinking Informed Consent in Biomedical Ethics (Cambridge University Press 2007) and is currently working on a book on unconscious mind, and upon various philosophical problems to do with consent, communication and knowledge in a social context.

Dr Peter Lugosi is senior lecturer at the School of Services Management at Bournemouth University. He completed his doctorate in anthropology and human geography in 2003. His PhD used ethnographic methods to examine the production of hospitable spaces, and bars in particular. Following this he worked as a project manager and research fellow at the Cities Research Institute on several projects concerned with urban planning, transport and social exclusion. His research and publications have focused on hospitality in contemporary society, migration and the migrant experience of hospitality work, drinking cultures, identity, hospitality and urbanity, sexual dissidence and queer culture, research ethics and covert research, tourism, entrepreneurship and organisational culture and consumer participation in commercial hospitality.

Dr Rachel Pain is a social geographer based at Durham University in the UK. Her research interests centre on fear, well-being and social justice. She has worked on participatory action research projects exploring these issues with young people who are homeless, school excluded, young offenders, and most recently young refugees and asylum seekers in north east England. Her current project is examining local risks, hopes and fears in the context of a geopolitical climate where fear is increasingly seen to be globalised.

Garrath Williams, Philosophy, Lancaster (Philosophy Staff Profile Page)

Gita Sahgal is Head of the Gender Unit in Amnesty International. She is a writer, author, broadcaster and a documentary ├×lmmaker. Her latest video is Love Snatched: Forced Marriage and Multiculturalism. She has published numerous articles and books notably ‘Refusing holy orders: Women and fundamentalism in Britain’ (1992), edited with Nira Yuval Davis. London: Virago Press.

Imogen Tyler is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University. Imogen’s research focuses on the intersections of gender, race, and class in the formation of bodies and identities (intersectionality) particularly as regards social exclusion. Interdisciplinarity is a central feature of her methodological approach, which often involves tracking and mapping specific figures, such as the figures of `the asylum seeker` and `white trash' across multiple social and cultural terrains. Her research archive is extensive and has included cinema, photography, news media, new media, political rhetoric, NGO and humanitarian literature and activist materials and practices. She has a special interest in developing new methodological approaches, including visual methodologies and online ethnography. She is currently working on two journal articles on ‘immigrant protest’ in Britain, a special issue of on the theme of Birth and a monograph entitled Crushed: A Theory of Social Abjection.

Martyn Hammersley is Professor in Educational and Social Research, Centre for Childhood, Development and Learning at the Open University

Jane Abbott, Sure Start

Jane Barrett qualified in medicine and has worked in the pharmaceutical industry since 1985, working for large and small pharmaceutical companies and then for a global Contract Research Organisation. She holds a Master’s degree (LLM) in Medical Law, being particularly interested in the legal and ethical aspects of clinical research, and her dissertation was on the use of vulnerable patient groups in research. Jane is the Treasurer of the British Association of Pharmaceutical Physicians, and was until 2006 Registrar of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine. She founded her own consultancy, providing medical and legal expertise to pharmaceutical companies, and is Consultant Medical Adviser and Director to MedicoLegal Investigations Ltd, a UK-based company investigating alleged fraud and misconduct in clinical research.

Jason M Ferdinand is a lecturer in Management at the University of Liverpool. After taking a PhD in Management at Lancaster University he became an ESRC funded researcher at Liverpool, before taking up a faculty position in the Management School. Jason has been involved in a number of UK government sponsored research programmes exploring competitiveness, innovation, organizational learning, and intellectual property crime. Jason’s research is framed by a commitment to critical ethnography informed by Marxist and Critical Realist theory.

Jenny Billings is a researcher and lecturer at the University of Kent's Centre for Health Service Studies (Centre for Health Service Studies Staff Profile Page)

John Gledhill is Max Gluckmann Professor of Social Anthropology at Manchester University. A specialist on Latin America, he has published extensively on ethically complex issues across the ethnic and social class spectrum, and conducted ethnographic fieldwork on regions characterised by high levels of violence, insecurity, and involvement in illegal activities. He is the current Chair of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth (2005–2009), which is responsible for maintenance and updating of the discipline’s Ethical Guidelines, and represents the views of the discipline on matters of controversy in ethical matters.

Julie Hearn is Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Lancaster University. She teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses on the politics of development, specialising in foreign aid, democratization, social policy, civil society, NGOs and social movements. She has undertaken research in Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, South Africa and Argentina. She has been a researcher at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex, undertaken consultancies for the Department of International Development (DFID) and taught at the LSE.

Karen Spencer: Central England People First is an organisation made up of people with learning difficulties. Being labelled a person with a learning difficulty has meant that I have not had the opportunity to do things other people would be able to do. It means that I get treated differently from other people. This includes being sent to a special school where I did not have the opportunity to learn things that other people learnt at school. I do many things for the organisation. I am the Internet Officer which includes being the Web Manager for our web site, writing many of our web pages. I do training and consultancy work as part our organisation's work. More recently I have done a lot more research. Our latest Project “Our Lives, Our Communities” was published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in August.

Lea Esterhuizen has been working as a social research methodologist specialising in the area of ‘sensitive research’ for the past eleven years. During this period she has focused on methodological innovations for projects researching interpersonal and state-sponsored violence alongside refugee perceptions and experiences. She has trained postgraduate students and academics, refugee practitioners and service-providers, NGO researchers and refugees themselves in the concepts and practice of social research methods.

Libby Bishop is a Senior Research Archivist. She works part-time at the UK Data Archive, University of Essex, as Research Liaison Officer for Qualidata where she focuses on resource development, collection promotion and outreach to the research community. Key areas include creating teaching datasets, consulting with ESRC programmes and centres, advising depositors on preparing data for archiving, and conducting workshops on secondary analysis. Libby also works part-time in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds where she is responsible for creating and developing a new archive of qualitative longitudinal data. The archive is being created as part of the Timescapes Qualitative Longitudinal study which involves the collection and analysis of data on the dynamics of family life and personal relationships across the life course.

Professor Lucas Introna is Professor of Organisation, Technology and Ethics in the Lancaster University Management School (Management School Staff Profile Page)

Michael Green is Principal Lecturer in the Department of Journalism, Media and Communications at the University of Central Lancashire

Michal Nahman is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University. She researches scientific practices in the Middle East and Eastern-Europe. She is primarily interested in ethnographic engagement with themes of gender, nationalism, race and borders. Specifically her research has looked at scientific practices of ovum extraction, exchange, fertilisation and implantation. The transnational practices of the ova trade raise many questions relating to national imaginaries as well as imaginaries of race and gender. These are important questions as well for feminism, and what would constitute a feminist politics when encountering contemporary biomedicine.

Nick Gill is Lecturer in political-economic geography at Lancaster University. His research examines forced migration through the lens of contemporary post-structural state theory. His work is informed by qualitative interviews and participant observation. Alongside his research into forced migration, he is currently engaged in an investigation into the material implications of the imagined geographies of Polish migration to the North West. Nick has also been employed as the ethical auditor of the University of Bristol.

Pat Caplan is Emeritus Professor of Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London. She has carried out fieldwork in Tanzania since 1965, Madras/Chennai since 1974, Nepal in 1969, and the UK (especially west Wales) since 1994. She was a founder member of Anthropologists against Ethnic Violence in the 1990s, and has been Chair of the Association of Social Anthropologists (1997-2001). She has written extensively, edited a book entitled 'The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas' (Routledge 2003) and written a number of articles on anthropological ethics. Currently she is Trustee and member of the Board of ActionAid UK.

Paul Lugosi is senior lecturer at the School of Services Management at Bournemouth University. He completed his doctorate in anthropology and human geography in 2003. His PhD used ethnographic methods to examine the production of hospitable spaces, and bars in particular. Following this he worked as a project manager and research fellow at the Cities Research Institute on several projects concerned with urban planning, transport and social exclusion. His research and publications have focused on hospitality in contemporary society, migration and the migrant experience of hospitality work, drinking cultures, identity, hospitality and urbanity, sexual dissidence and queer culture, research ethics and covert research, tourism, entrepreneurship and organisational culture and consumer participation in commercial hospitality.

Paul Oldham is a research associate in ESRC Centre for Economic and Social Aspects of Genomics, Cesagen, at Lancaster University. Dr. Oldham is an anthropologist and his research interests principally focus on the rights of indigenous peoples, intellectual property, genetic resources and the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. He is a regular participant in events under the Convention and serves on the Advisory Board of the International Working Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in relation to this issue.

Robert Johnstone is Chair of Access Matters;  Vice Chair  ASSIST UK;  Member of UK Public Health Association North West steering group;  Director of Midstream, a training and employment provider for disabled people; Chair of People with Arthritis and Rheumatism in Europe; Trustee of the Long term Conditions Alliance

Roger Clough is Emeritus Professor of Social Care, Lancaster University, works independently as researcher and consultant - Eskrigge Social Research. The main focus of his current research and policy interests: best practice in residential care. With a strong belief in involving older people as research partners, he pioneered a university validated research methods course at Lancaster to train older people as research interviewers. He has written extensively on residential work, community care, inspection and abuse.

Rosaleen Duffy is senior lecturer in the Centre for International Politics at Manchester University. She is primarily interested in notions of global governance, global environmental politics, the environmental impact of criminalisation and the politics of tourism. She has conducted research in Belize, Madagascar, Zimbabwa and South Africa and has links with the Smithsonian Elephants and Ethics Group.

Sarah Morris is R&D Manager for User Involvement. She is keen to support the active involvement of members of the public in health research in any way she can. She is based at the Health R&D North West unit at Lancaster, but her 'patch' covers the whole of the North West, right through from Cumbria to Cheshire. She is available as a resource for both health professionals and members of the public who are, or wish to be, involved in health research. She provides workshops and talks on the subject of Public Involvement in Research, and her role also includes facilitating the continuing work of the North West Users Research Advisory Group (NWURAG). She is happy to hear from anyone who needs advice, or who wants to share their experiences around service user involvement.

Shuruq Naguib is lecturer in the Department of Religious Studies at Lancaster University with research interests in the hermeneutics of the Qur’an, contemporary women interpreters of the Qur’an and traditional and contemporary Muslim thought and practice.

Suzanne Ost senior lecturer in law at Lancaster University. She has published in the areas of child pornography, child sexual grooming, euthanasia and the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ programme. She is currently writing a book entitled Child Pornography and Sexual Grooming: Legal and Societal Responses.

Teresa Young is works for Blackpool PCT as Drug Related Death Researcher.

Tim Dant is Reader in the Department of Sociology at University of Lancaster (Sociology Staff Profile Page)

Trevor McMillan is Pro vice chancellor (Research) at the University of Lancaster (LU Vice Chancellor's Office Profile Page)

Victoria Foster, University of Bolton.

Vicky Tyrrell is Press Officer at Lancaster University

 

 

Photographic credits

Home Page

  1. "Poynter Ethics Fellows 2008" by Burnt Pixel. Flickr.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/keithwj/2341227941/

  2. not a puzzle" (Protesters at the Walk Now for Autism fundraiser in Portland, OR.) by Philosophographlux. Flickr.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/philosophography/3959856144/

  3. "Politics + Design" by stephmcg. Flickr.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephmcg/1180421690/