Student Wellbeing Services

Disabilities Service

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Access at Lancaster

Information about services and facilities for applicants and students with disabilities, dyslexia and long-term medical conditions.


Introduction
Advice before you apply
How your application will be treated
General Facilities
Getting Around
Personal Care
Accommodation
Arrival
Who will help when I am studying? http://www.lancs.ac.uk/sbs/download/video/disability.html
Study Support
Examinations and Assessments
Field Trips/Placements/Study Abroad
Financial Support for UK Students
Financial Support for International Students
Feedback
Lancaster students have their say
Support Organisations

For more information about facilities at Lancaster, or to arrange a visit, please get in touch with the Disability Service:

Tel: 01524 592111
Email:disability@lancaster.ac.uk
Contact address: Disability Service, Student Wellbeing Services, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW

 

Introduction

We have been working hard for over twenty years now to provide supportive facilities and a welcoming environment for disabled and dyslexic students. We consult with a wide range of students and staff to find ways to continue making improvements. This guide gives you detailed information about current provision. Make use of it and of us - we are here to help you decide if Lancaster University is the place for you.

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Advice before you arrive

If you have significant support needs, or are unsure whether we can meet your needs, we suggest you contact the Disability Service to discuss these. You may want to arrange a visit in the months before you make a formal application, or extend an open day visit to discuss your individual requirements. If you come in term-time, we can arrange for you to meet students and teaching staff too.

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How your application will be treated

You'll see from our admissions policy above that we make every possible effort to give your application due consideration. Your academic qualifications and capacity to undertake the course are our prime considerations - and these are what the departmental admissions tutor will primarily be looking at. Disabilities Service staff will also see your application and be in touch with you if you have indicated a disability or support needs, either when we receive your application, when your place is confirmed, or shortly after you arrive, depending on the complexity of the arrangements you and we may need to make. For courses where interviews are a regular part of the admissions process, we hold academic interviews separately from discussions about your requirements and how these may be met.

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General Facilities

Campus facilities include a range of shops, cafes and bars. A wide range of films, plays and concerts are held in accessible venues. The Sports Centre will welcome you and help you to find ways to use its facilities. The Centre's swimming pool has accessible changing facilities and a hoist to assist users in and out of the pool.

Campus Health Services include GP facilities including mental health services, sexual health advice, physiotherapy sessions; a private dentist's surgery; and pharmacy. For those who prefer alternative therapies there are a number of natural healthcare practitioners based in the Chaplaincy Centre.

Free, confidential counselling and welfare services are available for all students and the college-based personal tutor system is also available for all undergraduate students. The Graduate Students' Association is also available.

Health and Safety: the Disability Service keeps in close touch with the Safety Office over issues such as fire procedures, lift breakdowns and safety issues connected with the maintenance of accessibility around the campus. Where appropriate, the Safety Office will work with students to develop individual PEEP's (personal emergency evacuation plans).

Information Technology: in computer rooms, particular workstations have been prioritised for disabled students' use. High quality printers and scanners and an optical character recognition system are available to all students. There is also a large screen monitor to help with computer training for partially sighted students.

The Assessment Centre: Lancaster University Assessment Centre can assess computer equipment and other study aids and strategies you may need to gain equal access to the curriculum in your chosen field of study. Further information is available at the Assessment Centre webpage: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/sbs/disabilities/assessmentcentre.htm or by emailing the Assessment Centre assessmentcentre@lancaster.ac.uk

The University Library has two rooms housing a PC with scanner and speech synthesiser, a stand alone Kurzweil Personal Reader and a colour CCTV text enlarger. These rooms may also be used if you need to dictate notes to helpers. To simplify direction finding, the building and contents are colour-coded. By appointment, a member of staff can provide you with one-to-one training and assistance within the Library. This might include helping to retrieve books from the shelves; or by arranging an individual introduction to the computerised catalogue; or by liaising with personal support workers. For further information see website: http://libweb.lancs.ac.uk/g44.htm

Careers: staff are trained in issues relating to disability and employment. There is a range of information for disabled students seeking entry to the graduate job market, including 'Leadership Recruitment', a partnership between Scope and national employers providing paid work experience and development training, and dedicated reference files in the Information Resource. For more information, see http://careers.lancs.ac.uk

Students' Union : the Students' Union Officer for Students with Disabilities provides informal support to disabled students and liaises with University staff. She/he convenes a forum for students with disabilities and college representatives. She/he also represents the rights of disabled students on the Students' Union Council.

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Getting Around

Lancaster 's campus is compact, with pedestrians and traffic well separated. There are ramped routes to all buildings in general use by students, although a few of these are a little longer than routes with stairs and in one or two cases, less well protected from the weather. All teaching departments are accessible, though lifts in some buildings have narrow doors and there are some additional access difficulties for wheelchair users in the Music and Theatre Studies Departments. (Do get in touch to check, though, to find out whether or not these would affect you.) The ground floor areas of residence buildings are accessible. Easy accessible toilet facilities are available in or near most buildings across the campus. A map of campus details accessible routes, lifts and toilets. For more in-depth details about accessibility in different parts of the university campus see the DisabledGo website for Lancaster University.

We can put you in touch with local Social Services Mobility Officers and Guide Dogs for the Blind who can provide mobility training immediately before the start of your course or during a visit in the summer.

The campus is three miles from Lancaster 's city centre. There is an accessible bus service covering the centre and south end of the campus. There are accessible taxis. We continue to work with local transport providers to improve the accessibility of public transport.

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Personal Care

The University is not responsible for organising personal care for students but the Disability Service will help to provide information and advice about personal care support options. We will liaise with relevant departments across the university to ensure your support needs are met, including facilitating any accommodation adaptations and increasing the accessibility of the campus.

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Accommodation

Accommodation accessible to wheelchair users, with accessible kitchen and bathroom facilities is available, integrated with other student accommodation in six of the nine residential colleges. Other larger than usual study bedrooms are also available for disabled students with particular requirements. We may also be able to make adaptations to suit your individual requirements . Where it is appropriate we usually invite applicants to visit in the Spring or Summer before arrival to consider necessary adaptations with an occupational therapist or a social worker and a member of staff. These will then be done before the beginning of term, in time for your arrival. Where appropriate we can install flashing light fire alarms and doorbells for deaf students. For some students we can make arrangements for a room on campus to be available throughout their course.

If you have a need to store prescribed medication, it may be possible to bring a small fridge to store it seperately from the kitchen food fridges. Please speak to the Disabilities Advisor or College Residence Officer about this.

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Arrival

If you would like to arrive a day or so early in order to find your way around the campus and to get to know new helpers, we can arrange this.

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Who will help when I am studying?

You probably know that study at university is a much more independent process than at school or college. Our aim is to support you in becoming a successful independent learner and in the next few paragraphs we describe some of the ways you and we can make sure that happens. All of it depends, though, on you being pro-active in making contact with the Disability Service or other support services, and on you responding to requests for information. If that happens, this is what you can expect:

We send information about your support needs to academic departments so they and you can deal with practical issues to do with your courses. All staff have access to information about teaching students with disabilities and can attend additional related courses.

After you arrive at Lancaster , staff in the Disability Service will provide general support, especially at the start of your course, help you with applications for Disabled Students' Allowances (DSA) for equipment and personal support where relevant, and with your help, ensure that you have access to suitable examination and assessment arrangements.

During your time at Lancaster , you will receive a regular email bulletin to keep you in touch with current issues, and to remind you about issues such as booking campus accommodation, making sure your exam arrangements are in place, and specialist careers information. The Disability Service can put you in touch with an agency providing readers, note-taking support, sign language interpretation or extra one-to-one language tuition. Induction loops are available in all lecture theatres and main teaching rooms.

http://www.lancs.ac.uk/sbs/download/video/disability.html

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Study Support

Student Learning Advisors are available in each faculty. If you are eligible for DSA, you may be provided with funds for your own study support tutors.

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Examinations and Assessments

We aim to ensure that you can demonstrate your ability in exams and assessments by ensuring that you are not put at a disadvantage compared with other students. We will look at your needs individually and make arrangements in consultation with you and your academic departments.

Arrangements we often make are for extra time, use of word processor, use of a scribe, enlarged or brailled exam papers. If you are dyslexic, you must have a recent assessment from an educational psychologist or other qualified practitioner, to qualify for alternative arrangements. This must have been carried out post age 16, by an appropriately qualified assessor, and be relevant to your study at university level.

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Field trips, Placements, Study abroad

The departments concerned have some experience of supporting students on work/study outside the University campus. They do everything possible themselves and with other agencies concerned to put appropriate arrangements in place.

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Financial support for UK students

If you are an undergraduate/postgraduate full-time or part-time British student, you may qualify for Disabled Students' Allowances from Student Finance England, to cover the cost of any additional equipment and human support related to studying and your disability- related needs. These allowances are not means-tested. Extra travel costs may also be available because of a disability, but not general everyday travel costs. Students supported by funding councils may also be eligible for DSA. We can offer information, assistance and advice about applications for Disabled Students' Allowances. The Students' Union Advice Centre also offers information and advice about benefits you may be entitled to.

If you are not eligible for Disabled Students' Allowances you may able to borrow computing and other equipment from our small stock.

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Financial support for International Students

If you are likely to have extra costs for

•  specialist study equipment

•  personal study support, such as a note-taker

•  personal support for ordinary daily activities

It is important that you clarify where the funds will come from to cover these costs. It may be that your home country or institution can help. Please remember that labour costs in the UK are high compared to some countries and take account of this when planning your budget. You may have an award from an organisation such as the British Council, which you can approach for additional support. You can also apply to the University for a grant which may cover some or all of your study related costs. It may also be possible to borrow computing or other equipment from the Disabilities Service. Some of these arrangements take a long time to organise, so it is important to get in touch with the Disabilities Service Adviser as early as possible to start the process. We regret that it is unlikely we will be able to pay for help with day- to-day tasks (for example, shopping or doing laundry).

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Feedback

It is important for us to know if you feel you are not getting a satisfactory service from University staff. We run an annual feedback survey to evaluate the Disability Service, but we welcome comments and feedback about the service at any time of the year. To provide feedback please contact the Disability Service on 015245 92111 or email disability@lancaster.ac.uk

For general advice about making a university complaint see: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/sbs/welfare/complaintsandappeals.htm

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Lancaster students have their say

Here is what students say about us:

“I have been deaf in one ear since the age of 18 months and coming to university posed a few concerns regarding my safety at night with hearing fire alarms and also in hearing lectures. I thought I would see how things went on first arriving at University and so didn't seek help until I was already here.

After attending the first week of lectures, I realised that taking notes and hearing everything in the lecture was becoming increasingly difficult and so I made an appointment to speak to the student adviser about the difficulties I had encountered. The advice and support from them was fantastic and they pointed me in the right direction for advice on equipment and funding for additional support.

The help the university has provided for me has been outstanding and has really helped me progress through my studies at Lancaster . The support from the university has been there for me when I needed them most and it helps to reassure students that help is available and that it will continue throughout their degree.”

Rebecca Tebay, Psychology

I am a mature student taking the part-time MA Creative Writing programme. After being accepted on the course, the arthritic conditions that led to my early retirement flared up. Despite two operations and various palliative treatments for my hands, I was struggling when I contacted Student Support in the first term. Here I was, a writer who couldn't hold a pen! How could I manage the weekly written requirements of my course, let alone the final portfolio of 30,000 words? Assessment provided me with a new computer, training and a raft of aids. Further health problems meant I had to take a gap year. Although frustrating, intercalation has made me get to grips with the new equipment and improve my health, largely thanks to frequent Pilates sessions.

I'm back and really enjoying the course. My department and fellow students have been so supportive, even acting as scribes in seminars.

Both an automatic car and a disabled parking slot have made the journey manageable. LUVLE helps. I'm in the middle of an online conference, so I'm part of a seminar group without even leaving the house. The paperwork for the Disabled Students Allowance is daunting and you do have to be proactive, but Student Support is always on hand.

Rachel Rycroft, English and Creative Writing

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Support Organisations

Useful regional and national disability organisations:

• National Autistic Society

• National Association of Disability Practitioners (NADP)

• RNIB

• British Dyslexia Association

• National Network of Assessment Centres

• Disability Rights Team

 

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