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Biological Pesticides Against Insect Crop Pests in Asia and Africa: Turning Research Into Use in Developing Countries

Dr David Grzywacz, University of Greenwich, UK

Wednesday 28 April 2010, 1600-1700
Furness Lecture Theatre 2

Centre for Sustainable Agriculture Seminar

Insect viruses have been conceived as promising biological pesticides with real potential for providing safe, environmentally friendly and sustainable insect pest control, especially in the developing countries of Asia and Africa. The Baculoviruses (BV) are highly infectious and lethal pathogens of two of the most important global crop pests Helicoverpa armigera (old world bollworm) and Plutella xylostella (diamond back moth). Research on the baculoviruses of these two species has shown that the BV of these species can be used as effectively as insecticides to control these pests. However the process of moving from laboratory and field research to developing, producing and promoting these as biopesticides in Asia and Africa throws up a wide range of significant challenges that illustrate the many facets of taking research knowledge and bringing it into use. This talk will focus on discussing the scientific, technical, legal, institutional and economic issues inherent in bringing this promising research into use as a case study of how science moves from laboratory into the real world.