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Lancaster Environment Centre hosts meeting on ozone depletion and increased UV radiation

Story supplied by LU Press Office

International experts focused on the effects of ozone depletion and increased UV radiation International experts focused on the effects of ozone depletion and increased UV radiation

More than 40 scientists from 20 countries will produce a report focussing on the effects of ozone depletion and increased UV radiation following a meeting at Lancaster University's Environment Centre. The report will include sections on:

  • Effects on human health (panel lead Prof Mary Norval)
  • Effects on crops, terrestrial and marine ecosystems (panel leads Professor Carlos Ballare (terrestrial) and Professor Donat Hader (marine))
  • The global-scale processes that cycle carbon and determine the chemistry of the atmosphere (panel leads Dr Richard Zepp, Dr Keith Solomon)

The report is produced under the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer. The Montreal protocol formally requires that every four years a report is produced which assesses progress in understanding on ozone depletion and increased UV radiation.

Marco Gonzalez the chief executive secretary of the UN Ozone Secretariat will be attending part of the meeting.

The meeting also marks the retirement as panel co-chair of Professor Jan van der Leun, widely recognised for driving progress in understanding the effects of ozone depletion of human health during his long career.

Professor Nigel Paul from the Lancaster Environment Centre said: "The Montreal Protocol has become the most successful global response to a global environmental problem.

"The Protocol has been universally ratified by all 196 nation states whose concerted action over the last two decades has reduced the emissions of ozone depleting substances to less than 1% of that in the late 1980s.

"This successfully avoided disastrous damage to the ozone layer that would have affected the whole planet."

Thu 26 August 2010

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