Seminars & Workshops

Dr Adrian Venables - January 2019

The Relationship between Cyber Operations, Signals Intelligence and Electronic Warefare

Dr Adrian Venables is a Commander in the Royal Naval Reserve, independent cyber security consultant and honorary researcher at Lancaster University, he has worked for both government and industry clients advising on computer security, including a part time role at the UK’s Defence Cyber School

Date: 31st January 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm
Location: TBC

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

The military’s definition of cyberspace has evolved as technology has developed and new uses have been found to exploit this domain of warfare. Initially regarded as a physical infrastructure connecting mostly static hardware, it now encompasses mobile wireless networks communicating through the Radio Frequency (RF) spectrum. This emerging dependence on the electromagnetic environment has led to the term CEMA – Cyber and electromagnetic activities being introduced. This has in turn has resulted in the convergence of cyberspace operations with the already mature disciplines of Signals Intelligence and Electronic Warfare. As elements of these three previously independent warfare areas merge, their previously understood effects and roles need to be reassessed to ensure that they can fully exploit and realise their potential in future military operations.

Bio: 

Dr Adrian Venables, served in the Royal Navy for 24 years as a Communications, Warfare, and Intelligence officer and was responsible for the provision and security of a range of Information Systems worldwide, including the management of specialist teams deployed to operational theatres.

Since leaving the Service, he has published a series of journal articles and research papers on the cyber threat landscape and its use by state and non-state actors for espionage, sabotage, and subversion within the maritime environment. A Certified Information System Security Professional and Certified Information System Manager, he holds seven computing and cyber security based degrees and is a Chartered Information Technology Professional Fellow of the British Computing Society, Chartered Engineer Member of the Institution of Engineering Technology and Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute.

More about the Defence Cyber School can be found here:

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details.

 

Superintendent Justin Srivastave - December 2018

Police Leadership & Vulnerability Demand

Superintendent Justin Srivastava of Lancashire Constabulary joins us for our December Seminar Series, talking about Police Leadership & Vulnerability Demand: Are current models of Police leadership fit for purpose in light of changing demand around vulnerability?

Date: 13th December 2018

Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm

Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. 

Superintendent Justin Srivastava of Lancashire Constabulary join us for our December Seminar Series, talking about Police Leadership & Vulnerability Demand: Are current models of Police leadership fit for purpose in light of changing demand around vulnerability?

This exploratory study examines whether the current models of police leadership are fit for purpose in light of the complex and changing demands around policing vulnerability. A qualitative approach was utilised whereby seven semi-structured interviews were undertaken with senior leadership in UK/USA policing as they have the strongest influence on organisational culture in terms of developing future leaders (West, et al., 2014; Bauer, 2006).

The majority of participants felt that although there is a multitude of models of leadership across policing; none of them were designed to address vulnerability. A similar theme was identified in the literature suggesting that current leadership models were founded on aspirations and perceptions rather than a formalised skill base reflecting upstream, collaborative principles.

The study suggested the need for further research to look at a competency based approach towards policing the vulnerability agenda. Key skills for this approach would include: managing the police culture, emotional intelligence, intellect, compassion, empathy and developing a flexible and adaptable workforce. The study also found that the majority of the participants had experienced personal trauma that had influenced their leadership style across the vulnerability agenda.

 

Biography

Justin is a serving officer with Lancashire Constabulary. Since 2016, he has been the national lead for the National Police Chiefs Council and Chief Constable Andy Rhodes on the national Police and Health Consensus. This work involved the examination of how policing and health/social care partners can improve how they work together and address vulnerability demand. In February 2018, Justin was also appointed as senior implementation manager for the National Police Wellbeing Programme.

Prior to this Justin served in uniform and detective roles across Lancashire. He has been involved in developing and implementing the East Lancashire approach to Early Action and Early Intervention known as “Transforming Lives”. This multi-agency approach is based on developing a single point of entry for non-statutory interventions (step down), creating multi-disciplinary teams based in local communities and intervening with people with complex - Security needs who create demand for public and third sector organisations. Transforming Lives” is now being rolled out across the Lancashire area and has been nationally recognised by HMIC as good practice. In 2017, Justin graduated with an MSc course in “Early Action and Professional Practice” from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) specialising in Adverse Childhood Experiences, leadership within an integrated partnership environment and developing learning organisations.

Prior to this, Justin was a Detective Chief Inspector and the Deputy Head of Public Protection for Lancashire Constabulary. His work included policy making, development and compliance for the Constabulary. Justin was the Constabulary lead on a number of portfolios including Safeguarding Children, Infant Death, Forced Marriage and Domestic Abuse. Justin has previously served in the ranks of Detective Constable, Detective Sergeant and Detective Inspector, DCI and Temp Detective Supt. on the Public Protection Units, and has worked on several high profile child murders within the Force Major Investigation Team (FMIT).Prior to joining Lancashire Constabulary, Justin worked on the National Crime Squad for England and Wales which involved the investigation of international drug smuggling, child trafficking and money laundering and he has previously served with Surrey and Humberside Police.

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop in on the day, join the seminar and meet with Justin after with tea, coffee and biscuits. For catering purposes, please register your attendance by emailing securitylancaster@lancaster.ac.uk

Prof Mark Levine - November 2018

Violence and its Discontents: groups and identities in security research

Mark Levine is a Professor of Social Psychology at Exeter University. His research focuses on the role of identities and group processes in pro-social and anti-social behavior. In this talk Mark will examine the ways in which the social psychology of groups and identities can contribute to the analysis of behaviour in the security domain. 

Date: 29th November 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm
Location: D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

This seminar will describe a number of projects that use naturally occurring digital data as a way of studying security related behaviour. This will include an analysis of CCTV footage of aggression and violence in public space. Mark will argue that this work points to the importance of understanding how third parties shape the trajectories of aggression to violence. Mark will also talk about an analysis of naturally occurring language in online spaces – and how this can be leveraged for studying the impact of identity processes as they relate to violence and crime.

Bio:

Mark is a Professor of Social Psychology at Exeter University. His research focuses on the role of identities and group processes in pro-social and anti-social behavior. He is particularly interested in the research possibilities afforded by new technologies and digital data. This has included systematic behavioural analysis of CCTV footage of real life violent incidents in public spaces in Britain, Netherlands, Denmark and South Africa. He has also used Immersive Virtual Environments to study the behaviour of bystanders in violent emergencies. More recently he has been using natural language processing of online data to explore how group processes can shape privacy concerns and privacy behaviour. He is also interested in exploring the utility of tracking and sensing technologies to examine interactions in public places.

Insp Christina Shorrock & Christy Frampton - October 2018

Vulnerable Caller Initiative

Insp Christina Shorrock & Christy Frampton of Lancashire Constabulary join us for our October Seminar Series, talking about their Vulnerable Caller Initiative.

Date: 25th October 2018

Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm

Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

 

Insp Christina Shorrock & Christy Frampton of Lancashire Constabulary join us for our October Seminar Series, talking about their Vulnerable Caller Initiative.

Only 17% of calls to the UK police relate to crime and, of the remainder, those calls relating to public safety and welfare are rising significantly. The police are increasingly being viewed as an accessible service, providing wider social support, and being free at the point of access.

This study analyses and looks at new methods to respond to 1,546 high intensive callers, who made multiple requests for police help (one of whom called the police 94 times in a month). This study shows how members of an ‘Early Action Team’ analysed individual vulnerability and need, as well as how multi-agency responses were tailored to this need. An impact evaluation found that calls were reduced by 26% and police deployments by 6%. The study will also show the factors aligned with successful intervention.

 

Christina Shorrock

Christina joined Lancashire Constabulary in 1997 and has performed a variety of roles across the Constabulary, both operational and partnership based. She is a Police Inspector currently working on the strategic Early Action team. This involves negotiating and influencing partners across a wide range of public services and specifically building productive relationships with strategic individuals in partner agencies, which is absolutely vital to the overall delivery of the Early Action agenda and Public Service Lancashire.

 

Christy Frampton

Christy is a Force Intelligence Analyst who joined the constabulary in 2008 and has completed a number of analytical roles from Community Safety Partnership Analyst and Early Action Analyst. Her roles have required effective partnership working, advanced analytical abilities and proven project management skills. Christy recently has been the working closely with the local university evaluation team (UCLAN) for the evaluation of the Early Action Projects undertaken by the Lancashire Police. This successful partnership has led to a greater understanding of the projects and processes and is integral to the future of the force to ensure success in the Early Action agenda going forward.

 

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop in on the day, join the seminar and meet with Christina & Christy after with tea, coffee and biscuits. For catering purposes, please register your attendance by emailing securitylancaster@lancaster.ac.uk

Erin Gibbs Van Brunschot - September 2018

Crime Journies: High-Risk Offending Across Space and Time

The study of crime over the life course emphasizes the location of individuals in space and time. In this paper, we examine those identified by the courts as ‘high-risk’ and consider their offending trajectories over a number of years. 

Date: 27th Sept 2018

Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm

Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. 

High-risk individuals tend to have criminal records reflecting prolific and/or serious offending occurring over both short and long periods of time, as well as occurring in a number of geographic locations. While official criminal records often capture only a portion of criminal activity, the spatial and temporal locations of high-risk offenders’ convictions and charges provide insight into individuals’ lives and associated stability and change over offending histories. We consider if and how spatial and temporal locations of offenses as detailed in official criminal records influence the length, frequency and types of crimes characterizing high-risk offending careers. Our investigation examines stability and change in offense location (via convictions and charges) over time within individuals’ offending careers. We also consider the spatial and temporal clustering of offenses across individuals in order to identify patterns associated with offending among this selection of offenders. We examine data from the official criminal records associated with individuals identified as high-risk offenders by a municipal police force in a large Canadian city. Future research and policy implications are considered. 

Bio:

Erin Gibbs Van Brunschot is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary. Her research interests lie in the study of risk as it applies to the realms of security, policing, offending and victimization. She is co-author of two books with Leslie Kennedy, Risk Balance and Security (2008 Sage) and The Risk in Crime (2009 Rowman and Littlefield). Risk Balance examines the agency perspective on a variety of hazards across contexts while The Risk in Crime examines the concept of risk in crime theory. Erin’s more recent work focuses on high-risk offenders from a life-course perspective and the management of these offenders from a policing and policy perspective. Related to this is her examination of various applications of technology, such as global positioning system (GPS) monitoring and body-worn cameras (BWCs), as means of reducing the risk of offending and improving security.

 

Miranda Mowbray - July 2018

Machine learning for Cyber Security

Dr Miranda Mowbray is a Lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Bristol, and joins us for our July Seminar Series, talking about some of the difficulties with using machine learning for detecting cyber security attacks on enterprise networks.

Date: 26th July 2018

Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm

Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

 

Miranda's talk will talk about some of the difficulties with using machine learning for detecting cyber security attacks on enterprise networks, and ways to address them. The seminar will also talk about a successful application of machine learning for cyber security, using both supervised and unsupervised learning to detect some previously-unknown malware.

Mini-bio: Miranda Mowbray is a lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Bristol, where her research interests include cyber security and big data ethics. Most of her career has been in industrial research, at HP. Her PhD is in Mathematics, from London University. She is a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details. 

Cath Goulding - May 2018

DNS - what's in a name?

Cath Goulding, Head of Cyber Security for Nominet UK, the company best known for running the .uk domain name registry, joins our Seminar Series to talk about how DNS works, and the cyber threats it faces.

Date: 17th May 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm
Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

Cath Goulding is Head of Cyber Security for Nominet UK, the company best known for running the .uk domain name registry.

Since 1996, Nominet has managed and run domain names that end in .uk and are now one of the worlds largest country code registries. With over 3m businesses, and millions more customers who rely on their domain registry services, Nominet is the UK’s official country-code domain. The Domain Name System (DNS) is critical to the operations of the Internet and this talk will outline how DNS works and the cyber threats it faces. Cath will also give insight into her career and outline some of the lessons she has learnt along the way.

Bio:

Cath Goulding

Head of Cyber Security, Nominet UK and Board member of the Women’s Security Society

Cath has 18 years’ experience in the cyber security profession having worked for both UK Government and the private sector. A thought leader in her field, she frequently speaks at security and internet conferences and has provided articles and comments for multiple publications. Her career was profiled in the Financial Times and she has appeared on the BBC promoting women into the IT profession.

Cath currently works as Head of Cyber Security for Nominet UK, the internet company best known for running the ‘dot.uk’ registry and therefore critical to internet operations in the UK. Prior to joining Nominet, Cath worked at GCHQ holding a variety of posts in the field of cyber security. Cath has a BSc in Mathematics, an MSc in Human Computer Interaction and is CISSP qualified. She was awarded Security Champion at the Women in IT awards 2015 and sits on the board of the Women’s Security Society..

Phil Warren - April 2018

Shipping containers, Russian criminals, American Spooks and Nuclear Weapons’: an intelligence-led case study of a cyber breach.

Phil Warren, Deputy Chief Information Security Officer at the Bank of England talks about the NotPetya cyber breach, the impact of these attacks and what we can learn.

Date: 26th April 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm
Location: InfoLab 21, D55

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

The NotPetya cyber breach destroyed thousands of servers, PCs and applications and cost businesses hundreds of millions of pounds. The impact of these attacks can be deconstructed and traced through a murky world of criminality and hostile state-sponsored activities. However, what can we learn from this episode?

  • Why there will be more of this activity to come
  • How attackers lost control
  • The challenge of attributing cyber-attacks and what we ‘don’t know’,
  • What we can do about it       

 

Bio:

Phil Warren is the Deputy Chief Information Security Officer at the Bank of England. Phil deputies for and runs many of the operations on behalf of the CISO against the broad portfolio of the Bank’s cyber mission: intelligence, investigations, policy, governance, risk, compliance, education and innovation. Phil is currently involved in a number of specific pieces of work aimed at developing cyber maturity in the Bank and sector: including the Bank’s internal enterprise-wide mitigation strategy, the renewal of RTGS and Project STRIDER, which aims to increase collaboration across the sector for cyber incident response. Phil is also part of the Bank’s privacy work – supporting the implementation of changes to meet GDPR compliance in May 2018. Prior to joining the Bank in 2014, Phil spent 10 years in government supporting national security requirements including cyber defence.

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details.

Dr Adrian Venables - January 2019

The Relationship between Cyber Operations, Signals Intelligence and Electronic Warefare

Dr Adrian Venables is a Commander in the Royal Naval Reserve, independent cyber security consultant and honorary researcher at Lancaster University, he has worked for both government and industry clients advising on computer security, including a part time role at the UK’s Defence Cyber School

Date: 31st January 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.30pm
Location: TBC

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

The military’s definition of cyberspace has evolved as technology has developed and new uses have been found to exploit this domain of warfare. Initially regarded as a physical infrastructure connecting mostly static hardware, it now encompasses mobile wireless networks communicating through the Radio Frequency (RF) spectrum. This emerging dependence on the electromagnetic environment has led to the term CEMA – Cyber and electromagnetic activities being introduced. This has in turn has resulted in the convergence of cyberspace operations with the already mature disciplines of Signals Intelligence and Electronic Warfare. As elements of these three previously independent warfare areas merge, their previously understood effects and roles need to be reassessed to ensure that they can fully exploit and realise their potential in future military operations. Bio: 

Dr Adrian Venables, served in the Royal Navy for 24 years as a Communications, Warfare, and Intelligence officer and was responsible for the provision and security of a range of Information Systems worldwide, including the management of specialist teams deployed to operational theatres.

Since leaving the Service, he has published a series of journal articles and research papers on the cyber threat landscape and its use by state and non-state actors for espionage, sabotage, and subversion within the maritime environment. A Certified Information System Security Professional and Certified Information System Manager, he holds seven computing and cyber security based degrees and is a Chartered Information Technology Professional Fellow of the British Computing Society, Chartered Engineer Member of the Institution of Engineering Technology and Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute.

More about the Defence Cyber School can be found here:

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details.

 

Dr Budi Arief - January 2018

Earworms Make Bad Password: An Analysis of the Noke Smart Lock Manual Override.

Budi Arief, Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing at the University of Kent, presents a security analysis of the manual override feature of the Noke smart lock. 

Date: 25th January 2018
Time: 13.00pm - 14.00pm
Location: Infolab21, C60b/c

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to make lives more comfortable and effortless, through various assistive products and services built using small, wireless devices; for example, to enable personalised services (in which the user gets their environment configured and presented to their preference) or multi-factor effortless and continuous authentication (where the user does not need to remember burdensome passwords but uses instead biometrics and other wearable tokens). However, these devices could also pose new large-scale privacy and security risks that are not properly understood yet, and constitute an ongoing research challenge.

This talk presents a security analysis of the manual override feature of the Noke smart lock. The Noke smart lock allows its user to operate, monitor and even share his smart lock with others through a smartphone. To counter the risk of being unable to open the lock when the smartphone is unavailable, it provides an override mechanism. Noke implements this override feature using a quick-click scheme, whereby its user can choose a sequence of eight to sixteen short and long shackle presses (similar to a Morse code).

Bio:

Budi Arief is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research interests are in cybercrime, the security and dependability of computer-based systems, cyber security education, and the Internet of Things, with a strong overarching element of interdisciplinary research. His current work focuses on the socio-technical aspects of ransomware, as part of the EPSRC EMPHASIS (EconoMical, PsycHologicAl and Societal Impact of RanSomware) project. He obtained his B.Sc. in Computing Science (First Class) and Ph.D. in Computing Science, both from Newcastle University. Prior to joining the University of Kent, Budi was a Senior Research Associate in the School of Computing Science at Newcastle University.

More about Budi Arief can be found here:

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details.

 

 

Professor Aggelos Kiayias - November 2017

Proof of Stake Blockchain Protocols

Join us as Professor Kiayias presents recent results in the design and analysis of stake blockchain protocols. The talk covers the design strategy behind Ouroboros and Ouroboros Praos, as well as analyzing the concept of forkable strings & string divergence which is at the core of the security analysis. 

Date: 30th November 2017
Time: 14.00pm - 15.00pm
Location: InfoLab21, D55.

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. ‌

We present recent results in the design and analysis of proof of stake blockchain protocols. The talk will cover the design strategy behind Ouroboros and Ouroboros Praos, as well as we will introduce and analyse the concept of forkable strings as well as string divergence which is at the core of the security analysis. The security analysis covers both the synchronous and partial synchronous model as well as static, delayed and fully adaptive corruptions.

Bio:

Aggelos Kiayias is chair in Cyber Security and Privacy and director of the Blockchain Technology Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh.

He is also the Chief Scientist at blockchain technology company IOHK. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. 

His research has been funded by the Horizon 2020 programme (EU), the European Research Council (EU), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (UK), the Secretariat of Research and Technology (Greece), the National Science Foundation (USA), the Department of Homeland Security (USA), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA).

He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Mathematics department of the University of Athens. He has over 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. He currently serves as the program chair of the Financial Cryptography and Data Security conference 2017. 

Find out more here:

The Seminar Series is open to all, so please feel free to drop-in on the day, or register your interest by contacting Paul Bennett for more details. 

Dr Pete Burnap - October 2017

Real Time Prediction of Drive By Download Attacks on Twitter.

Join Dr Pete Burnap from Cardiff University as he delivers his seminar on "the Real Time Prediction of Drive By Download Attacks on Twitter", where he explores his research of online social networks (ONS) and propagation of malicious or potentially dangerous content, leading to the risk of drive-by-downloads.

Date: 26th October 2017
Time: 14.00pm - 15.00pm
Location: Infolab21, C60b/c

Followed by Tea, Coffee & Biscuits. 

Our previous research has studied online social networks (ONSs) and propagation of malicious or potentially dangerous content (e.g. hate speech, suicidal ideation). People use online social media to find information about events in real-time (619k tweets per minute during FIFA world cup final) and cyber criminals take advantage of this to launch surreptitious attacks by posting links to malicious Web sites, leading to the risk of drive-by-downloads - URLs pointing to malicious servers but hidden in attractive content 

Bio:

I am a Reader (Associate Professor) in Data Science & Cyber Analytics at Cardiff University. I lead the Social Computing research priority area in the School of Computer Science & Informatics’ Complex Systems research group. I have developed a reputation for data-driven, innovative, and interdisciplinary research that broadly contributes to the growing field of Data Science, working closely with the Cardiff School of Social Sciences and School of Engineering. I am an applied computer scientist with a principal focus on data and computational methods to improve understanding, operations and decision making outside of academia, while contributing to the academic fields of Social ComputingWeb Science and Cybersecurity.

These three fields are integrated within my research through the  analysis and understanding of Web-enabled human and software behaviour, with a particular interest in emerging and future risks posed to civil society, business (economies) and governments. I achieve this using computational methods such as machine learning and statistical data modelling, and interaction and behaviour mining, opinion mining and sentiment analysis to derive key features of interest.

My research outcomes, which include more than 60 academic articles – stemming from funded research projects worth over £10 million, are organised and disseminated via two research units:

The Social Data Science Lab, within which I am a director and the computational lead. The Lab’s core funding comes from a £450k ESRC grant and it forms part of the £64m ‘Big Data Network’. Core funding runs between 2017 and 2020, during which time the Lab will host 3 post-doctoral researchers and 9 PhD students, all studying topics related to Risk, Safety & Human/Cybersecurity.

The Airbus Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Analytics, within which I am the director. The centre works across industry, academia and government to provide a focus for cyber security analytics in the UK. Cyber security is a priority research area at Cardiff University, supported with strategic investment. Since 2012 we have established an interdisciplinary research team of technical and social researchers. Our collaborative projects have received more than £5m in funding from UK Research Councils (EPSRC, ESRC), Welsh Government (Endeavr Wales) and Industry (Airbus).