Summary

The Future of Security and Protection Science Conference is bringing together academics, businesses and other ogranisations in order to discuss how what we are doing now will shape the way we see security and protection in the future.

The conference provides a series of thought provoking presenations in order to explore the future of technology, culture and individual within an ever increasing risk adverse, and security concisous society. It will explore the intersection between technology infrastucture and society and the impact that this has on perceptions on security and technology development.

 

Agenda

  • 9:45 - Arrival, Coffee and Networking
  • 10:15 - Welcome by Dr Daniel Prince
  • 10:25 - Session 1: Cyber Security
  • Cyber security is presenting a major global problem. The omnipresent interconnectivity permeates our daily lives and is impacting us in unpredictable ways, from supporting civilian uprisings and facilitating rapid financial collapses to providing innovation and new ways to create business. The session will explore the future of some of these areas in order to explore where we may be heading.
  • Speakers:
    • Prof Awais Rashid - Who Am I: Identity, Trust and Influence in Cyber Space: Security Lancaster
    • Dr Andreas Mauthe - Is there too much complacency about network attacks?: Security Lancaster
    • A survey of over 250 security experts has revealed that the main concerns regarding threats to the networking infrastructure are related to malicious network traffic attacks and social engineering. Threats to the physical infrastructure are deemed to be low risk. In this presentation we briefly look at the survey results and subsequently discuss if there might be too much complacency towards infrastructure risks using a case study on network vulnerabilities of the Sprint network infrastructure in the US
    • Dr Jose M. Such - Privacy policy negotiation in future Social Networking Services: Security Lancaster
    • The use of social networking services (SNSs) such as Facebook has explosively grown in the last decade. Despite their success, most users state being either 'concerned' or 'very concerned' about their privacy when using these services in surveys. Recently, methods have been proposed to enhance privacy in future SNSs, but these only deal with supporting single user's decisions of whether or not to grant access to particular items. However, social networks involve many shared items, such as photos, that may concern more than one user, e.g., a photo that depicts different several users, so that the privacy preferences of all of the users depicted should be respected. In this talk, we will firstly introduce the privacy problems that current SNS have and the challenges for solving them in future SNS. Then, we will focus one such challenges that is the problem of shared items and, in particular, on automated methods to reach agreements on privacy policies for that items.
    • Mr Glyn Jones - Lost in Cyberspace? : Thales
    • Maintaining security in cyber space is a complex undertaking. This talk proposes a simple model of the research space involved. Examples from research at Thales UK are used to illustrate the model and some observations are offered on the nature of the problems to be solved.
  • 11:30 - Coffee and Networking
  • 11:45 - Session 2: Violence and Society
  • Human dignity, fundamental rights and human security set moral and ethical standards by which citizens can develop their potential. Yet these standards continue to be frequently disregarded through painful acts of violation in everyday life with devastating consequences for social participation and growth. This session examines the trends extrapolating from the here and now in order to understand our potential direction as a society.
  • Speakers:
    • Prof Corinne May-Chahal - Safeguarding Cyborg Childhood: Security Lancaster
    • Current concerns in child protection remain largely divided between offline safeguarding from harm and injury and online risks generated through use of computer mediated communication and the Internet. This paper draws on original interdisciplinary research designed to develop software tools for improved child safety to highlight the practical utility for law enforcement, education and social care professionals of adopting an ontology of childhood in a digital world that is neither online nor offline but both. In doing so we acknowledge the potential to empower children to use new technologies to participate in self directed security solutions.
    • Dr Stuart Kirby - Can televised football be associated with domestic violence?: Security Lancaster
    • The English Premier League, televised to over 200 Countries, is one example of the global interest in football. Historically the game is associated with violence surrounding the stadiums, however this particular study examined domestic abuse incidents, reported to the Lancashire Police, during the three preceding televised FIFA world cup tournaments. It found incidents increased throughout each of the competitions and intensified when the games were played on weekends and when the England team exited the competition. Although the study is limited in size, it has significant implications due to the global explosion of televised football.
    • Prof Brian Francis - Estimating Lifetime Prevalence of Intimate Violence - Are the Current Lifetime Estimates Too Low?: Security Lancaster
    • This talk addresses a crucial issue for domestic violence policy. Lifetime prevalence in victimisation studies tends to be estimated through reported answers to survey questions, by asking respondents whether an event such as intimate violence has ever happened in their lives up to that point. For example, in the WHO multi-country study of women's health and domestic violence, the lifetime prevalence of partner violence was defined as "the proportion of ever-partnered women who reported having experienced one or more acts of physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner at any point in their lives" (Garcia-Moreno et al, 2006) This definition ignores any event which might take place in the lives of the respondents. Under this definition, the lifetime prevalence will vary by the age of the respondent , and will not be an estimate of the risk of victimisation over the whole life of the respondent. Taking the example of intimate violence in England and Wales, and using the British Crime Survey, we discuss the issues involved in making an estimate of true lifetime prevalence from survey data including recall, underreporting and missingness. Finally we present initial estimates for the larger, true lifetime prevalence of intimate violence.
    • Mr Martin Orton - In the digital age, why are so many young people confident, but not competent internet users? And what are the implications?: Bold Creative
    • 'Digital judgement' is the ability to engage critically with the content we consume, create and share online - a core skill set for the 21st century. This talk will explore the state of digital judgement among young people in the UK, looking in particular at recent research by Demos and at The Digital Disruption Project's unique response to this issue. It will conclude by proposing the steps that need to be taken to make our vision of a digitally fluent and critical thinking society a reality.
  • 13:00 - Lunch
  • 14:00 - Session 3: Investigative Expertise
  • Investigative expertise is essential to the effective management and investigation of security issues. Under our investigative expertise theme, we develop methods for educing quality information (e.g., via effective interview; influence in cyberspace) and we develop and train investigators in methods that allow effective sense-making of information (e.g., risk assessment tools; skills for detection deception). Our belief is that the human is at the centre of the security 'challenge' and that careful yet determined application of good behavioural science will promote effective information gathering and decision making.
  • Speakers:
    • Dr Adrian West - From the clinic to the incident room: the application of behavioural science to police investigations.
    • This brief talk will address the practical reality of responding to requests to provide advice in major crime enquiries, sometimes in time critical situations. He will discuss his efforts to navigate and work within the academic, practitioner and police investigative domains with case examples.
    • Dr Paul Taylor - Using social signals to enhance security: Security Lancaster
    • Prof Tom Ormerod - Securing the skies through controlled conversations: Security Lancaster
    • Since September 11 2001, the search has intensified for security screening methods that can protect transportation systems while minimising inconvenience to the travelling public: Arguably, many of these efforts have failed. A study is reported of a large-scale field trial to evaluate a new method for screening aviation passengers, which operates by detecting deception in passengers' verbal accounts. Data indicate that the new method is far more effective than its current rival, and that it offers a way of meeting the "four E's" that define a successful method: it is effective, efficient, equal, and (surprisingly) enjoyable.
  • 15:15 - Coffee and Networking
  • 15:30 - Session 4: Security Futures
  • In security futures we attempt to understand the future through a multidisciplinary lens drawing on expertise from across the University campus. This approach enables us to explore the grey areas and the fault line between society, technology and infrastructure in order to understand such things as the future of cities, conflict zones and the concept of boarders. This final session peers into the future to explore the potential and problems of a rapidly changing technological and societal landscape.
  • Speakers:
    • Jonathan Birdwell - Social media and the future of security: Demos
    • Social media represent the largest, richest, and most dynamic evidence base for human behaviour that has ever existed. It offers new opportunities to understand groups, movements and society. However, as it stands, the current field of social media analytics is inadequate for policy makers: standards of evidence and methodological rigour are not high enough to influence decision- or policy-making. Considerations of culture, context, group, language and psychology are rare, and the ethics of social media research even rarer. The new Centre for the Analysis of Social Media (CASM) at the thinktank Demos works to develop social media analysis as a valid instrument of research that meets the needs of policy makers. Jonathan will discuss some of the CASM method, previous Demos research into Facebook supporters of far right groups in Europe, and the key question of how online behaviour relates to offline behaviour.
    • Dr Karolina Follis - Border Futures: Security Lancaster
    • The beginning of the 21st century has been marked by contentious debates on how best to pursue security in a global world. In many places, particularly in the West, international borders were identified as too porous for the age of irregular migration, militant movements, human trafficking and other crimes. Thus, since the beginning of the past decade, a process of rebordering is underway. No longer confined to territorial lines and passport checks, borders have become technologically sophisticated networks designed to guard against multiple threats. Some see these changes as necessary protection and advocate for further investment in border security. Others object, documenting the repressive features and exclusionary power of the West's new borders. This presentation shows, using examples drawn from research, some of the key dilemmas generated by rebordering. It argues that to fully appreciate the political stakes of the debates about borders, we must ask what a rebordered future could look like and whether we are equipped to meet it.
    • Dr Karenza Moore - Futures of Psychoative Drug-Taking: Security Lancaster
    • This talk examines knowledge production regarding present and future trends in illegal and illicit psychoactive drug-taking. Drawing on her research with drug-users and partnerships with a range of stakeholders, Karenza asks how can we 'know' about drug-taking, what is the role of both the sciences and the social sciences in this endeavour, and what might be the intended and unintended consequences of our efforts?
    • Dr Mark Lacy - Thinking about Uncertainty and Speed: Security Lancaster
  • 16:45 - Closing Thoughts by Dr Daniel Prince
  • 17:00 -Event Close