Engineering

The following modules are available to incoming Study Abroad students interested in Engineering.

Alternatively you may return to the complete list of Study Abroad Subject Areas.

ENGR216: Engineering Mechanics

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 216M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 216L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR216: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR 216M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR 216L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR216: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR216M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR216L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

The module will develop students’ understanding of the physical behaviour of structural components and their design with reference to stress and deformations and provide mathematical and physical models for the analysis and design of statically indeterminate structures. The module will equip students with knowledge and understanding of the engineering principles of dynamics and the ability to analyse forces arising in a range of engineering components when undergoing planar motion; both underpin engineering design.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Carry out two-dimensional stress and strain transformation calculations
  • Calculate maximum shear stresses in shafts and beams subject to shear loads
  • Use differential relationships among bending load, shearing load and cross section deflection and rotation for the mechanical analysis of beams and shafts subject to bending and shear loads
  • Calculate the deflections and the rotations of statically indeterminate beams and shafts subject to axial, bending, shear and torsional loads using superposition of standard solutions, integration of the governing differential equations, Mohr’s theorems and compatibility principles
  • Analyse the stability of structures at risk of bucking and design such structures to prevent the occurrence of buckling
  • Use the principles of kinematics to analyse the planar motion of a particle
  • Use  the principles of kinematics to determine and solve the equations of motion of a rigid body in general planar motion
  • Use energy principles to determine dynamic forces in simple rotating machinery
  • Understand the concept of static and dynamic imbalance

Outline Syllabus

  • ENGR 216MStatics: Multi-dimensional stress systems. Multi-dimensional strain systems. Transformation of stresses and strains. Shear stress field in beam cross sections. Deflections, strain and stress in statically indeterminate structures subject to axial, bending, torsional and shear loads. Differential relationships among bending load, shear load. And deflections in loaded beams. Buckling.
  • ENGR 216L  Dynamics: Kinematics of a particle: rectilinear and curvilinear motion; Cartesian, polar and cylindrical coordinate systems; relative motion; constrained motion of connected particles; instantaneous centres; Planar kinetics of a rigid body: equations of motion; general planar motion of a rigid body; Energy methods; Mass moment of inertia and parallel axes theorem; Balance of rotating masses.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Progress test: 20%(Statics: 10%; Dynamics: 10%)

ENGR226: Electrical Circuits and Power Systems

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 226M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 226L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR226: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR226M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR226L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR226: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR226M: 4 credits 
    • ENGR226L: 4 credits
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course aims to provide you with a range of electrical circuit design tools and techniques relevant for the design of practical electrical systems. It will give you an understanding of power system engineering including transmission, distribution and utilisation and the supporting engineering knowledge of operation and control of an electrical power network

  • ENGR 226M Electrical Circuits: This course aims to provide you with a range of electrical circuit design tools and techniques relevant for the design of practical electrical systems. Revision of electrical circuit laws, phasor representation, complex representation, impedance/admittance, waveforms, frequency spectra of ac waveforms, ac circuit calculations. RLC circuits, three-phase current/voltage representation, balanced supply, balanced load, one phase of three-phase system, equivalent single-phase of three-phase system, delta-star transformation, star-delta transformation.
  • ENGR 226L Power Systems: It will give you an understanding of power system engineering including transmission, distribution and utilisation and the supporting engineering knowledge of operation and control of an electrical power network. Power, reactive power, power factor, efficiency, per-unit system, voltage regulation, transmission efficiency, transmission line parameters, power system faults and stability, ac/dc distribution, effects of variable loads, load curves, load/diversity factor, load management/forecasting, electrical safety.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Analyse frequency relationships for reactive circuit elements
  • Discuss the principles of three-phase circuits
  • Identify different parts of electrical power systems and explain their functions
  • Design procedures to locate faults within a power network
  • Discuss the system protection and also electrical safety
  • Operate power systems effectively, with ensuring system security and quality of supply

Outline Syllabus

  • AC Signal and Theory: Revision of electrical circuit laws, Phasor representation, Complex representation,
  • Impedance/Admittance, Instantaneous/peak/mean/average/rms value of a waveform, Frequency spectra of ac waveforms, ac circuit calculations
  • RLC circuits: Series/parallel RLC circuits, Phasor diagrams for RLC circuits, Impedance/admittance of a
  • RLC circuit, RLC resonance, Active/reactive power, Power factor, Power factor correction
  • Three-phase Circuits: Three-phase current/voltage representation, Balanced supply, Balanced load, One phase of three-phase system, Equivalent single-phase of three-phase system, Delta-star transformation,
  • Star-delta transformation
  • Electrical Power Generation Overview: Power, Reactive power, power factor, efficiency, The per-unit system
  • Transmission System: Voltage regulation, Transmission efficiency, Transmission line parameters
  • Power System Faults and Stability: Introduction to symmetrical three-phase fault analysis, stability
  • Distribution and Utilisation: Overhead and underground systems, Ring and radial systems, Distribution substations, ac/dc distribution, Effects of variable loads, Load curves, Load/Diversity factor, Tariffs, Load management/forecasting
  • Electrical Safety: Overcurrent protection, Residual current protection, Avoidance of electrical shock, Earthing, Step and touch potential hazards

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 70%
  • Practical: 20%
  • Test: 10%

ENGR300: Individual BEng Project

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • US Credits: 8 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 16 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally Engineering majors in their final year only.

Course Description

This courses aims to integrate and give practice in the application of areas of engineering science that have been learned in earlier parts of the course and to develop skills in communication at a number of levels, from dealing appropriately with supervisors, support staff and technicians, to the presentation of verbal and written reports. You are required to prepare an individual final report, which forms the major part of the assessment.

Educational Aims

The course aims to:

  • Give the students an in-depth knowledge of a specific, specialist area of their subject
  • Learn either professional software, research, design or experimental skills consistent with subject.

Outline Syllabus

The module involves the students completing an individual project. They are responsible for the research, management and technical content of the project as well as evidencing the use of professional engineering skills where appropriate. The students will be assigned a project title and project supervisor who will guide and advise them throughout the project.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 100%

ENGR311: Engineering Management

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Engineering majors only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to examine the role of management and its relevance to engineers today. In this context, specific knowledge about manufacturing systems and project financial appraisal will be introduced, together with relevant aspects of law and human resource management, industrial organisation and project costing.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the role of management in industry and its relevance to engineers today;
  • understand how modern manufacturing operations are organized financially;
  • evaluate financially both large and small projects as the basis for major decisions;  
  • have a knowledge of what quality is and its importance to all organizations;
  • apply suitable tools for the improvement of quality;  
  • have a knowledge of the relevant aspects of law and human resource management;
  • understand the importance of environmental reporting;
  • carry out a basic level of safety management.

Outline Syllabus

  • An outline of company finance and reporting;
  • relevant aspects of law and human resource management;
  • industrial organisation; project costing;
  • and an overview of environmental reporting, quality and safety management.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Exam: 90%

ENGR312: Electrical and Fluid Drives and Actuators

  • Terms Taught: Lent term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Engineering majors only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the working principles and applications of fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic) and electrical systems for power transmission, drives and actuation and to investigate the benefits and disadvantages of different types of drive system and to develop a rationale for their selection.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:  

  • Specify a drive system based on the load characteristics and functional requirements;
  • Draw a hydraulic power circuit diagram using conventional symbols;
  • Design a simple hydraulic drive system ? for example the arm control on a backhoe digger;
  • Produce a schematic diagram for a dc or asynchronous drive system to meet specified requirements;
  • Describe the principal types of power semiconductor that are used for drive systems and understand their operational limits;
  • Specify the main components for a semiconductor-controlled drive system.

Outline Syllabus

  • Applications of hydraulic and pneumatic drive systems. 
  • Benefits and disadvantages of fluid power systems, in comparison with electric drives.
  • Practical considerations in the selection and specification of drive systems. 
  • Characteristics of fixed and variable displacement pumps, valves, actuators and other principal system elements. 
  • Design of hydraulic power systems for translational actuators (e.g. industrial robot systems) and rotational actuators (hydraulic motors) and use of conventional hydraulic symbols. 
  • Introduction to power semiconductor devices, including naturally-commutated and force-commutated switching devices.
  • Single-phase and three-phase rectifier circuits using either diodes or naturally-commutated controlled rectifiers.
  • Forward and reverse load flow, principles of regeneration. DC to DC converters.  
  • Pulse-width modulation, step-down and step-up converter configurations.
  • PWM switching strategies.
  • Three-phase inverters for asynchronous drive system applications.
  • Limitations on modulation imposed by device characteristics and losses. 
  • Interface between drive system and electrical power supply - harmonic limitations, current fluctuations, NPS currents, etc. 
  • Design of complete drive systems using combination of force-commutated converters, dc links, etc. 
  • Control of drive systems including proportional control closed loop position and speed control systems.  

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Exam: 90%

ENGR332: Integrated Circuit Engineering

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Electronic Systems Engineering and Computer Systems Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to develop your generic design skills in an industrial context and to provide a wider understanding of integrated circuits in a general context (not limited to particular scales or devices). It will also provide an understanding of the design and optimisation of digital CMOS circuits with respect to different quality metrics (cost, speed, power dissipation, reliability) and an understanding of how different digital logic blocks can be realised on silicon (arithmetic and logic blocks, memories). You will also understand system level integration issues (clocked systems, datapath oriented design, chip design options, structured design strategies) and technology scaling and the issues relating to deep submicron design.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • analyse digital CMOS circuits for functionality;
  • analyse simple performance metrics;
  • derive circuits to implement simple functions;
  • use an industrial tool to model, analyse and construct digital circuits

Outline Syllabus

  • CMOS circuit engineering: MOSFET short channel effects; switch model; digital design metrics; design of logic elements.
  • Arithmetic building blocks: data paths; adders; busses; multipliers.
  • Memory elements classification: latches; flip-flops; timing metrics.
  • Memory and array structures: memory classification; memory architectures and building blocks; memory core.
  • Timing issues: timing classifications; synchronous timing  basics; latch-based clocking; clock distribution; timing metrics.
  • Power consumption: metrics; static and dynamic power consumption equations; leakage power; power minimisation techniques.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Coursework: 20%

ENGR333: Analogue Electronics

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Electronic Systems Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce time and frequency domain representations of analogue circuits; and to examine the principles of analogue integrated circuit and filter design, including linear network transfer functions. It will introduce the range of analogue components available and encourage you to develop the design skills required by industry, both in the context of analogue circuits and in the wider engineering discipline.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • analyse circuits in the time and frequency domains;
  • analyse and evaluate fundamental analogue circuit building blocks;
  • describe the composition of active and passive filters.

Outline Syllabus

  • Transistors: MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) models; capacitances; bipolar transistor operation and models.
  • Transistor circuits for Integrated Circuits: current mirrors and IC biasing; two stage amplifiers; Op Amp design; high-frequency analysis; feedback and sensitivity; noise analysis. 
  • Fundamentals of linear continuous time filters: linear network transfer functions; poles and zeros; characterisation of sinusoidal, step and impulse responses; first and second order low pass, high pass and band pass transfer functions; sinusoidal and step responses; design of passive and active circuits for synthesis of transfer functions, parasitics and filter precision.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR335: Optoelectronics and wireless communications

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this module is to look at the fundamental components of optical communication and wireless systems and information theory, including the physical propagation of signals, electromagnetism and signal analysis. The module will introduce the theory of using optoelectronics and radio waves for telecommunications; and will examine the main types of antenna and their properties.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of optical communications;
  • Define the main optical components in a communication system;
  • Explain the fundamentals of wireless systems, transmitters and receivers;
  • Carry out calculations on radio transmission antennas and coding;
  • Explain the use of radio waves for telecommunications;
  • Describe the main types of antenna, their properties and uses;
  • Explain the reasons for the design choices made in a variety of communications systems.

Outline Syllabus

  • Optoelectronics: overview of optical communication systems; optical components; optical sources.
  • Wireless communications: electromagnetic spectrum; elements of radio waves propagation; transmitter; receiver; link budget; types of wireless networks; Antennas: waves in free space; dipole; loop and aperture antennas; antenna arrays; directivity; gain; effective area. 
  • Revision of information theory: channel capacity; Shannon’s Law; noise. 
  • Revision of modulation: AM; FM; PSK etc.  Access: TDM; FDM; CDM. 
  • System case studies: Internet fibre cables backbone, radio and TV broadcasting. 

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR352: Vibration Analysis and Applications

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to develop your skills and abilities in mechanics, particularly in relation to mechanisms and linkages, balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery, and flexible systems which are able to vibrate. It will teach you about some common components of machinery and the engineering science that is necessary to analyse and design them.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • use principles of forces and moments equilibrium (with inertia forces) to estimate the forces acting on rigid bodies that are accelerating in two dimensions;
  • use kinematic principles to relate displacements and velocities (and accelerations in certain special cases, e.g. the slider-crank mechanism of a typical reciprocating engine) of points on linkages of rigid bodies;
  • find the location of instantaneous centres in a linkage (such as swing-arm centres and roll centre of a vehicle suspension), and apply the instantaneous-centre method to investigate the velocities of points on a linkage;
  • find the velocity of any point of selected planar mechanisms using velocity diagrams and the velocity image theorem;
  • find the acceleration of any point of selected planar mechanisms using acceleration diagrams and the acceleration image theorem;
  • apply the idea of energy conservation to ideal systems (work in = work out).

Outline Syllabus

  • Kinematics and kinetics of mechanisms: velocity diagrams; instantaneous centres; simple cases of acceleration.
  • Two-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems: natural frequencies (eigenvalues) and modes of vibration (eigenvectors); matrix methods. 
  • Balancing rotating and reciprocating equipment.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Exam: 90%

ENGR353: Design and Manufacturing

  • Terms Taught:  Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to examine a range of manufacturing processes, including metal cutting, machining and automation; and to consider the role of computers and information systems in the operation of manufacturing equipment. It will develop your insight into the link between design and manufacture and to improve your generic design skills.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the process of machining;
  • understand the principles of work holding and fixturing;  
  • prepare a process plan;  
  • estimate times for manufacture of simple jobs;  
  • understand the principles of CAPPE;
  • set out a time estimate for a manual or robotic assembly process;  
  • understand the principles of DFMA;  
  • give an account of the relationship between CNC, FMS and CIM, including the information structures needed to achieve integration;  
  • have an understanding of key issues in modern manufacturing, especially regarding tooling and other investment 'hot-spots';
  • appreciate current enabling technologies such as rapid prototyping and the use of in-cycle gauging and SPC to promote 'right first time'.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction and review of metal cutting manufacturing processes.
  • Mechanical machining theory. Jigs and fixtures.
  • Cost estimating.
  • CNC and ancillary equipment.
  • FMS and Parts Classification.
  • Group technology.
  • Assembly automation and DFMA.
  • CIM structures.
  • Process choices in relation to product specifications, quantities and tooling options.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR354: Engineering Materials

  • Terms Taught:  Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronic Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to examine in detail the physical behaviour of a wide range of engineering materials, including their toughness, creep, fatigue and corrosion. The course will also consider methods for detecting flaws in structures and materials and judge how different materials impact on the general analysis and design of mechanical engineering components and structures.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:  

  • understand the difference between toughness and fracture toughness of materials and how the latter is applied to determine a materials susceptibility to fast fracture;
  • understand the nature of fatigue, the differences between high and low cycle fatigue, have an appreciation of fatigue testing and how to carry out simple fatigue calculations;
  • understand the nature of creep, have an appreciation of creep testing, appreciate the basis of semi-empirical creep laws and simple creep calculations;
  • appreciate the factors controlling dry and wet corrosion, have an understanding of the relative ranking of the susceptibility of materials to both forms of corrosion;
  • understand dry and wet corrosion models and the differences between them and appreciate the principal approaches to corrosion protection;
  • understand the basic mechanics of friction and wear and understand some of the methods of reducing their deleterious effects;
  • understand the main methods of non-destructive detection of flaws and cracks and to appreciate their advantages and limitations.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to toughness, critical fracture toughness and simple fracture mechanics. 
  • Introduction to fatigue, the fatigue classification system, empirical fatigue laws and simple crack extension – stress cycle calculations.
  • Definition of creep, creep testing, empirical creep laws, stress relaxation and simple creep calculations.
  • Dry corrosion and simple models of the process, wet corrosion, galvanic cells and corrosion protection.
  • The nature of surfaces, static and kinetic friction, adhesive and abrasive wear.
  • Non-destructive methods of crack/flaw detection – their advantages and limitations.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR355: Machine Elements

  • Terms Taught: Mihcaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronic Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of the course is to familiarise you with a range of interesting problems involving elements of machines and with the generic techniques for analysing them. You will develop your skills in analysing some commonly-occurring machine elements, particularly gears and rolling elements, screw threads and plain bearings.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:  

  • establish the geometry of contacts between bodies, including relative radii of curvature;
  • estimate stresses and loads between bodies at such contacts;
  • carry out calculations on involute gear geometry, including estimating load capacity;
  • estimate load capacity of plain (hydrodynamic) bearings;
  • describe how loads are carried by bolted joints.

Outline Syllabus

  • Contact stresses: relative radii of curvature of two bodies at their point of contact; estimation of load, given allowable stress, and of stress, given load. 
  • Examples of ball and roller bearings, railway wheels etc. 
  • Involute gears: geometry of gear teeth for constant velocity ratio; the involute tooth form and its geometry; contact stresses between gear teeth. 
  • Screw threads: transmission of forces in bolted joints e.g. of forces on a cylinder head, thread forms, tightening torque and the influence of friction.
  • Methods of applying pretension. 
  • Other types of fasteners.
  • Tribology: friction and lubrication, hydrodynamic lubrication, rectangular plane pad, journal bearings.
  • Reynolds' equation in one dimension, tilting-pad bearings and hydrostatic bearings.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR361: Nuclear Medicine

  • Terms Taught:  Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the nuclear engineering systems used in medical applications throughout the world. It will introduce you to the concept of radiobiological effects. You will review three main aspects of nuclear medicine: external beam radiotherapy, internal radiotherapy and radiology. On successful completion of this course, you will be able to understand the essential role that nuclear techniques fulfil in medicine and have an appreciation of where current research trends are taking the field.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the difference between radiotherapy and radiology
  • identify an appropriate method for the treatment of a given medical condition i.e. the association of proton therapy viz. cancer of the cornea; iodine treatment for the thyroid cancer
  • explain the principal parts of key nuclear medical systems such as LINACs, source deployment facilities, PET scanners etc.
  • identify specific isotopes and explain how their properties relate to their common uses such as Tc99m for use in PET etc.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to the effect of radiation on human tissue.
  • External beam radiotherapy: history, methods, devices and techniques.
  • Internal radiotherapeutic methods: sources and techniques.
  • Radiology and related imaging methods.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%

ENGR362: Nuclear Instrumentation

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of instrumentation that is specific to nuclear applications. It will provide you with knowledge of the common nuclear instrumentation systems that might encounter in industry, medicine and research and provide an indication of where current research is taking this area forward.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will:

  • be aware of the principal radiation detection modalities in use throughout the world;
  • understand and be able to set up some of these systems;
  • understand the statistical issues associated with the use of these instrumentation systems and the interpretation of their data;
  • be aware of the compromise between energy resolution and detection efficiency;
  • be aware of the safety issues associated with the use of nuclear instrumentation.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to nuclear instrumentation applications;
  • review of radiation detection modalities;
  • data analysis and interpretation;
  • the detection and measurement of energy, count level, energy spectra and dose;
  • safety issues associated with nuclear instrumentation.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%

ENGR371: Energy Conversion

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the physics, chemistry and engineering of common energy conversion processes; conventional thermal power generation (coal, oil, open-cycle and combined cycle gas turbines); and the ability to analyse system efficiency and CO2 emissions of different schemes. You will also study direct conversion including solar photovoltaic devices and fuel cells.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss and deduce numerically, the efficiency of a variety of energy conversion processes.

Outline Syllabus

  • Chemical conversion in combustion,
  • photovoltaics,
  • nuclear fission and fusion,
  • ethanol distillation,
  • steam power plants,
  • fuel cells.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%