Engineering

The following modules are available to incoming Study Abroad students interested in Engineering.

Alternatively you may return to the complete list of Study Abroad Subject Areas.

ENGR111: Mechanics of Materials

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

The human skeleton, a suspension bridge and a car chassis are all examples of structures that are designed to transmit forces from one place to another. To do this safely and efficiently it is important to adopt the right shape and to use materials with appropriate strength and stiffness properties. This course covers the selection and use of materials to design a wide range of practical structures. The emphasis is on gaining a physical understanding to the way structures work.

Educational Aims

By the end of this course, students should:

  • Be able to appreciate a range of materials and structural forms for the achievement of both strength and stiffness for a wide range of manufactured products
  • Be aware of some causes of structural failures
  • Be able to generate simple structural models of real structural problems
  • Be able to design and analyse simple statically determinate structural elements and develop some physical "feel" for structural behaviour
  • Carry out some sheet metal fabrication and test operations

Outline Syllabus

  • Revision of basic statistics - forces, moments, resultants, resolving etc.
  • Elastic and plastic stress.
  • Design of components in tension.
  • Euler buckling theory and design of components in compression.
  • Bending moments and shear forces.
  • Bending stress theory.
  • Calculation of section moduli values.
  • Design of components in bending.
  • Combined bending and axial forces.
  • Simple design of welded and bolted connections.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR112: Manufacturing Fundamentals

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

Manufacture is at the foundation of our global prosperity, whether it be production of raw materials such as steel or polymers, of consumer durables like cars and washing machines, or of foods such as biscuits or baked beans. This course will introduce some of the materials used in engineering, including common metals, polymers and polymer composites and it will consider the reasons why certain familiar artefacts are made the way they are.

Educational Aims

By then end of this course, students should:

  • be able to recognise and distinguish a range of common engineering materials, and be aware of their principal properties
  • be able to describe some common manufacturing processes, in electronic and mechanical engineering (and possibly other fields), and to recognise the processes that have been used in creating a range of simple artefacts
  • be aware of the influence of batch quantity on unit cost, and consequently on the choice of manufacturing process
  • be aware of the history of a small selection of manufacturing processes ( eg smelting iron ore, Abraham Darby and sons, Ironbridge etc)
  • as part of the module, gain hands-on experience of some simple manufacturing processes and of simple physical testing procedures

Outline Syllabus

  • metal castings, effect of temperature on structure of metals, equilibrium phase diagrams, moulding techniques
  • polymers, types of polymers, behaviour of polymers under stress, production techniques using polymers
  • forming metals, sheet-metal forming, deep-drawing, work-hardening and why it happens. Heat treatment of metals to alter their properties.
  • cutting metals on e.g. lathe, drilling machine etc, tool life and costs.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR113: Electrical and Electronics Fundamentals

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

The module introduces the fundamental physical quantities in the field of electrical and electronic engineering, together with the main laws and theorems necessary to understand direct and alternating current flow in a circuit, including Kirchoff’s Laws, simplification theorems, electromagnetic effects, etc. Frequency-dependent linear components and circuits are also introduced and their use in signal filtering is discussed in detail.

Laboratory classes involve the design and construction of simple circuits and the study of frequency-dependent circuits, to reinforce aspects of the course presented in the lectures.

Educational Aims

The module aims to help students to:

  • Integrate theory and practice.

  • Acquire problem solving skills applicable in most areas of computing, engineering and ICT (signals, impedance, analogue signal processing).

  • Communicate their conclusions to both expert and non-expert audiences.

  • Autonomously plan and implement tasks.

Outline Syllabus

The module introduces students to the basic concepts of Electrical & Electronic Engineering thus forming a foundation for the 3 or 4 years of study to follow. The module will introduce basic electrical quantities and units, ohms law, resistive dividers, Norton & Thevenin’s theorem, current & voltage sources, nodal analysis, superposition, Kirchoff’s current and voltage laws, maximum power theorem, reciprocity theorem, mesh analysis with multiple sources, inductors, capacitors, RL, RC and RLC circuits, impedance and admittance. The lectures will be backed up with laboratories that will explore the fundamentals associated with the lecture material.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR114: Fundamentals of Electronic Instrumentation

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

Sensing and extracting signals from the real world is a fundamental requirement of virtually all electronic systems. In origin, all data is either sensed or typed. This course will give you the background knowledge and understanding to use some basic sensors and design amplifiers and related ‘front-end’ circuits. It includes work on circuits and networks and introduces the op-amp, which is a fundamental building block of many analogue circuits. You will also gain an understanding of signals and signal engineering in both time and frequency. Apart from those studying technology or engineering, this course is relevant to those interested in technology and either intending to use electronic devices hands-on or to pursue a professional career in a technology-related company.

Educational Aims

On successfully completing this course, students will understand the ways in which signals are captured from sensors, then amplified and conditions such that they can be fed into a data acquisition system. They will have a basic understanding of analogue circuits and will be able to analyse and design a variety of common amplifiers. The students will also gain an understanding of signals and how they can be represented in time and frequency and manipulated with filters.

Outline Syllabus

  • Sensing elements.
  • Generalised sensor systems, example applications and motivations.
  • Basic sensor characteristics and non-ideal behaviour.
  • Potentiometers for linear and angular displacement measurement. Non linearity due to loading effects.
  • Strain gauge element examples.
  • Strain gauge measurements using bridge configurations.
  • Motion and velocity sensing using optical and magnetic encoders.
  • Other sensing examples.
  • Basic signal conditioning.
  • Generic amplifiers and non-ideal behaviour.
  • Operational voltage amplifiers - basic circuit configurations.
  • Operational voltage amplifiers limitations.
  • Differential amplifiers.
  • Signal and waveform basics.
  • Signal and waveform basics for altering waveforms.
  • Viewing signals in the time and frequency domain.
  • Reactive circuit elements for filtering operations.
  • Review of course and progress test.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR115: Computers and Control

  • Terms Taught: Summer Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

Control is about making engineering devices work efficiently and safely. This course gives you the ability to programme to a level where they are able to solve everyday engineering problems, such as controlling the movement of a robot arm. It includes work on the fundamentals of structuring and writing a computer program, as well as experience at interfacing with practical engineering systems such as a motor. The course will be particularly relevant to you with an interest in robotics, computing and control.

Educational Aims

On completing this module, students should be able to plan and implement the development of a practically-useful computer program. They will have the ability to use functions, arrays and pointers, and will be able to manipulate strings, format the input/output and carry out basic mathematical calculations. They will be able to use these skills to control an engineering system such as a robot arm, by interfacing their program with appropriate data logging cards and control actuators.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to feedback.
  • Open-loop and closed-loop.
  • Control terminology and objectives.
  • Mathematical models.
  • Model for vehicle speed.
  • 1st Order systems.
  • Introduction to Transfer Functions.
  • Block diagram analysis.
  • Integral action.
  • Proportional + Integral control.
  • Control of a DC motor.
  • Control of ventilation rate.
  • Ramp metering control on motorways.
  • Control of robot joint angle.
  • Introduction to advanced control methods.
  • Introduction to LabView.
  • Introduction to Matlab/Simulink.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 100%

ENGR116: Fundamentals of Digital Electronics

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

A key feature of most of today’s cutting-edge electronic technology is the storage and processing of information. This course uncovers the engineering principles behind these critical requirements; it provides you with both the knowledge and the vocabulary with which to understand digital electronic systems together with the background necessary to appreciate what is likely to be possible in the future. Apart from electronic engineers, this course is relevant to those students aspiring to managerial positions in technology-driven industries who need to understand the foundations on which these industries rely.

Educational Aims

At the end of this module students will understand the basis on which modern electronic technologies function. They will understand how analogue electronic components can be combined to perform simple logic functions; they will appreciate how these logic blocks can be combined to perform memory tasks; they will develop this concept towards the principle of a processor and will learn about simple programmable devices and how these relate to the range of programmable solutions that are currently available.

Outline Syllabus

Basic concepts of digital electronics such as:

  • Boolean algebra,
  • truth tables,
  • Karnaugh Maps,
  • positive and negative logic,
  • logic gates,
  • memory circuits,
  • counting circuits,
  • registers,
  • adders,
  • Finite State machine,
  • PLDs,
  • Von Neumann architecture,
  • basics of programming languages,
  • subtraction, multiplication, division and further developments in the field of digital domain.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR117: Introduction to Engineering Thermodynamics

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics and science.

Course Description

Transport is a vital factor in the UK economy and the second-largest consumer of energy in the UK, but one that is difficult to transfer to sustainable resources. This course will cover some of the engineering aspects of the growing use of transport for both goods and people, together with wider implications including safety considerations and the environmental impact of transport. The engineering aspects covered will include brief consideration of fuel consumption and how it may be reduced, types of engines and motors, and electric drive systems for land transport.

Educational Aims

At the end of the course students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the concept of aerodynamic drag and calculate vehicle resistance (for cars, cycles and trains) from the drag coefficient
  • Calculate vehicle performance, taking account of drag, mass and propulsion characteristics
  • Work out energy consumption in kWh or litres of fuel
  • Draw energy flow diagrams for IC engine, electric and hybrid vehicles
  • Describe the thermodynamic cycles for petrol and diesel engines and the major components of these engines
  • Understand the characteristics of dc motors and the relationships between back EMF, field current and speed

Outline Syllabus

  • Energy use in the UK,
  • sources of fuel,
  • concept of efficiency,
  • Otto and diesel cycles,
  • aerodynamic drag,
  • basic circuit theory,
  • DC motors,
  • batteries and fuel cells.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR118: Heat Transfer

  • Terms Taught: Summer Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics.

Course Description

The course covers all aspects of energy from the first law of thermodynamics to the ways in which energy is captured from renewable sources. You will learn about the full process of electricity generation from the starting energy resource, whether it is wind, fossil fuel or uranium. You will be able to work out energy balances for nuclear and chemical reactions and understand the concept of mechanical, chemical, nuclear and electrical potential. You will appreciate the limits of thermodynamic efficiency of power conversion systems and will also have an overview of energy transmission systems, including the ‘hydrogen economy’. You will gain a detailed understanding of wind turbine design as well as learning the principles behind computing reaction rates.

Educational Aims

On completing this course, students will:

  • understand the ways in which energy is captured from renewable sources and produced from fossil fuel reserves.
  • have a basic understanding of how hydroelectric schemes, tidal barrages, wave energy and wind turbines work and will be able to make numerate comparisons of the energy available from these sources with thermal and nuclear power stations.
  • have appreciated the limits of thermodynamic efficiency of power conversion systems and will also have been given an overview of energy transmission systems, including the "hydrogen economy".
  • have a detailed understanding of wind turbine design.

As a preparation for students going on to study chemical or nuclear engineering they will have learnt the principles behind computing reaction rates.

Outline Syllabus

  • Fluid mechanics and basic aerodynamics.
  • Design of modern horizontal axis wind turbines.
  • Energy, power, energy methods, the first law of thermodynamics.
  • Energy use, sustainability and evaluation of environmental impact.
  • Solar radiation and global warming.
  • Electrical power generation and distribution.
  • Introduction to the second law of thermodynamics.
  • Outline of heat engines and power station steam cycles.
  • Chemical and Nuclear reactions, mass balance.
  • Basics of nuclear power generation and its environmental status.
  • Chemistry and utilisation of Fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas).
  • Chemical kinetics, activation energy and the Arrhenius equation.
  • Chemical equilibrium and chemical potential

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR119: Design, Innovation and 3-D Thinking

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level mathematics.

Course Description

The world is increasingly looking for aspiring young people with fresh and invigorating ideas that push beyond traditional values and current practice. This course sets out to enable you, through exploration and discovery, to perceive and evaluate the relationships between several design disciplines. Just as in the real world you will be faced with problems to solve, often in teams, where we will encourage you to innovate to find a solution. This course will equip you with the necessary tools and communication skills to effectively further your career whatever discipline you choose.

Educational Aims

On completing this course, students will:

  • understand the full product lifecycle from customer requirement through the design process to final product recycle/disposal.
  • be able to systematically analyse a problem, and be able to use tools and techniques to assist in generating ideas, enhancing their existing problem solving skills.
  • have an understanding of working in teams and be able to effectively communicate within a scientific discipline.
  • have a basic knowledge of 3D drawing design packages and be able to prepare simple part, assembly and drawing representations.

Outline Syllabus

  • The design process, 2D and 3D CAD, Parts, Assemblies, Drawings.
  • Study techniques, memory and the human brain, thinking and imagination.
  • Marketing, market mix, product lifecycle, branding, packaging.
  • Statement of requirements, requirements capture and specification.
  • Concept design, invention and creativity, concept generation, concept evaluation.
  • Detailed design, bearings, tolerances, DFMA, FMECA, FTA.
  • Form vs Function, influence perception, enhanced usability.
  • TRIZ, TRIZ method, contradictions, principles of invention.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 100%

ENGR160: Process Engineering Fundamentals

  • Terms Taught: This module runs in Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: College level Mathematics.

Course Description

The course aims to cover the fundamental aspects of process engineering. It will provide understanding of basic processing terminology such as batch, semi-batch, continuous, purge, and recycle. Students will be able to implement material balance, energy balance and phase equilibrium calculations of standard processes at steady-state operations.

Educational Aims

On completing this course, students will:

  • Understand fundamentals of chemical process design and standard operations
  • Draw and fully label a flowchart for a given process description
  • Identify possible non-reactive and reactive sub-systems for which material and energy balances might be written
  • Perform basic phase equilibrium calculations
  • Develop basic skills in chemical process engineering
  • Understand how their designs and process selections comply with economic constraints and current health, safety and environmental regulations.
  • Enhance problem solving design and analysis skills
  • Communicate their conclusions to any engineering and non-engineering audiences

Outline Syllabus

  • Review of processes, flow diagrams, process variables and units: density, mole, composition of mixture, pressure, temperature, flow.
  • Mass balance of non-reactive system: General material balance procedure, material balance of a single-unit operation and multiple-unit operations.
  • Material balance of reactive system: Stoichiometry, excess and limiting reactants, conversion, yield and selectivity.
  • Material balance calculations
  • Energy balance of non-reactive systems: changes in enthalpy or internal energy for various process paths: changes in pressure at constant temperature, changes in temperature at constant pressure, changes in temperature at constant volume, changes in phase at constant temperature and pressure (e.g., heat of vaporization), mixing at constant temperature and pressure (heat of mixing).
  • Energy balance: heat capacity, latent heat of vaporization, fusion (melting), sublimation
  • Energy balance for reactive systems
  • Phase equilibrium and chemical process principles: The phase rule, one component systems: ideal and real gas mixtures (estate equations), vapour pressure-temperature relationships (Antoine equation), mixtures: ideal gas mixtures, Dalton law)
  • Vapour-liquid equilibria: the level rule, ideal solutions, Raoult's Law, Henry's Law, volatility and relative volatility, constant pressure diagrams, non-ideal solutions, steam distillation, binary solutions containing non-volatile solutes.
  • Vapour-gas equilibria: saturated vapour-gas mixtures, partial saturation, dew point, vaporisation processes, condensation processes.
  • Equilibrium of binary liquid mixtures: binodal curves, increasing and decreasing mutual solubility, closed solubility curves, effects of impurities and pressure on critical solubility curves, equilibrium of ternary mixtures and equilateral triangular co-ordinates.
  • Implementation of mass balance, energy balance and phase equilibria to multistep operations

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Coursework: 40%

ENGR161: Fundamentals of Chemistry for Engineers

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only
  • US Credits: 2 US credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS

Course Description

This module aims to:

Provide an introduction to key aspects of chemistry relevant to engineers, including atomic & molecular structure, chemical reactions and bonding, thermodynamics, acid/base and redox reactions, reaction kinetics and nuclear chemistry.

Help students develop some practical lab skills in chemistry.

Educational Aims

On completion of this module students should have acquired a basic understanding of core chemistry topics of relevance to the engineering disciplines and should be able to:

Describe the basic make up of atoms and molecules

Discuss the importance of electrons in a variety of chemical reactions (corrosion, polymerisation, etc.)

Balance chemical equations and predict the results of key reactions

Demonstrate the importance of chemical reactions in various fields of engineering (corrosion, nuclear chemistry, batteries, etc.)

Perform simple calculations relating to the determination of reaction rates

Describe the basic chemistry behind power generation

Outline Syllabus

Atoms, molecules, and ions,

Chemical equations and Molar quantities,

Stoichiometry, Conversion, Selectivity, Yield and Excess

Atomic structure and electronic configuration,

Chemical bonding and bond polarity,

Molecules and materials,

Thermodynamics of chemical reactions

Chemical equilibrium,

Acids, bases and pH

Redox processes

Rates of chemical reactions

Nuclear chemistry

The lectures are supported by weekly small group tutorials. Laboratory classes will be run alongside the lectures to illustrate the practical applications of the concepts learned in the lectures.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Coursework: 40%

ENGR201: Engineering Analysis

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 201M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 201L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR201: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR201M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR201L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR201: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR201M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR201L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites:
    • ENGR201: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.
    • ENGR201M: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.
    • ENGR201L: requires ENGR201M or equivalent

Course Description

This course will introduce students to numerate aspects of engineering. It will provide students with a broad and flexible array of mathematical methods for the analysis of data and signals; and will illustrate the essential role of computing in the application of these. Specifically:

  • ENGR 201M Engineering Analysis: This section of the module covers the numerate landscape, matrices – matrix representation of multivariable coefficients and their manipulation; Functions – periodic, co-ordinate systems, multivariable functions: plotting & sketching; Linear approximations and Newton’s method, Calculus – Rectangle, Trapezium, Simpson’s rule; double integration.
  • ENGR 201L Engineering Analysis: This section of the module is a continuation of ENGR201M and adds Calculus - differential equations; Fourier and Laplace transformations, analysis in time and frequency domain; Vector Calculus; Least squares analysis, uncertainty analysis, statistics; Use of Excel Solver.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • use calculus for the analysis of trigonometric, non-linear, polynomial and exponential functions;
  • sketch multivariable functions with engineering meaning on three-dimensional Cartesian axes;
  • evaluate the significance of differential equations in the description of an Engineering system and apply methods such as Laplace, integration and substitution for their solution;
  • analyse systems in both the time and frequency domain, using Fourier and Laplace transformations;
  • apply the spectrum of approximate methods that exist for finding the roots of equations, definite integrals and linear approximations;
  • use the matrix representation of coefficients and the correspondence to arrays in software, including the use of manipulations such as the inverse matrix;
  • apply the concepts of least squares analysis to assess the consistency of data;
  • be able to use a software package such as Excel for multivariable analysis of a given function and to produce appropriate graphical outcomes.

Outline Syllabus

  • The numerate landscape.
  • Vector calculus.
  • Curve sketching.
  • Coordinate transformations.
  • Differential equations and their solution.
  • Rectangular, Trapezium and Simpson's rules for integral approximation.
  • Analysis in the time and frequency domain.
  • Fourier and Laplace Transformations.
  • Matrix representation of multivariable coefficients and their manipulation.
  • Least squares analysis.
  • Uncertainty analysis.
  • Plotting multivariable functions.
  • Linear approximations and Newton’s method.
  • Use of Excel Solver.
  • Statistical consistency.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Test: 20%

ENGR202: Instrumentation and Control

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 202M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 202L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR202: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR 202M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR 202L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR202 :8 ECTS
    • ENGR 202M: 4 credits 
    • ENGR 202L: 4 credits
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.  

Course Description

  • ENGR 202M Control: This section of the course covers the dynamic response of systems and control system design, modelling first and second order systems, time and frequency response, transfer functions and block diagrams, poles, zeros and stability, feedback control and Bode diagrams.

  • ENGR 202L Instrumentation: This section of the course gives an overview of instrumentation and signal conditioning, resistance-based sensors and physical operating principles, thermo-electric sensors, analogue to digital conversion, magnetic and electromagnetic measurement, high impedance sensors such as piezoelectric and capacitance transducers, acoustic sensors. The course also covers embedded systems, internal parallel and serial busses and interfacing of mapped hardware devices, interrupt architectures, mechanisms and software, concurrent systems – real time scheduling, synchronisation and inter-task communication, data communication including practical implementations of hardware, software and protocols, software and hardware engineering, including a brief introduction to the development cycle.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • develop single-degree-of-freedom models for simple mechanical, electric and electromechanical systems;
  • discuss the assumptions necessary to develop such linear models and have an awareness of nonlinear and chaotic systems;
  • analyse 1st and 2nd order models in both the time and frequency domain, including vibrations and asymptotic stability;
  • write down the transfer function of a system from its differential equation and understand the significance of the poles/zeros;
  • manipulate block diagrams of open and closed-loop systems, and design proportional, integral, derivative, velocity and multi-term controllers; construct and use Bode diagrams;
  • analyse the function and physical operation of a range of common types of transducer, e.g. for the measurement of strain, force, temperature and acceleration;
  • condition signals from such transducers and apply techniques for noise and error reduction;
  • interface devices such as memory, digital IO and analogue IO to a microprocessor or microcontroller;
  • access such devices from within a program using C and/or Assembler and write simple device drivers;
  • design data communication systems for use with an embedded system.

Outline Syllabus

The syllabus is based on three complementary subject areas. The first term considers the dynamic response of systems, whilst the second term focuses on instrumentation and embedded systems. Details are listed below:

Dynamic response of systems and control system design:

  • Modelling 1st and 2nd order systems
  • Time and frequency response
  • Transfer functions and block diagrams
  • Poles, zeros and stability
  • Feedback control and Bode diagrams

Instrumentation:

  • Overview of instrumentation and signal conditioning
  • Resistance based sensors and physical operating principles
  • Thermo-electric sensors
  • Analogue to digital conversion
  • Magnetic and electromagnetic measurement
  • High impedance sensors such as piezoelectric and capacitance transducers.
  • Acoustic sensors

Embedded systems:

  • Internal parallel and serial busses and interfacing of mapped hardware devices
  • Interrupt architectures, mechanisms and software
  • Concurrent systems: real time scheduling, synchronisation and inter-task communication
  • Data communication including practical implementations of hardware, software and protocols
  • Software and hardware engineering, including a brief introduction to the development cycle
  • Von Neumann Architecture, Harvard Architecture, Instruction Set Architecture (ISA), Memory Hierarchy, Cache Memory and CPU Performance
  • Types of Programming Language, Overview of C, Principles of Instruction Sets, The Hardware Stack, Structured Programming, Linked Lists, Stacks and Queues in Software, Graphs, Trees and Tree Traversal Algorithms, Computational Complexity

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Exam: 80%
  • Practical: 10%

ENGR203: Power Engineering

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 203M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 203L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR203: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR203M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR203L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR203: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR 203M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR 203L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course will develop knowledge of heat transfer calculations and to show where these are the essence of, or are essential to, engineering design. It will help students develop an understanding of electric power systems, including the characteristics of the main types of electric machine, together with the principles of their control by transistor and thyristor circuits.

  • ENGR 203M Power Engineering: The course looks at Power Engineering: revision of D.C. and A.C. electric circuit theory, power in reactive circuits and power factor correction, resistors, capacitors and inductors as circuit components, Faraday's Law of Electromagnetic Induction. Transformers: equivalent circuit, losses, testing and efficiency. DC machines: motors and generators, torque and emf equations, shunt and series connections, torque/speed characteristics and methods of control of torque/speed. AC machines: synchronous motors and generators, induction motors torque/speed characteristics and starting methods.
  • ENGR 203L Heat Transfer: This course covers heat transfer, thermal properties, thermal resistance and 1-D conduction through composite walls, heat transfer coefficients for fluid solid interfaces, use of Nusselt, Grashof, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers to determine heat transfer coefficients, heat exchangers, cooling fins, radiative heat loss and transfer between plane surfaces, the 3-D time dependent heat conduction equation and its numerical solution, including the gradient and divergence operators.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • estimate steady state heat transfer rates;
  • size simple parallel and contra flow heat exchangers;
  • estimate temperature distributions within 1-D or rotationally symmetric systems in which there is steady heat flow;
  • correctly size cooling fins;
  • set up appropriate boundary conditions for 3-D heat conduction problems that are to be solved numerically using a software package;
  • estimate the time it takes for a thermal system to reach steady state;
  • discuss the operation of a transformer and the various uses to which transformers can be put;
  • perform calculations to predict the steady state performance of a range of D.C. machines;
  • discuss the operating principles of power semiconductor devices;
  • discuss how power semiconductors can be used to control a range of electrical energy converters;
  • discuss the operation of a stepper motor and how it is controlled;
  • perform calculations to predict the performance of a single phase induction motor;
  • analyse the starting, speed and torque control methods used on induction motors.

Outline Syllabus

The first term focuses on heat transfer whilst the second term moves onto power engineering. Details are listed below. :

Heat Transfer.

  • Thermal properties.
  • Thermal resistance and 1-D conduction through composite walls.
  • Heat transfer coefficients for fluid solid interfaces.
  • Use of Nusselt, Grashof, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers to determine heat transfer coefficients.
  • Heat exchangers.
  • Cooling fins.
  • Radiative heat loss and transfer between plane surfaces.
  • The 3-D time dependent heat conduction equation and its numerical solution, including the gradient and divergence operators.

Power Engineering.

  • Revision of D.C. and A.C. electric circuit theory.
  • Power in reactive circuits and power factor correction.
  • Resistors, capacitors and inductors as circuit components.
  • Faraday's Law of Electromagnetic Induction.
  • Transformers: equivalent circuit, losses, testing and efficiency.
  • DC machines: motors and generators, torque and emf equations, shunt and series connections, torque/speed characteristics and methods of control of torque/speed.
  • AC machines: synchronous motors and generators, induction motors torque/speed characteristics and starting methods.
  • Stepping motor operation, construction and control.
  • Characteristic curves of diodes, bipolar and MOS power transistors and thyristors.
  • Single phase converters and inverters.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 70%
  • Practical: 10%
  • Test: 20%

ENGR204: Engineering Projects

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course looks at the specification and management of projects, the commercial arrangements for the management of projects in industry and business and the hierarchy of specifications and distinction between a functional specification and a technical specification. The role of project manager, types of project organisation, management of time and resources, such as Gantt charts are also considered. The course also considers the preparation of technical specifications for systems and subsystems, the use of functional block diagrams and other means of defining system performance and project risk, the management of health, safety and environmental impact in projects and relevance of industrial project management tools to the management of student projects.

During the course you will work in a project team to design, build and test a complex electromechanical system, such as a line-following autonomous robot, including the conceptual design of this project, development and presentation of project plan and introduction to CAD/CAM.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Describe a mechanical / electrical system at the "block diagram" level, identifying its power and signal flows and writing an overall performance or functional specification;
  • Integrate the functional requirements with other needs, such as maintainability, safety, manufacturability, environmental impact and regulatory compliance;
  • Discuss the requirements for interface management including spatial, mass, environment, control, failure modes, energy;
  • Prepare an interface management plan for a complete project and interface specifications for the subsystems/components;
  • Discuss the project lifecycle including specification, design, manufacture, commissioning, maintenance, modification and disposal;
  • Apply the principles of validating the design of a complex system using analysis, sample testing, type testing, commissioning, system tests and acceptance;
  • Plan projects using Gantt charts and similar techniques;
  • Use the basics of CAD/CAM and simple micro controller software;
  • Develop signal conditioning circuitry from concept to printed circuit board;
  • Develop control software understanding the need for hardware and software calibration.
  • Write a technical report which details the work undertaken within the confines of a group project.
  • Design of a bespoke and inventive solution in order to solve an engineering problem.

Outline Syllabus

This module contains academic learning and group exercises in the first term with a major design/build project in the second term. Details are listed below.

Specification and management of projects. Commercial arrangements for the management of projects in industry and business. Hierarchy of specifications and distinction between a functional specification and a technical specification. The role of project manager, types of project organisation, management of time and resources, such as Gantt charts. Preparation of technical specifications for systems and subsystems. Use of functional block diagrams and other means of defining system performance. Control of project risk. The use of gate reviews to force a periodic critical review. The use of validation and verification processes during project design and implementation. Management of interfaces, including human-machine interface (HMI) and interface with the environment and power supply authorities. Management of health, safety and environmental impact in projects. Relevance of industrial project management tools to the management of student projects.

Laboratory-based electro mechanical team project to design, build and test a complex electromechanical system, such as a line-following autonomous robot. Conceptual design of this project. Development and presentation of project plan. Introduction to CAD/CAM. Practical use of sensors in the development of engineering systems. Design and manufacture of mechanisms and structures. Design of signal conditioning systems. Operator interface design. Evaluation of the project outcome against plan. Product presentation.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 25%
  • Practical: 75%

ENGR205: Business Development Project

  • Terms Taught: Summer Term Only
  • US Credits:   4 US credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

Assessment is on a group basis and consists of a brief, interactive, presentation of a new business proposal (product, process or service offering) developed by the team during the module and by submission of a report containing a succinct and convincing plan for the business.The rationale for the assessment by presentation is to test the ability of the students to work as a team in compiling and delivering an oral presentation of a business concept in a clear and convincing manner. This requires both understanding and skill and is a task that they will encounter in their future careers as professional engineers.A written plan will test their knowledge and skills in producing a report which addresses the key issues surrounding a new venture in a concise format, which may be required both in established businesses or in the case of a completely new venture.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • ? To introduce students to a wide range of transferable skills in the context of entrepreneurship and innovation. To develop students ability to think and argue critically, and plan and organise their work whilst being cognisant of team dynamics and operations.
  • ? To expose students to a rich mixture of experiential learning opportunities that develop a wide range of transferable skills in the context of engineering entrepreneurship and innovation, with a particular focus on the development and use of business plans and marketing strategies.

Outline Syllabus

The module considers a wide range of material in the wider business development arena, encouraging students to think with creativity, with entrepreneurial flair and innovation.

Specifically, this will include: Idea Generation and Evaluation. Student Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Business Start-Up. Employability and Innovation for Engineers. Venture Planning. Business Model Generation. Creating an Innovation Culture. Communication of Business Proposals/Propositions. Market Segmentation. The Marketing Process. Supplemental material covers Internships and Work Experience, Presentation Skills and CV Writing.

Practical sessions allow students to demonstrate their progress on a weekly basis through idea generation, poster presentations, elevator pitches and formal presentations (individually and/or group).

The module is complemented by a number of external industrial speakers who have been successful in their own business endeavours and are keen to pass on that knowledge.

Assessment Proportions

Coursework: 100%

ENGR216: Engineering Mechanics

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 216M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 216L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR216: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR 216M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR 216L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR216: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR216M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR216L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

The module will develop students’ understanding of the physical behaviour of structural components and their design with reference to stress and deformations and provide mathematical and physical models for the analysis and design of statically indeterminate structures. The module will equip students with knowledge and understanding of the engineering principles of dynamics and the ability to analyse forces arising in a range of engineering components when undergoing planar motion; both underpin engineering design.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Carry out two-dimensional stress and strain transformation calculations
  • Calculate maximum shear stresses in shafts and beams subject to shear loads
  • Use differential relationships among bending load, shearing load and cross section deflection and rotation for the mechanical analysis of beams and shafts subject to bending and shear loads
  • Calculate the deflections and the rotations of statically indeterminate beams and shafts subject to axial, bending, shear and torsional loads using superposition of standard solutions, integration of the governing differential equations, Mohr’s theorems and compatibility principles
  • Analyse the stability of structures at risk of bucking and design such structures to prevent the occurrence of buckling
  • Use the principles of kinematics to analyse the planar motion of a particle
  • Use the principles of kinematics to determine and solve the equations of motion of a rigid body in general planar motion
  • Use energy principles to determine dynamic forces in simple rotating machinery
  • Understand the concept of static and dynamic imbalance

Outline Syllabus

  • ENGR 216MStatics: Multi-dimensional stress systems. Multi-dimensional strain systems. Transformation of stresses and strains. Shear stress field in beam cross sections. Deflections, strain and stress in statically indeterminate structures subject to axial, bending, torsional and shear loads. Differential relationships among bending load, shear load. And deflections in loaded beams. Buckling.
  • ENGR 216L Dynamics: Kinematics of a particle: rectilinear and curvilinear motion; Cartesian, polar and cylindrical coordinate systems; relative motion; constrained motion of connected particles; instantaneous centres; Planar kinetics of a rigid body: equations of motion; general planar motion of a rigid body; Energy methods; Mass moment of inertia and parallel axes theorem; Balance of rotating masses.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Progress test: 20%(Statics: 10%; Dynamics: 10%)

ENGR217: Fluid Mechanics & Thermodynamics

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.  
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 217M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 217L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR217: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR217M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR217L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR217: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR217M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR217L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course examines how forces arise in static fluids. It will enable students to carry out basic calculations on fluid motion and to introduce the basics of fluid machinery. It will introduce the behaviour and effects of turbulent and laminar flow in pipes. and also examine thermodynamic quantities, their relationships and application to heat engines, boilers, condensers, nozzles, diffusers, turbines, compressors and throttles

  • ENGR 217M Fluid Mechanics: This course looks at fluid mechanics, hydrostatics – forces on plane areas, centre of pressure and forces on curved surfaces, Archimedes' Principle – buoyancy and stability of floating bodies and metacentric height, Bernoulli equation and flow measurement, steady-flow momentum equation, forces and fluid flow, turbulent and laminar regimes of flow, flow in pipes, Reynolds number, pressure drop and head loss in pipes, fluid machinery, centrifugal pumps and turbines.
  • ENGR 217L Thermodynamics: This course covers thermodynamics, thermodynamic equilibrium, reversible and irreversible processes, work, heat and the First Law of thermodynamics, heat capacities at constant volume and constant pressure, definition of expansivity and compressibility, internal energy and enthalpy, derivation of the adiabatic gas law, flow processes, the steady flow energy equation and its application to boilers, condensers, nozzles etc, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, properties of pure substances and the use of thermodynamic tables, the Carnot cycle, the Brayton cycle.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss the terms centre of pressure, metacentre, metacentric height and Reynolds number;
  • apply Archimedes' principle to situations involving buoyancy;
  • find the force on a submerged plane or curved surface;
  • determine whether a body will float stably and to estimate its period of rolling;
  • discuss the characteristics of laminar and turbulent flow;
  • estimate the pressure drop due to friction in a fluid flowing along a pipe;
  • apply Bernoulli's equation to situations of flow along a closed conduit;
  • describe a range of flow-measurement devices and to carry out calculations on them;
  • describe the basics of fluid machinery, including pumps and turbines;
  • apply the steady-flow momentum equation to situations involving fluid flow and forces;
  • apply basic thermodynamic relations for open and closed cycles to simple heat engines and flow processes;
  • discuss internal energy, entropy, enthalpy and the 2nd law of thermodynamics.

Outline Syllabus

The first term focuses on fluid mechanics whilst the second term moves onto thermodynamics. Details are listed below.

Fluid mechanics.

  • Hydrostatics: forces on plane areas, centre of pressure and forces on curved surfaces.
  • Archimedes' Principle: buoyancy and stability of floating bodies and metacentric height.
  • Bernoulli equation and flow measurement.
  • Steady-flow momentum equation, forces and fluid flow.
  • Turbulent and regimes of flow.
  • Flow in pipes, Reynolds number, pressure drop and head loss in pipes.
  • Fluid machinery.
  • Centrifugal pumps.
  • Turbines.

Thermodynamics.

  • Intensive and extensive thermodynamic quantities, the equation of state and the perfect gas law.
  • Thermodynamic equilibrium, reversible and irreversible processes.
  • Work, heat and the First Law of thermodynamics.
  • Heat capacities at constant volume and constant pressure.
  • Definition of expansivity and compressibility.
  • Internal energy and Enthalpy.
  • Derivation of the adiabatic gas law.
  • Flow processes, the steady flow energy equation and its application to boilers, condensers, nozzles, diffusers, turbines, compressors and throttles.
  • Entropy and the second law of thermodynamics.
  • Properties of pure substances and the use of thermodynamic tables.
  • The Carnot cycle.
  • The Brayton cycle.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Practical: 10%
  • Test: 10%

ENGR218: Materials & Design

  • Terms Taught: This module runs in weeks 3-7 of Summer Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

When engineers design a new artefact or component, they need to ensure that the parts are properly located and fastened in relation to one another, that they can bear the loads imposed on them and that they will survive for at least the design life of the assembly. Furthermore, all of these should be achieved in an economical way. This course introduces some of the important foundations of engineering design, and some key properties of materials, including those properties which may lead to failure if they are not taken into account. Finally, the course provides a short introduction to a finite-elements analysis package.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • carry out engineering design of certain kinds of assemblies and machines;
  • describe standard components such as rolling bearings, plain bearings, seals, keys, dowels and splines;
  • discuss the factors that determine tendency of materials to creep, to be subject to corrosion and to wear;
  • use a finite-elements package to make assessments of stresses and deflections in simple components.

Outline Syllabus

  • Standard components such as rolling bearings, plain bearings, seals, keys, dowels and splines. Kinematic design.
  • Degrees of freedom.
  • Surface finish, tolerances, limits and fits.
  • Materials properties and selection.
  • Choice of manufacturing process.
  • Use of adhesives and comparisons with other fixing methods.
  • Creep: definition, creep testing, empirical creep laws, stress relaxation and simple creep calculations.
  • Corrosion: dry corrosion and simple models of the process, wet corrosion, galvanic cells and corrosion protection.
  • Wear: the nature of surfaces, static and kinetic friction, adhesive and abrasive wear.
  • Finite Elements: experience of using a FE package.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 60%
  • Test: 40%

ENGR227: Electromagnetics & RF Engineering

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 227M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 227L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR227: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR227M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR 227L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR227: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR 227M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR 227L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course will provide a working knowledge of electromagnetism, including an understanding of the effect of metals, semiconductors and dielectrics. It will provide insight into electronic transport in metal and semiconductor materials and introduce the theory and design of RF circuits, with a focus on industrial examples such as microwave ovens, particle accelerators, communication systems and Radar.

  • ENGR 227M Electromagnetics: This course includes electromagnetic processes, electrostatics: electric charge; electric field; electric flux density; electrostatic potential; inverse square law of force; dielectric polarisation and permittivity; capacitance; energy storage; parasitic capacitance and electric screening; steady electric currents: current density; resistivity and conductivity; general form of Ohm’s law; power density and power dissipation in conductors; magnetostatics: magnetic field; magnetic flux density; Biot-Savart law; magnetic force on a current-carrying conductor; hard and soft ferromagnetic materials; permeability; hysteresis; permanent magnets; and simple magnetic circuits. Electromagnetic induction: Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law; the simple transformer; parasitic inductance and earth loops; energy storage in magnetised iron; hysteresis loss; and eddy current loss. Maxwell’s Equations: displacement current.
  • ENGR 227L Radio Frequency Engineering: This course looks at RF Engineering, transmission of data and basic RF receiver architecture, matching networks, first order filters, oscillators and mixers, characteristic impedance, reflection/standing wave ratios, Smith charts and scattering parameters and applications to broadcasting and communication systems.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • describe the concepts of potential, charge, field and capacitance;
  • use Ampere, Faraday and Coulomb law;
  • discuss the role of charge carriers and the electronic transport theory of metallic and semiconducting materials;
  • discuss the differences between paramagnetic, diamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials;
  • calculate the magnitude and direction of the electric field strength;
  • discuss Gauss theorem and the relationship of electric flux to electric charge;
  • describe the process of magnetisation of iron, hysteresis and eddy current loss;
  • analyse induction and inductance;
  • calculate the energy stored in a magnetic field;
  • use the decibel scale;
  • analyse AC lumped circuits and discuss LR, RC and LCR circuits;
  • discuss the operation of oscillators;
  • carry out noise calculations for RF systems;
  • calculate component values and transmission line dimensions to match impedances;
  • use a Smith Chart to analyse an RF circuit.

Outline Syllabus

The first term considers electromagnetic theory whilst the second term focuses on RF engineering. Details are listed below:

Electromagnetic theory:

  • Electrostatics: electric charge; electric field; electric flux density; electrostatic potential; inverse square law of force; dielectric polarisation and permittivity; capacitance; energy storage; parasitic capacitance and electric screening
  • Steady electric currents: current density; resistivity and conductivity; general form of Ohm’s law; power density and power dissipation in conductors; continuity equation; generalisations of Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws
  • Magnetostatics: magnetic field; magnetic flux density; Biot-Savart law; magnetic circuit law; calculation of magnetic flux density; magnetic force on a current-carrying conductor; hard and soft ferromagnetic materials; permeability; hysteresis; permanent magnets; and simple magnetic circuits
  • Electromagnetic induction: Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law; self and mutual inductance; the simple transformer; parasitic inductance and earth loops; energy storage in magnetised iron; hysteresis loss; and eddy current loss
  • Maxwell’s Equations: displacement current
  • Transmission Lines theory, Velocity and impedance of transmission lines, Scattering parameters, Antennas, Fibre optics, Waveguides, Fusion and accelerators

RF Engineering.

  • The decibel scale.
  • Complex number review.
  • AC circuit analysis.
  • LCR Circuits
  • Band theory of solids, semiconductors
  • RF transmission of data and basic RF receiver architecture
  • Matching networks, first order filters, p-n junctions, transistors, oscillators and mixers
  • Characteristic impedance, reflection/standing wave ratios, Smith charts and scattering parameters
  • Applications to broadcasting and communication systems

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Practical: 20%
  • Test: 20%

ENGR228: Digital Electronics

  • Terms Taught: This module runs in weeks 3-7 of Summer Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course introduces fundamental skills in digital logic design programming, development implementation and debugging. The course aims are: to understand and use the concept of parallelism; to help develop instincts as to what design approach should be adopted, depending on the targeted application; to show how to validate a circuits’ functionality through the use of simulation analysis and how to implement design changes in order to improve upon its performance, both in terms of maximum operating clock speed and hardware resource minimisation; to acquire experience in using FPGA devices which are fundamental in ASICs development and verification.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • design digital logic circuits for a range of applications;
  • apply state-of-the-art digital logic design development and verification methods;
  • use the most prevalent programming language in digital design for Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs), i.e. VHDL;
  • discuss PLDs in general and FPGAs in particular, including the major steps involved in digital circuit design development and implementation;
  • use practical skills gained from hands-on experience of FPGAs containing development boards.

Outline Syllabus

  • Digital logic design targeting programmable logic devices, in particular FPGAs (Field-Programmable Gate Arrays).
  • Major steps involved in modern digital logic design development such as simulation, time/hardware resources optimisation and floorplanning.
  • The preferred programming language will be VHDL while target FPGA devices will belong to the Xilinx family.
  • The students will use a widely employed vendor specific software development environment (such as Xilinx ISE 10.1, Mentor Graphics ModelSim).

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 60%
  • Test: 40%

ENGR236: Nuclear Engineering

  • Terms Taught: Full Year course.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 236M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term only.
    • ENGR 236L which can be taken separately in Lent Term only.
    • NOTE:  If you are studying with us for a Full Academic Year and you select a course that has full year and part year variants, you will not be allowed to take only part of the course.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR236: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR236M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR236L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR236: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR236M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR236L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This module aims to introduce fundamental concepts in nuclear engineering and to provide a historical context to the subject. It will introduce fundamentals of radioactivity, the fission process and reactor design and will provide the generic chemistry background in a nuclear context, with a focus on uranium and its compounds.

ENGR 236M Nuclear Engineering: This course introduces essential concepts and definitions and historical aspects: Roentgen, the Curies, Otto Hahn, the Fermi pile, Heisenberg, Manhattan project, Enrichment issues, Klaus Fuchs and the UK programme, the influence of accidents. It includes radioactivity fundamentals, neutrons: properties and processes, reaction modes, cross-section, 1/v and related resonances, important reactions ie boron, uranium and hydrogen, the fission process: energy economics, mass fragment distribution, energy dependence of cross section, neutron multiplicity, thermal, above threshold and fast fission, criticality and control: mass, moderation and geometry, s-curve and feedback mechanisms, the four- and six-factor formulae; reactor designs: Captain Rickover, Pile 1 and 2, Magnox etc; shielding physics.

ENGR 236L Nuclear Chemistry: The course covers nuclear chemistry, electronic structure: orbitals, electron transitions, valency, bonding and structure: ionic and covalent bonding, oxidation and reduction. Uranium and its compounds: actinide chemistry, oxides and fluorides of uranium, uranyl nitrate, working with chemicals: COSHH and COMAH, nuclear fuel manufacture: solvent extraction, ion exchange, ore concentrate to UO3, UO3 to UF4, Magnox fuel, UF6 production, enrichment, UO2 production, AGR fuel production and other fuels, nuclear fuel reprocessing.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss fundamental nuclear engineering concepts and define keywords;
  • discuss historical aspects that have influenced nuclear engineering;
  • discuss fundamentals of radioactivity and describe the fission process;
  • discuss the concepts of criticality and control;
  • compare a range of reactor designs with the generic nuclear reactor;
  • describe how uranium mined in the ground fits into generic chemistry concepts;
  • describe how different compounds of uranium enable it to be extracted, refined and separated.

Outline Syllabus

The first term introduces nuclear engineering, whilst the second term focuses on nuclear chemistry. Details are listed below.

Nuclear engineering.

  • Introduction to essential concepts and definitions.
  • Historical aspects: Roentgen, the Curies, Otto Hahn, the Fermi pile, Heisenberg, Manhattan project, Enrichment issues, Klaus Fuchs and the UK programme, the influence of accidents. Radioactivity fundamentals.
  • Neutrons: properties and processes, reaction modes, cross-section, 1/v and related resonances.
  • Important reactions i.e. boron, uranium and hydrogen.
  • The fission process: energy economics, mass fragment distribution, energy dependence of cross section, neutron multiplicity, thermal, above threshold and fast fission.
  • Criticality and control: mass, moderation and geometry, s-curve and feedback mechanisms.
  • The four- and six-factor formulae.
  • The generic nuclear reactor.
  • Reactor designs: Captain Rickover, Pile 1 and 2, Magnox etc.
  • Shielding physics.

Nuclear chemistry.

  • Electronic structure: orbitals, electron transitions, valency.
  • Bonding and structure: ionic and covalent bonding, dative covalent bonding, physical bonds, metal ligand interactions, oxidation and reduction.
  • Uranium and its compounds: actinide chemistry, oxides and fluorides of uranium.
  • Uranyl nitrate.
  • Working with chemicals: COSHH and COMAH.
  • Nuclear fuel manufacture: solvent extraction, ion exchange,ore to ore concentrate, ore concentrate to UO3, UO3 to UF4, Magnox fuel, UF6 production, enrichment, UO2 production, AGR fuel production and other fuels.
  • Nuclear fuel reprocessing: pros and cons of reprocessing, reactor to receipt, purex process, decladding and dissolution, off gas treatment, conditioning, chemical separation, separation of U, Pu and fission products.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Test: 20%

ENGR238: Decommissioning and Sustainability

  • Terms Taught: This module runs in weeks 3-7 of Summer term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits.
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites:
    • Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.
    • Core module for the following Engineering undergraduate degree schemes:
  • BEng / MEng Sustainable Engineering.
  • MEng Nuclear Engineering.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss a range of issues in relation to the project management of major activities;
  • describe the issues associated with the formulation of safety cases;
  • create and design solutions to meet ?real-world' engineering needs;
  • develop effective arguments based on evidence;
  • follow guidelines associated with safety in an industrial context;
  • discuss constraints imposed on industry;
  • interpret existing legislation on product development
  • demonstrate an understanding of the discipline that can be built upon towards further career progression and potentially chartered or incorporated engineer status.

Outline Syllabus

An introduction to nuclear, oil, gas and chemical plant decommissioning. The decommissioning market and related organisations. Facility characterisation and final survey. Planning and costing of decommissioning projects. Radiation issues. Health and safety. Worker and environmental protection. Demolition techniques and technologies. Robotics and automation. Waste decontamination, packaging, transport and disposal. Illustrative case studies of international decommissioning projects. Introduction to the economic, society and environmental context of product design and operation, including recycling and the reuse of materials. Waste disposal and the law. Land remediation. WEEE directive, producer responsibility consumer vs. citizen, Environmental credential vs. functionality perception. Ethical implications of technology development.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 60%
  • Test: 40%

ENGR261: Reactors and Equipment

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term Only.
  • US Credits: 3 US credits
  • ECTS Credits: 6 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This module is to form part of the new Chemical Engineering degree scheme.

This module is intended to provide students with an understanding of the requirements for chemical reactor design, building on their knowledge of kinetics and thermodynamics and introducing concepts of batch and continuous process, series and parallel reactors, and catalysis to equip them with the necessary tools to design effective and efficient reactors such as those encountered in the chemical industry.

Educational Aims

This module aims to help students to understand the principles of chemical engineering; enhance their problem solving skills; communicate their conclusions to both an expert and non-expert audience; and to apply their knowledge to real world situations.

This module aims to introduce the concept of reactor design and its relationship to system kinetics; to introduce the differences between various types of reactors; and to enable students to select appropriate reactors to carry out specific reactions.

Outline Syllabus

Reaction rates.

Ideal reactors. Batch reactors. Continuous reactors. Graphical interpretation of Design Equations.

Sizing and analysis of Ideal Reactors. Homogeneous reaction (Batch and Continuous Reactors). Systems of continuous reactors (Series/parallel). Recycle.

Multiple reactions. Conversion, Selectivity and Yield. Classification of reactions. Reactor design and analysis (Series (consecutive) / parallel / Independent / mixed reactions).

Use of energy balance in reactor design and analysis. Isothermal reactors. Adiabatic reactors. Continuous reactors. Feed/product heat exchangers.

Heterogeneous catalysis.

Non-ideal reactors.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Coursework: 40%

ENGR262: Particle Technology and Separation Processes

  • Terms Taught: Full Year Only.
  • Also Available: This module is also available as two shorter courses:
    • ENGR 262M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term Only
    • ENGR 262L which can be taken seperately in Lent term only.
  • US Credits:
    • ENGR262: 4 semester credits
    • ENGR262M: 2 semester credits
    • ENGR262L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits:
    • ENGR262: 8 ECTS
    • ENGR262M: 4 ECTS
    • ENGR262L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

The course aims to:

  • introduce advanced mass transfer, particulate technology and separation processes, and their importance
  • Describe the underlying principles associated with mass transfer, particle technology and separation processes
  • Provide an understanding of the technological implications of mass transfer, particle technology and separation processes
  • Give a sound basis for confidently designing and selecting processes involving reactants and products of any physical form
  • Give a good understanding of health, safety and environmental considerations when working with particulates.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate subject specific knowledge, understanding and skills and have the ability to:

  • Understand advanced mass transfer processes
  • Understand interdependence of elements of a complex system
  • Integrate processing steps into a sequence
  • Apply analysis techniques
  • Understand powder characterization techniques and specify appropriate data required for further processing and to ensure quality of the final product
  • Select methods for preparing desired products and understand the governing principles behind their operation
  • Demonstrate understanding of particulate interactions with fluids and the how these govern the operation of solid / liquid and solid / gas processes with particular application to those studied in the course
  • Be able to select the appropriate processes for the objectives given a critical understanding of a range of options available and have an appreciation of the compromises which may have to be made.
  • Have knowledge of some common industrial processes and be able to explain that operation from fundamental principles. Be able to apply this knowledge to unfamiliar examples.
  • Appreciate Health, Safety and Environmental considerations of working with particulates and relevant process equipment.

Outline Syllabus

Particle Technology and separation processes

  • Motivation of the use particulate solids, their importance to society and introduction to particulate solids and their characterisation
  • Particulate processing and handling at various size scales with relevant examples.
  • Particle production.
  • Particulate size reduction and enlargement techniques and applications
  • Particulate motion in a fluid as a building block for fundamental understanding of particle / fluid interactions in reactors for efficient process design.
  • Packed particulate beds design and applications
  • Fluidised bed reactor designs and applications
  • Health, Safety and environmental aspects of working with particulates

Separation processes

  • Separation processes for particulate materials and process selection
  • Solid / liquid processes – Sedimentation, filtration, centrifuges, flocculation.
  • Solid gas processes – Filtration, cyclones, electrostatic
  • Solid / solid processes – Leaching

Advanced mass transfer and separation processes

Interphase and general mass transfer

General introduction to turbulent mass transfer. Film theory and surface renewal. Two-film theory. Individual and overall mass transfer coefficients. Steady state co-current and counter-current processes (operating and equilibrium lines). Mass transfer with continuous contact: height equivalent to a theoretical plate, the transfer unit, determination of the number of transfer units, determination of the number of transfer units, height of a transfer unit. Mass transfer with discontinuous contact.

Gas absorption

Gas-liquid equilibria. Choice of solvent for absorption. Counter-current and co-current flow. Minimum liquid-gas ratio for absorbers. Number of plates using absorption factor. Absorption columns.

Distillation

Flash distillation. Bubble and dew points. Flash curves for binary systems. Plate columns. Methods of McCabe-Thiele and Ponchon Savarit. Underwood equation. Fenske equation. Gilliland and Erbar-Maddox plots. Azeotropic systems. Van Laar equation. Margules equation. Azeotropic and extractive systems. Equipment. Control of distillation columns.

Solvent extraction and leaching

Review of processes and applications. Review of equipment. Single stage contact. Totally immiscible systems - stagewise contact. Partially miscible systems - stagewise contact. Continuous column contactor design.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Coursework: 20%

ENGR263: Mass transfer

  • Terms Taught: Full Year Only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

The module aims to develop detailed skills in an important area of chemical engineering. Give students numerical, analytical and laboratory skills to address a wide range of engineering problems, based on application examples in mass and heat transfer. Understanding of how their designs and process selections comply with economic constraints and current health, safety and environmental regulations. Enhance problem solving design, and analysis skills. Apply knowledge to real world situations. Communicate their conclusions to both expert and non-expert audiences

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate:

  • Create and design solution to meet real world chemical engineering needs
  • Apply the principles and knowledge gained in this area to new and unfamiliar situations
  • Critically analyse competing processes and select most appropriate.
  • Use this knowledge to study differing solutions to engineering problems
  • Think and argue critically
  • Plan and organise their work.

Outline Syllabus

Review of phase equilibria and chemical process principles

  • Introduction to mass transfer.
  • Choice of separation processes.
  • Stage concept.
  • Batch and continuous contact processes.

Molecular and convective diffusion

  • Rate equation and Fick's law.
  • Description of gas and liquid diffusion.
  • Measurement and prediction of diffusion coefficient.
  • Film resistance and film mass transfer coefficients.
  • The concentration gradient.
  • Evaluation and determination of film and overall mass transfer coefficients.

Mass transfer equipment

  • Fluid-fluid contacting equipment.
  • The elements of mass transfer equipment.
  • Types of packed column.
  • Types of plate columns.
  • Pressure drop over columns.
  • Flow rates and stability of operations.

Mass transfer separation by distillation

  • equilibrium and operating lines,
  • material and enthalpy balances,
  • Sorel's method,
  • McCabe-Thiele,
  • q-lines,
  • reflux ratio,
  • stage efficiencies.
  • Effect of reflux ratio and q-lines on number of stages.
  • Overall and Murphree efficiencies.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Coursework: 20%

ENGR266: Fluid mechanics and Chemical engineering thermodynamics

  • Terms Taught: Full Year Course
  • Also Available:   This module is available as two courses:ENGR266M which can be taken separately in Michaelmas Term onlyENGR266L which can betaken seperately in Lent Term only.
  • US Credits:   ENGR266: 4 semester credits. ENGR266M: 2 semester credits ENGR266L: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: ENGR266: 8 ECTS ENGR266M: 4 ECTS ENGR266L: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites:   Level 1 Engineering or equivalent.

Course Description

This course examines how forces arise in static fluids. It will enable students to carry out basic calculations on fluid motion and to introduce the basics of fluid machinery. It will introduce the behaviour and effects of turbulent and laminar flow in pipes.

ENGR266M Chemical Thermodynamics:

ENGR266L Fluid Mechanics: This course looks at fluid mechanics, hydrostatics forces on plane areas, centre of pressure and forces on curved surfaces, Archimedes' Principle buoyancy and stability of floating bodies and metacentric height, Bernoulli equation and flow measurement, steady-flow momentum equation, forces and fluid flow, turbulent and laminar regimes of flow, flow in pipes, Reynolds number, pressure drop and head loss in pipes, fluid machinery, centrifugal pumps and turbines.

Educational Aims

  • On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
  • ? discuss the terms centre of pressure, metacentre, metacentric height and Reynolds number;
  • ? apply Archimedes' principle to situations involving buoyancy;
  • ? find the force on a submerged plane or curved surface;
  • ? determine whether a body will float stably and to estimate its period of rolling;
  • ? discuss the characteristics of laminar and turbulent flow;
  • ? estimate the pressure drop due to friction in a fluid flowing along a pipe;
  • ? apply Bernoulli's equation to situations of flow along a closed conduit;
  • ? describe a range of flow-measurement devices and to carry out calculations on them;
  • ? describe the basics of fluid machinery, including pumps and turbines;
  • ? apply the steady-flow momentum equation to situations involving fluid flow and forces;

Outline Syllabus

The first term focuses on fluid mechanics whilst the second term moves onto thermodynamics. Details are listed below.

Chemical Thermodynamics

Fluid mechanics.

Hydrostatics: forces on plane areas, centre of pressure andforces on curved surfaces.

Archimedes' Principle: buoyancy and stability of floating bodies andmetacentric height.

Bernoulli equationandflow measurement.

Steady-flow momentum equation, forces and fluid flow.

Turbulent and regimes of flow.

Flow in pipes, Reynolds number, pressure drop and head loss in pipes.

Fluid machinery.

Centrifugal pumps.

Turbines.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 80%
  • Practical: 10%
  • Test: 10%

ENGR313: Power Electronics and Applications

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 US credits
  • ECTS Credits:   8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Engineering majors only.

Course Description

Topics to be covered may include:

  • ? Introduction to Power Electronic Systems: Introduction and applications of electrical drives, power semiconductor devices and controllability, controllable switches.
  • ? Power Electronic Converters (rectifiers): Uncontrolled rectifiers (single-phase and three-phase), fully- controlled rectifiers (single-phase and three-phase).

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

To develop students' ability to analyse engineering problems, create and design solutions to meet real-world engineering needs, think and argue critically, and plan organise their work.

This course provides students with comprehensive knowledge and understanding of power electronics and applications. It develops understanding of scientific principles and methodology of power semiconductor devices, power electronic converters, dc/ac motor drives and the applications and needs for high power electronic switches/converters in the electric power utility industry.

Outline Syllabus

Topics to be covered may include:

  • ? Introduction to Power Electronic Systems: Introduction and applications of electrical drives, power semiconductor devices and controllability, controllable switches
  • ? Power Electronic Converters (rectifiers): Uncontrolled rectifiers (single-phase and three-phase), fully- controlled rectifiers (single-phase and three-phase),
  • ? Power Electronic Converters (choppers): Pulse-width modulation, step-down (buck) converter, step-up (boost) converter, step-down / step-up (buck-boost) converter, Cuk converter, full-bridge converter, dc to dc converter comparison
  • ? Power Electronic Converters (Inverters): Pulse-width-modulated inverters, selection of switching frequency and frequency modulation ratio, PWM with bipolar voltage switching, PWM with unipolar voltage switching three-phase inverters
  • ? Snubber circuits: Function and types of Snubber circuits, use of Snubber circuits (with diodes, thyristors, transistors), turn on/off snubber
  • ? dc motor drive applications: dc servo drives, adjustable speed dc drives
  • ? Induction motor drive applications: Speed control by varying stator frequency and voltage, variable frequency drives (PWM-VSI, square-wave VSI, CSI)
  • ? Synchronous motor drive applications: Synchronous motor drives with sinusoidal waveforms and trapezoidal waveforms, Load commutated inverter drives, cycloconverters
  • ? Residential and industrial applications: Space heating and air conditioning, induction heating and electric welding, integral half-cycle controllers
  • ? Electric utility applications: HVDC transmission, Static VAR compensators, Interconnection of renewable energy sources and energy storage systems to the utility grid

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Progress Test: 10%
  • Exam: 80%

ENGR314: Computational Fluid Dynamics

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 US credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Engineering majors only.

Course Description

Students will gain an appreciation of the vast potential, but also the limitations of utilising CFD for complex engineering analysis and design problems. They will become familiar with the basic theory of CFD, large parts of which are common to other computational disciplines, and they will acquire expertise on how to use modern CFD tools routinely used by the industry. Moreover, the practical matters to which they are exposed in this course will also strengthen their knowledge of general fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, hydraulics and turbomechinery.

Educational Aims

The aim of the CFD module is to introduce students to a) the foundations of CFD, including finite-difference and finite volume methods, numerical solution of partial differential equations, Von Neumann stability analysis, and b) the advanced use of CFD for solving complex fluid dynamics problems crucial to several engineering branches, including turbomachinery, hydraulic, automotive, aeronautical, renewable energy, environmental and chemical engineering. The knowledge of the fundamental theoretical elements of CFD provided in this course enables students to correctly set-up and solve problems in the aforementioned areas using state-of-the-art commercial CFD software. The lab-based component of the course aims to provide the students with advanced expertise on using key-components of CFD software, including grid generation systems, CFD solvers (including choice of key physical modelling and numerical control parameters), and solution post-processors (including flow visualisation systems).

Outline Syllabus

The course will consist of 14 lectures and 6 laboratory sessions.

The lectures will discuss finite-difference and finite volume schemes, explicit and implicit integration methods, stability analysis, the main features of the integral and differential forms of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, characteristics theory and boundary conditions, boundary layers, formulation and solution of governing equations in rotating frames, basic theory of turbulence and numerical modelling thereof. Most of the discussed theory will be further explained by means of simple model equations such the linear advection equation and the unsteady heat transfer equation. The presented methods (e.g. finite-difference schemes and stability analysis) will be applied to the numerical solution of these model equations to further consolidate the understanding of the presented material.

In the laboratory sessions, students will be taught how to use a state-of-the-art CFD commercial solver used by many diverse industries in the UK and worldwide. More precisely they will learn how to generate high-quality CFD meshes, how to import CAD-based geometries in the grid generation system, how to run and monitor the solution of the CFD solver, how to validate the solution accuracy and the computational performance of the solver, how to postprocess computed solutions, and, overall, to exploit the vast potential of CFD as an analysis and design tool. Considered fluid dynamics applications will include gas turbine, wind turbine, car aerodynamics, and chemical and process engineering problems.

Assessment Proportions

  • Individual Project 30%
  • Exam: 70%

ENGR333: Analogue Electronics

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Electronic Systems Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce time and frequency domain representations of analogue circuits; and to examine the principles of analogue integrated circuit and filter design, including linear network transfer functions. It will introduce the range of analogue components available and encourage you to develop the design skills required by industry, both in the context of analogue circuits and in the wider engineering discipline.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • analyse circuits in the time and frequency domains;
  • analyse and evaluate fundamental analogue circuit building blocks;
  • describe the composition of active and passive filters.

Outline Syllabus

  • Transistors: MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) models; capacitances; bipolar transistor operation and models.
  • Transistor circuits for Integrated Circuits: current mirrors and IC biasing; two stage amplifiers; Op Amp design; high-frequency analysis; feedback and sensitivity; noise analysis.
  • Fundamentals of linear continuous time filters: linear network transfer functions; poles and zeros; characterisation of sinusoidal, step and impulse responses; first and second order low pass, high pass and band pass transfer functions; sinusoidal and step responses; design of passive and active circuits for synthesis of transfer functions, parasitics and filter precision.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR335: Optoelectronics and wireless communications

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this module is to look at the fundamental components of optical communication and wireless systems and information theory, including the physical propagation of signals, electromagnetism and signal analysis. The module will introduce the theory of using optoelectronics and radio waves for telecommunications; and will examine the main types of antenna and their properties.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of optical communications;
  • Define the main optical components in a communication system;
  • Explain the fundamentals of wireless systems, transmitters and receivers;
  • Carry out calculations on radio transmission antennas and coding;
  • Explain the use of radio waves for telecommunications;
  • Describe the main types of antenna, their properties and uses;
  • Explain the reasons for the design choices made in a variety of communications systems.

Outline Syllabus

  • Optoelectronics: overview of optical communication systems; optical components; optical sources.
  • Wireless communications: electromagnetic spectrum; elements of radio waves propagation; transmitter; receiver; link budget; types of wireless networks; Antennas: waves in free space; dipole; loop and aperture antennas; antenna arrays; directivity; gain; effective area.
  • Revision of information theory: channel capacity; Shannon’s Law; noise.
  • Revision of modulation: AM; FM; PSK etc. Access: TDM; FDM; CDM.
  • System case studies: Internet fibre cables backbone, radio and TV broadcasting.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR336: Digital Signal Processing

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 US credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Electronic Systems Engineering, Mechatronic Engineering andComputer Systems Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to digital techniques for processing signals, including Fourier transforms and digital filtering. Students will learn about discrete time and frequency domain signals. This has many applications in modern day communication systems. Students will get an understanding of discrete time and frequency domains, become familiar with time and frequency domain analysis and understand how to design figital filters. The course will demonstrate digital signals processing techniques through the use of MATLAB. This will gives the students a good knowledge of a general purpose code commonly used in Engineering enviroments. Students will learn how to use MATLAB for digital calculations.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students should be able to explain and apply the key principles of sampling continuous time signals; understand the principles of Fourier Transform and z-transform; be able to apply Fourier Transform and z-transform to the analysis of signals and linear time-invariant systems; understand the principles of convolution and apply it to the analysis of linear time-invariant systems; be able to program in MATLAB independently; critically analyse, design and implement finite impulse response and impulse response filters in MATLAB.

This module will also develop students’ ability to analyse engineering problems, create and design solutions to meet ‘real-world’ engineering needs, think and argue critically, and plan and organise their work.

Outline Syllabus

Students will learn the fundamentals of digital signal processing. Details are listed below.

Signal sampling. Analogue to Digital Conversion. Discrete Time and space domains. Time and frequency domain analysis. Fourier theory and transforms (discrete, fast, short time, autocorreleation). Linear Time-Invariant Systems. Convolution. Digital filtering (impulse response, IIR, FIR, difference equation, filter design). Z-plane analysis. Implementation in MATLAB (practical element).

Assessment Proportions

  • 70% Exam
  • 20% Coursework
  • 10% Test

ENGR352: Vibration Analysis and Applications

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to develop your skills and abilities in mechanics, particularly in relation to mechanisms and linkages, balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery, and flexible systems which are able to vibrate. It will teach you about some common components of machinery and the engineering science that is necessary to analyse and design them.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • use principles of forces and moments equilibrium (with inertia forces) to estimate the forces acting on rigid bodies that are accelerating in two dimensions;
  • use kinematic principles to relate displacements and velocities (and accelerations in certain special cases, e.g. the slider-crank mechanism of a typical reciprocating engine) of points on linkages of rigid bodies;
  • find the location of instantaneous centres in a linkage (such as swing-arm centres and roll centre of a vehicle suspension), and apply the instantaneous-centre method to investigate the velocities of points on a linkage;
  • find the velocity of any point of selected planar mechanisms using velocity diagrams and the velocity image theorem;
  • find the acceleration of any point of selected planar mechanisms using acceleration diagrams and the acceleration image theorem;
  • apply the idea of energy conservation to ideal systems (work in = work out).

Outline Syllabus

  • Kinematics and kinetics of mechanisms: velocity diagrams; instantaneous centres; simple cases of acceleration.
  • Two-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems: natural frequencies (eigenvalues) and modes of vibration (eigenvectors); matrix methods.
  • Balancing rotating and reciprocating equipment.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 10%
  • Exam: 90%

ENGR353: Design and Manufacturing

  • Terms Taught:  Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to examine a range of manufacturing processes, including metal cutting, machining and automation; and to consider the role of computers and information systems in the operation of manufacturing equipment. It will develop your insight into the link between design and manufacture and to improve your generic design skills.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the process of machining;
  • understand the principles of work holding and fixturing;
  • prepare a process plan;
  • estimate times for manufacture of simple jobs;
  • understand the principles of CAPPE;
  • set out a time estimate for a manual or robotic assembly process;
  • understand the principles of DFMA;
  • give an account of the relationship between CNC, FMS and CIM, including the information structures needed to achieve integration;
  • have an understanding of key issues in modern manufacturing, especially regarding tooling and other investment 'hot-spots';
  • appreciate current enabling technologies such as rapid prototyping and the use of in-cycle gauging and SPC to promote 'right first time'.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction and review of metal cutting manufacturing processes.
  • Mechanical machining theory. Jigs and fixtures.
  • Cost estimating.
  • CNC and ancillary equipment.
  • FMS and Parts Classification.
  • Group technology.
  • Assembly automation and DFMA.
  • CIM structures.
  • Process choices in relation to product specifications, quantities and tooling options.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENGR354: Engineering Materials

  • Terms Taught:  Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronic Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of this course is to examine in detail the physical behaviour of a wide range of engineering materials, including their toughness, creep, fatigue and corrosion. The course will also consider methods for detecting flaws in structures and materials and judge how different materials impact on the general analysis and design of mechanical engineering components and structures.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the difference between toughness and fracture toughness of materials and how the latter is applied to determine a materials susceptibility to fast fracture;
  • understand the nature of fatigue, the differences between high and low cycle fatigue, have an appreciation of fatigue testing and how to carry out simple fatigue calculations;
  • understand the nature of creep, have an appreciation of creep testing, appreciate the basis of semi-empirical creep laws and simple creep calculations;
  • appreciate the factors controlling dry and wet corrosion, have an understanding of the relative ranking of the susceptibility of materials to both forms of corrosion;
  • understand dry and wet corrosion models and the differences between them and appreciate the principal approaches to corrosion protection;
  • understand the basic mechanics of friction and wear and understand some of the methods of reducing their deleterious effects;
  • understand the main methods of non-destructive detection of flaws and cracks and to appreciate their advantages and limitations.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to toughness, critical fracture toughness and simple fracture mechanics.
  • Introduction to fatigue, the fatigue classification system, empirical fatigue laws and simple crack extension – stress cycle calculations.
  • Definition of creep, creep testing, empirical creep laws, stress relaxation and simple creep calculations.
  • Dry corrosion and simple models of the process, wet corrosion, galvanic cells and corrosion protection.
  • The nature of surfaces, static and kinetic friction, adhesive and abrasive wear.
  • Non-destructive methods of crack/flaw detection – their advantages and limitations.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR355: Machine Elements

  • Terms Taught: Mihcaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronic Engineering students only.

Course Description

The aim of the course is to familiarise you with a range of interesting problems involving elements of machines and with the generic techniques for analysing them. You will develop your skills in analysing some commonly-occurring machine elements, particularly gears and rolling elements, screw threads and plain bearings.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • establish the geometry of contacts between bodies, including relative radii of curvature;
  • estimate stresses and loads between bodies at such contacts;
  • carry out calculations on involute gear geometry, including estimating load capacity;
  • estimate load capacity of plain (hydrodynamic) bearings;
  • describe how loads are carried by bolted joints.

Outline Syllabus

  • Contact stresses: relative radii of curvature of two bodies at their point of contact; estimation of load, given allowable stress, and of stress, given load.
  • Examples of ball and roller bearings, railway wheels etc.
  • Involute gears: geometry of gear teeth for constant velocity ratio; the involute tooth form and its geometry; contact stresses between gear teeth.
  • Screw threads: transmission of forces in bolted joints e.g. of forces on a cylinder head, thread forms, tightening torque and the influence of friction.
  • Methods of applying pretension.
  • Other types of fasteners.
  • Tribology: friction and lubrication, hydrodynamic lubrication, rectangular plane pad, journal bearings.
  • Reynolds' equation in one dimension, tilting-pad bearings and hydrostatic bearings.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 100%

ENGR361: Nuclear Medicine

  • Terms Taught:  Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the nuclear engineering systems used in medical applications throughout the world. It will introduce you to the concept of radiobiological effects. You will review three main aspects of nuclear medicine: external beam radiotherapy, internal radiotherapy and radiology. On successful completion of this course, you will be able to understand the essential role that nuclear techniques fulfil in medicine and have an appreciation of where current research trends are taking the field.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the difference between radiotherapy and radiology
  • identify an appropriate method for the treatment of a given medical condition i.e. the association of proton therapy viz. cancer of the cornea; iodine treatment for the thyroid cancer
  • explain the principal parts of key nuclear medical systems such as LINACs, source deployment facilities, PET scanners etc.
  • identify specific isotopes and explain how their properties relate to their common uses such as Tc99m for use in PET etc.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to the effect of radiation on human tissue.
  • External beam radiotherapy: history, methods, devices and techniques.
  • Internal radiotherapeutic methods: sources and techniques.
  • Radiology and related imaging methods.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%

ENGR362: Nuclear Instrumentation

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of instrumentation that is specific to nuclear applications. It will provide you with knowledge of the common nuclear instrumentation systems that might encounter in industry, medicine and research and provide an indication of where current research is taking this area forward.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will:

  • be aware of the principal radiation detection modalities in use throughout the world;
  • understand and be able to set up some of these systems;
  • understand the statistical issues associated with the use of these instrumentation systems and the interpretation of their data;
  • be aware of the compromise between energy resolution and detection efficiency;
  • be aware of the safety issues associated with the use of nuclear instrumentation.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to nuclear instrumentation applications;
  • review of radiation detection modalities;
  • data analysis and interpretation;
  • the detection and measurement of energy, count level, energy spectra and dose;
  • safety issues associated with nuclear instrumentation.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%

ENGR363: Chemical Engineering Design and Process Safety

  • Terms Taught: Michalemas Term Only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits.
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Chemical Engineering students only.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Develop a design basis for a set of requirements (based on customer needs) and identify constraints
  • Ensure fitness for purpose (including maintenance, reliability and safety)
  • Adapt designs to meet new purposes and apply innovative design solutions
  • Solve material balance problems for multiple stage process operations
  • Identify principle successive steps required in the start of a process design
  • Explain how the principles of mass and energy balances and other process parameters are interrelated and combined in the design of processes and equipment to give a complete plant
  • Understand the principles of effective management of health and safety (including appropriate legislation)
  • Categorise hazards and refer to appropriate legislation.
  • Apply hazard identification techniques and analysis techniques in designs to support safety cases
  • Understand the concept of a safety case
  • Refer to a range of relevant design standards when generating designs

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to design
  • Design process overview in chemical engineering
  • Codes and standards
  • Safety factors
  • Degrees of freedom
  • Introduction to optimisation
  • Process design fundamentals
  • Mass balance and energy balance in composite process design
  • Use of flowsheeting, block diagrams, layouts
  • Use of piping and instrumentation diagrams
  • Process evaluation and costing
  • Materials selection
  • Reliability and maintenance
  • Site layout considerations
  • Process safety
  • Legislation
  • Definition of hazard and risk
  • Hazard categories
  • HAZID techniques and exercises
  • Risk assessment and qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques (e.g. HAZOP, FMECA, FTA, HRA)
  • Use of a safety case
  • Layers of protection in analysis.
  • Environmental impact and social responsibility
  • Lessons learnt in process design
  • Examples of lessons which can be learnt from past process design failures

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Coursework: 40%

ENGR364: Computer Applications in Process Engineering

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term Only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits.
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Normally for Chemical Engineering students only.

Course Description

The module introduces students to the use of computational data analysis, modelling and simulation in the field of chemical engineering using a mixture of visual basic and spreadsheet programming and one of the most widely employed professional chemical engineering software packages, ASPEN engineering suite.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • analyse and solve engineering problems using computers with confidence;
  • create and design solutions to meet ‘real-world’ engineering needs;
  • develop effective arguments based on evidence;
  • summarise findings and draw conclusions from practical work;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the discipline that can be built upon towards further career progression and potentially chartered or incorporated engineer status

Outline Syllabus

  • Principals of computational modelling and the application of relevant numerical methods to problems in chemical engineering;
  • Discretisation and numerical integration
  • Solution of large sets of simultaneous equations
  • Linear and non-linear regression and its application to problems such as the kinetics of complex reactions;
  • Optimisation algorithms.
  • Process simulation using software package ASPEN engineering suite:
  • use the ASPEN+ to prepare steady state process simulations in a format that can be understood and used or modified by other engineers
  • Application of ASPEN+ to process synthesis and the development of material and energy balances over process flowsheets.
  • Application of ASPEN+ to the process design of illustrative process equipment
  • Introduction to the ASPEN engineering suite dynamic simulations, parameter estimation, optimisation and experiment design;

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 60%
  • Coursework: 40%

ENGR371: Energy Conversion

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS

Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the physics, chemistry and engineering of common energy conversion processes; conventional thermal power generation (coal, oil, open-cycle and combined cycle gas turbines); and the ability to analyse system efficiency and CO2 emissions of different schemes. You will also study direct conversion including solar photovoltaic devices and fuel cells.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss and deduce numerically, the efficiency of a variety of energy conversion processes.

Outline Syllabus

  • Chemical conversion in combustion,
  • photovoltaics,
  • nuclear fission and fusion,
  • ethanol distillation,
  • steam power plants,
  • fuel cells.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 20%
  • Exam: 80%