Entrepreneurship

The following modules are available to incoming Study Abroad students interested in Entrepreneurship.

Alternatively you may return to the complete list of Study Abroad Subject Areas.

ENSI207: Entrepreneurship: Discovery and Practice

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No prerequisites

Course Description

The module will develop an introductory understanding of entrepreneurship as well as introducing you to experience a range of entrepreneurial skills (creativity, accessing resources, building networks and creating value) to enable to you understand key aspects of the entrepreneurial process. These skills will be transferable to many contexts, whether you wish to open your own business, be entrepreneurial in your career, or for working within Government or social enterprises.

Educational Aims

  • By the end of the module you should be able:

    • To critically discuss the role of entrepreneurs in society and their importance to the economy.

    • To apply key techniques in venture creation, such as creativity, opportunity recognition and presentation of business ideas.

    • To formulate a coherent and well-founded case to investors to back a new venture or project

    • To understand how appropriate resources to launch new products or a new business can be acquired and mobilised. 

    • To distinguish between the different stages in the process of entrepreneurship and business growth

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

Week 1: Introduction to the module and to entrepreneurship

Week 2: Creativity, opportunities and entrepreneurship

Week 3: Resources for entrepreneurship

Week 4: New venture creation and business start-up

Week 5: Growth through entrepreneurship

Week 6: Learning to be an entrepreneur

Week 7: Learning from failure, and learning through reflection

Week 8: Social and Community-Based entrepreneurship

Week 9: Entrepreneurship in diverse business settings

Week 10: In-Class test

Assessment Proportions

  • Test: 30%
  • Portfolio: 70%

ENSI210: Entrepreneurial mindset

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No prerequisites  

Course Description

Building upon Entrepreneurial Learning theories, this course prepares you to understand the core dimensions of an entrepreneurial mindset and guides you to find and assess opportunities, seek answers, gather resources and implement solutions regardless of you specific context or institutional constraints.

Educational Aims

The course aims to:

  • Explore the concepts of entrepreneurial mindset from a critical, challenging and contemporary perspective.

  • Examine how entrepreneurial mindset is not exclusive to the most common entrepreneurial context (startup) but pervades many other entrepreneurial contexts (large and small organizations, charities and social enterprises and governments) 

  • Help develop an understanding of how entrepreneurial learning is a core dimensions of entrepreneurial mindset.

  • Encourage reflective practice amongst course members.

  • Introduce and encourage an awareness of qualitative research amongst students.

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

 The intended outline is as follows:

Week  1 - Introduction to the course: defining entrepreneurial mindset

Week 2 - The core of entrepreneurial mindset: How entrepreneurs learn and develop

Week 3 - Entrepreneurial learning from role models

Week 4 - Entrepreneurial learning in communities

Week 5 - Entrepreneurial learning through experience

Week 6 - In class test based on a live interview with an entrepreneur in residence

Week 7 - Interview analysis

Week 8 - Analysing Interview Data

Week 9 - Writing a research report

Week 10- Conclusion

Assessment Proportions

In-class test           40%

Individual report  60%

ENSI212: Selling for Entrepreneurs

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No prerequisites 

Course Description

Being able to sell is an important skill for anyone pursuing an entrepreneurial career, whether this be to start their own business, or whilst working within an existing organization. This course will focus on two key areas. The first will be to understand what makes a good sales pitch and how to craft a powerful story that persuades customers or colleagues about the benefits of your venture (or project or idea) and also about yourself and your team. In this part of the course you will gain an understanding of persuasion, of selling and of creating legitimacy for entrepreneurial endeavours. Second, you will have a first-hand opportunity to experience selling and to work on refining your sales pitches. At the same time the course makes use of video exercises to enhance skill acquisition and also as a basis for self-reflection. The course will also involve our entrepreneurs in residence who will help to guide you through the process and provide feedback on your sales pitches.

Educational Aims

On successful completion of this module students will be able to...

  •  Describe and select the core components of the selling process within entrepreneurial organizations
  • Develop and deliver powerful stories that lead to sales within the context of entrepreneurial organizations

  • Effectively deal with objections from clients and team members

  • Discuss their personal experiences of selling within the context of entrepreneurial organizations

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

Week 1 - Selling as a life skill

Week 2 - The entrepreneurial sales model

Week 3 - Selling as stories: mastering the art of pitching ideas and people

Week 4 - Reflecting on the sales process

Week 5 - Consolidating selling skills: listening, memorising and enacting

Assessment Proportions

Project                          60%       

Reflective report              40%

ENSI214: Networking for Entrepreneurship

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No Prerequisites

Course Description

Networking and the development of social networks are believed to be critical for the foundation of entrepreneurial endeavours, both for the creation and growth of new ventures or entrepreneurial projects within larger firms. The purpose of this course is therefore to introduce students to the importance of networks for entrepreneurship. At the same time, the course will introduce key ideas and concepts underpinning networks / networking for entrepreneurship. Based on these key ideas, students will have an opportunity to practice and develop their own networking skills.

Educational Aims

The aim of this module is to:

- generate deeper understanding and appreciation of networks for the creation and growth of entrepreneurial projects and ventures (applicable to both start-ups and larger organizations)

- enable students to practice their networking skills in a safe environment

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

 Week 1: Networks and networking for entrepreneurship: an introduction (Introduction to the literature and to the course)

Week 2: Choosing who to network with (instrumental versus trust based relationships, reciprocity)

Week 3: Networking in context (importance of context - overview of different contexts and how they influence networking)

Week 4: Networking in practice (pointers to key areas of literature + role playing event)

Week 5: Reflection on networks and networking (group presentations which reflect on networking practice & provide links to literature)

Assessment Proportions

Group presentation (30%)          

Individual reflective essay (70%)

ENSI215: Funding Entrepreneurial Ventures

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No Prerequisites

Course Description

This module provides the necessary knowledge and skills to enable a student to understand the nature and characteristics of financial planning and management in the context of entrepreneurship. The module is divided into two parts. The finance part will enable students to understand all the key financial statements and concepts. The financing part of the module is focused on understanding the process of new venture financing,  typical funding sources, challenges and strategies.

Educational Aims

  • To enhance the student ability to interprete and understand different financial data for performance management;

  • to develop the student analytical and evaluation skills in relevance to both finance management and  fundraising;

  • to develop the student  effective communication skills.

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

  • Key Finance and Economic Concepts 
  • finance management in SMEs, e.g.,Planning and controlling finances
  • Cash Flow Management
  • Sources of Finance including bank loads
  • VC and crowdfunding

Assessment Proportions

Individual essay  100%

ENSI216: Product and Service Innovation

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only.
  • US Credits: 2 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 4 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: No Prerequisites

Course Description

The objective of this course is to equip you to meet the challenge in managing product and service innovation processes, especially in the small business environment. The aim is to inspire your enthusiasm and understanding of innovation and encourage the practice of tracking and evaluating the impact of innovations, so vital to anyone in business. These include building motivation, developing a critical and active approach to learning as well as developing ability to link understanding of contemporary innovation to theory.

Educational Aims

  • To examine innovation and assess the importance of innovation to individual businesses, a wider economy and society.

  • Analyzing case studies as an interactive means of investigating and learning;

  • Managing an independent study (elaborate ideas presented in lectures and discussed in workshops);

  • Working in small groups to undertake tutorial activities;

  • Undertaking deductive and inductive reasoning

Outline Syllabus

Example of topics covered:

Week 1: Introduction, definitions and what is innovation in product and service

Week 2: The diffusion and models of product and service innovation

Week 3: Contemporary theories on product and service innovation

Week 4: Presentations and the role of user-led design innovation

Week 5: Presentations and the dark side of innovation

Assessment Proportions

Individual Essay 100%

ENSI301: Essentials of Strategic Management

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas Term only
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Can not have previously completed a Strategic Management course

Course Description

Strategic Management is about making distinctive choices concerned with the direction and scope of the organisation over the long term in order to enhance its ability to create value and to improve its potential for survival and growth.

In a complex and turbulent environment, shaped by rapid economic, regulatory and technological changes, strategizing—the art of processing available information thoughtfully and creatively—is a critical skill to acquire. These skills affect the short-term financial health and long-term survival of any organisation.

The goal of this course is to provide you with an understanding of strategy, thus enabling you to discuss real life business activities within a framework of contemporary strategic management thinking. This course is designed to encourage you to develop a personal and distinctive understanding and appreciation of strategizing for different industries and in uncertain environments through lectures, case analyses, and class discussions.

Educational Aims

  • To develop an understanding of the major strategy concepts and frameworks, together with their respective strengths and limitations.
  • To develop the skills to identify key strategic issues, successfully applying appropriate strategy frameworks to the analysis of complex issues across different organisational contexts.
  • To develop the requisite presentation skills necessary to communicate the findings and recommendations from their analyses, and to defend those ideas and recommendations from the critique of others.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to strategy
  • Macro-environmental and industry-level analysis
  • Strategic positioning
  • Resources and capabilities
  • Corporate strategy
  • International strategy: Alliances, mergers and acquisitions
  • Stakeholders: Power and influence in strategy
  • Organisation culture and strategic change
  • Evaluating strategic options: Strategic choice
  • Revision: examination preparation.

Assessment Proportions

  • Exam: 70%
  • Coursework: 30%

ENSI302: Strategy Simulation Challenge

  • Terms Taught: Lent / Summer terms only
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: Must have completed a Strategic Management Course such as ENSI301  

Course Description

This module is a computer-based strategic management simulation that provides the opportunity to apply strategy concepts in practice.  Teams of students run their own regional airline for eight simulated quarters in direct competition with other student teams.  Each team takes over a small but growing airline with a mixed history of profitability.  You will devise strategy for your airline and implement and review this each quarter.  By the end of the term, the expectation is that each airline will be in a much healthier state. 

The module provides valuable team-based hands-on experience developing and implementing strategy for a small but growing business in a simulated environment.

Educational Aims

  • An understanding of how strategic principles can be put into practice in a dynamic competitive environment
  • An ability to evaluate the impact of strategy decisions on competitive rivalry and company performance
  • An understanding of the importance of the strategic alignment of activities, resources and capabilities
  • An understanding of the importance of the interaction between different functions in an organisation
  • An understanding of some of the challenges involved in strategic decision-making in organisations
  • The ability to communicate strategy and strategic decisions in a convincing manner
  • The development of interpersonal, analytical, presentation and report-writing skills as part of a team

Outline Syllabus

This module builds on and integrates learning from taught strategy modules in offering students the opportunity to put strategy theory into practice in a simulated environment.

Students are allocated to teams for the duration of the module and work independently for much of the time. Teams meet with their tutor at least four times over the duration of the module. The focus of tutor meetings is guided by particular team needs and tutor feedback, covering aspects of strategic decision making, company performance, team working, and preparation and production of materials for module assessment.

To support these activities, there are three two-hour lectures covering aspects of the simulation itself, key strategic decisions, the nature of teams and teamworking on the module, and module assessment.

Assessment Proportions

  • Group-based 60% (Company performance – simulation, 20%; Report and presentation,  40%)
  • Individual essay: 40% 

ENSI311: Franchising

  • Terms Taught: Lent / Summer Terms only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: ENSI207 (or equivalent) or 30 credits (16 ECTS credits for study abroad) of entrepreneurship courses at second year level or In special circumstances this course may be available to you following an interview with the course convenor.

Course Description

This course examines the components of franchise systems, focusing particularly on business format franchise networks. The perspectives of both franchisee and franchisor are considered, as are various management issues which may arise within the network. Teaching is by lectures and workshops.

Educational Aims

  • To develop a familiarity with current theory and research in franchising.
  • To develop an informed understanding of the role, structure and probable future of franchising in the global economy.
  • To develop an informed and critical understanding of the management issues and problems involved in thefoundation and development of a franchise network.
  • To critically evaluate current theory and research in the light of the aspects of practice described above.

Outline Syllabus

  • Introduction to Franchising: An introduction to the course structure, rationale, purpose and assessment. The nature of franchising will be explored and business format franchising introduced, explaining the importance of franchising to the economy, exploring its contribution at both the micro and macro level.
  • Theories of Franchising: This lecture will look at the historical development and coverage of the theories of franchising within the literature highlighting how these theories will be covered within the lectures.
  • Franchisees Motivations and the Decision Process: The lecture will look at the motivations and career intentions of individuals entering into franchising as well as providing a discussion on the decision process when choosing a franchise.
  • Key Management Issues in Franchising: A focus on the key issues that franchisors face in maintaining the franchise relationship. The franchise life-cycle, autonomy and control, and standardization versus adaptation will be discussed.
  • Conflict within Franchise Systems: An introduction to some of the conflicts that can occur in franchise systems and the possible ramifications they might have. The lecture will tackle the impact of conflict on the management of a franchised business, as well as how conflict can be dealt with by the franchisor. 
  • Example Franchise - Pierre Victoire: This lecture will further introduce managerial issues associated with running franchise organisations using the video example of Pierre Victoire.

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 50%
  • Group work: 50%

ENSI314: Family Business

  • Terms Taught: Michaelmas term only
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: ENSI207 (or equivalent) or 30 credits (16 ECTS credits for study abroad) of entrepreneurship courses at second year level or in special circumstances this course may be available to you following an interview with the course convenor.

Course Description

Family enterprises represent the majority of all companies and dominate the economic landscape around the world. They have unique strategic goals, governance structures and competitive resources. Sometimes, the distinctive traits of family enterprises correspond to unique strengths and competitive advantages, but they can also cause severe organizational dysfunctions that may ultimately lead to poor enterprise performance. What is more, only a marginal number of family enterprises survive generational transitions. How can family enterprises achieve a match between internal organizational capabilities and external environmental conditions that facilitates improved performance, potentially across generations?

This course will be of benefit to those students who are members of a family with established business interests, will likely find themselves working for a family-owned firm, and/or might be associated with such organizations in a professional capacity through such roles as consultant, accountant, lawyer, banker or even researcher.

Educational Aims

  • Appreciate and understand the role of families businesses worldwide
  • Understand the unique strategic and managerial challenges for family enterprises
  • Understand differing interpretations of family business, including managerial, economic, historical and sociological issues arising from the relationship between family and firm.
  • Understanding the longevity of family firms and how this is influenced by succession, innova-tion, entrepreneurship and trans-generational issues.

Outline Syllabus

This module provides students with theoretical frameworks and practical tools to build an enlightened understanding of how to work entrepreneurially and professionally, in and with family firms, and manage the unique challenges and dilemmas faced by family enterprises effectively. Topics covered include:

  • What is a family firm?
  • Circles, Stages, Theories and Models - Case Study
  • Goals and goal setting in family business
  • Governance in family firms
  • Designing effective family business governance
  • Power and succession in family business
  • Passing or extinguishing the torch
  • Managing family and business strategies
  • Options in family business strategy
  • Women in family firms: outstanding or invisible? Women Successors’ Dilemma
  • Managing innovation and technological change in family firms
  • Open innovation in family firms
  • Entrepreneurial activities through generations

Assessment Proportions

  • Essay: 40%
  • Exam: 60%

ENSI315: Social Contexts of Entrepreneurship

  • Terms Taught: Lent Term only.
  • US Credits: 4 semester credits
  • ECTS Credits: 8 ECTS
  • Pre-requisites: ENSI207 (or equivalent) or 30 credits (16 ECTS credits for study abroad) of entrepreneurship courses at second year level or in special circumstances this course may be available to you following an interview with the course convenor.

Course Description

We use an interactive student-led model of learning to explore the social context of entrepreneurship. The main focus is on contexts that combine social and commercial objectives, including social enterprises, co-operatives, social entrepreneurship and families in business. Your own interests are built on as you research an organisation and a conceptual issue that provide insights into entrepreneurship in a social context. The course provides a greater understanding of ethics and social responsibility. Critical-thinking skills are developed as we question preconceptions about social and commercial entrepreneurs and explore some of the theories that help to explain variations in behaviour and models of entrepreneurship. Issues such as the power and dominance of the enterprise discourse, performance measurement, tensions between objectives and mission drift are explored, alongside implications for policy makers.

Educational Aims

  • Critical understanding of the social significance of entrepreneurship.
  • Knowledge and understanding of the complexities of the many and varied forms of entrepreneurship.
  • Bringing theories from outside entrepreneurship and using them to explain social contexts of entrepreneurship.

Outline Syllabus

The module will be based on an interactive case study model of learning. Conceptual issues such as thepower and dominance of the enterprise discourse, theories of trust, responsibility, altruism, reciprocity and stewardship will be applied to practice, through the use of case studies. Lectures will explain relevant concepts and theories. The majority of contact time will be analysing case studies from a range of entrepreneurial contexts such as:

  • Sustainability
  • Crowdfunding
  • Social Enterprise
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Fairtrade
  • Community enterprise
  • Enterprise in deprived communities
  • Families in business

Assessment Proportions

  • Coursework: 60%
  • Group work: 40%