June 2013

The NHS fun tri

by Roisin Turner

Nine trainees from the first and second years have entered three teams in the NHS "fun" triathlon! It takes place on Sunday 14th July in and around Horwich, near Bolton. Each of us will either be swimming 400m, cycling 21k or running 5k, and we hope to raise as much as we can for the mental health charity Mind. We have set up a Just Giving webpage if you would like to sponsor us: www.justgiving.com/triclinpsy.

The NHS FUN TRI 2013

Hopefully the weather will be kind and we'll have a fun, if not exhausting day! Please feel free to come down on the day and give us a cheer - it'd be greatly appreciated! We'll be around from about 9am until early afternoon. Thank you for your support!

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Thesis presentation day & summer research seminar

by Sarah Heard

Most of our trainees from the 2010 cohort have now reached the important milestone of the submission of their thesis. On Monday 10th June the group shared their findings with a gathering of peers, staff and LUPIN members. The presentations were of a high standard and the research will be of great use to the profession. We look forward to seeing papers from these projects in press. The subject areas researched by the trainees were very varied; from 'Exploring creativity in people who experience extreme mood' to 'The narratives of life before and after cardiothoracic transplant'. Copies of the presentations will soon be available from the research webpages so watch this space!

We were very fortunate to be joined by Professor Bridget Jones from the University of Liverpool who delivered the summer research seminar on the day. Professor Jones is a distinguished researcher in the area of communication in clinical settings. The seminar explored the question 'What constitutes a supportive relationship in medical care? Lessons from a qualitative study of parents of children with cancer' and was well received by all.

The seminar concludes the DClinPsy 2012/13 seminar series; details for the 2013/14 will soon be circulated. For more information about the events organised by the research team please contact Sarah Heard; s.heard@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592754.

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Stakeholder's CPD Event Report

by Beverley Clack (Care Home Liaison Team, LCFT)

I recently attended the Stakeholder Event held at Forrest Hills and left the day feeling optimistic, energised and enthused. The day began with a 2 hour workshop entitled "Intelligent Kindness: Reforming the Culture of Healthcare" delivered by John Ballatt. John spoke about acts of kindness in the course of providing care, both in terms of being kind to service users as well as other members of our teams and broader services. The talk was engaging and firmly rooted in psychological theory yet it was discussion with colleagues about kindness - including to ourselves - that reminded me why I feel passionate about offering psychological input into services.

CPD with a view: Intelligent Kindess at Forrest Hills

Professionally, I am new to post for a team that has only just started - so everyone is new to team. Given the general backdrop of change in the NHS as well as in the narrower context of this new team, it was incredibly helpful to consider the psychological principles that both encourage and discourage team cohesiveness, resources and the ability to be kind.

In the afternoon, we heard all about how the programme is changing so that trainees can meet the shifting demands placed on clinical psychologists. I trained at Liverpool, so this was really helpful information. However, it was the opportunity to meet other psychologists that was most helpful. I left feeling more connected to others and certainly those working as lone psychologists in standalone services found that element helpful too. I'm looking forward to being more involved in future and enjoyed the day - thanks!

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The PhysCog Blog

by Ste Weatherhead

Technology and social media present as many opportunities as challenges. One of the great opportunities is the ability to connect individuals and communities, who may not interact as much as they would hope. As the curriculum develops, we continue to explore ways to connect stakeholders who have a shared interest in specific or general elements of the programme. Our wonderful I.T programme assistant (Rob Parker) is enabling us to explore new ways for us to do this. With this in mind, I would like to introduce: The PhysCog Blog

Each month the Physical Health & Cognitive Development strand team invites someone to compose a short blog, in which the author discusses an issue which is part of their current thinking relating to physical health and / or cognitive development. We hope that the blog will be written by a whole range of stakeholders, including clinicians, service users, and other interested parties.

Giles Yeates

The first PhysCog Blog is written by Giles Yeates. Giles is one of the new leading lights in neuropsychology. He is a clinician, author, and one of the good guys in life. We hope you enjoy his contribution.

If you are interested in writing 300-500 words on something that is engaging you right now, and which relates to physical health and / or cognitive development, please email s.weatherhead@lancaster.ac.uk for more info.

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'The Delusionals' 40 mile charity walk

by Rachael Faulkner

On Saturday 11th May 2013, first year trainees Kay Brewster, Rachael Ellis, Rachael Faulkner, Ailsa Lord, Liz Tallentire, Helen Walls and Marie Winterson, aka 'The Delusionals' embarked upon an epic 40 mile sponsored walk from Keswick to Barrow, collectively raising over £1000 (so far) in aid of The Alzheimer's Society and various local Cumbrian charities. Here is their tale...

The day started abruptly at 4am to the sound of synchronized alarm clocks. With our bellies still full from the feast of pasta and chocolate cake we devoured the night before (all in the name of carb loading), we hurriedly set about the task of preparing for the challenge ahead. A dash for the taxi and a short journey later, we were at the start point all bright eyed and eager to go, oh how delusional we really were! We set of just before 6am and filled with excitement and enthusiasm, the first few miles flew by. The 5 mile point came and we realised that having already walked an eighth of the way we only had to do that seven more times, easy we thought!

The light rain that had accompanied us for the first 5 miles soon turned to heavy rain, and with it out spirits and our socks started to dampen. The next 15 miles were nothing but cold, wet and miserable not to mention very steep in places. Yet on we pressed, looking forward to the 18 mile check point, one of the only places on route where we could meet with our support vehicle to stock up on sandwiches and have a change of clothing. We arrived at the check point to find a water logged field, with 4x4's being towed out by tractors. The check point was closed and apparently it was the worst weather that the organisers had seen in 47 years of running the event! Thankfully a kind steward took pity on us and eventually after waiting nearly an hour in the driving rain we were able to refuel and set off to face the second half of the journey.

Several jelly babies, sheep and silly games (think 'how many types of pasta can you name') later we reached the marathon 26 mile checkpoint and that 'second wind' came with a few miles of joyful respite from the rain. We only had to endure a 4 mile continuous incline up to the highest point of the route and it would be all down hill to the finish line. However, by this point the blisters had developed, the muscles were aching, the joints had started to seize and the weather picked up a notch with yet more rain followed by hail and bitter winds. The final 10 miles were turning out to be a real test of willpower and determination. Just when it felt like we couldn't walk another step we were greeted by a group of children gleefully cheering us on with their homemade banners. These children had been stood on the side of the road in the driving rain for the best part of 12 hours, and yet still their faces beamed with smiles as they shouted "you can do it, not far now!" This was just the boost we needed to pick us up and keep us going to the end.

15 hours after we set off, we eventually all managed to cross the finish line. Was it tough? Very. Was it enjoyable? Not at times! But we met some fantastic people along the way, and were blown away by the generosity and kindness of all those individuals that had given up their time to tend to our blisters, wrap us up in foil blankets and guide us on our way. It was also a great opportunity to get to know one another better and create shared memories that will remain with us throughout our time as trainees and beyond. Raising money for such a great cause in the process was truly the icing on the cake.

You can still sponsor 'The Delusionals' on this webpage!

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Interview Week 2013

by Anna Daiches

Was it really twelve months ago that we were segueing straight from the HCPC/BPS approval/accreditation process into our interview week? It feels strangely both further back in the dim and distant past and far too soon to have done the whole thing again - the interview week that is, not the whole HCPC/BPS visit. But it has happened - from the 21st to the 23rd of May a crack squad of stakeholders, LUPIN members, trainees and programme staff occupied the Lancaster House Hotel in order to put 68 hopeful applicants through their paces and identify those with the most potential to thrive in our training context.

Following a review of the 2012 process a number of changes were put in place for this year's event including the introduction of a new presentation question "how I developed the personal maturity and self-awareness to prepare me for clinical psychology training". Informal feedback from panel members suggests that this was a good tool for differentiating between candidates. For the third year running both clinical simulation tasks and problem solving dilemmas were used to afford candidates the opportunity to show panels their competencies as well as report them. The three days ran suspiciously smoothly, or as panel chair Ste Weatherhead stated "This year was particularly enjoyable, and slick in its organisation". We now have 24 confirmed acceptances and a brand new cohort ready to join us on September 2nd. A huge thank you to everyone involved in making this such a successful process.

We are currently in the process of gathering formal feedback from all applicants and those involved in selection, the results of this we will share in due course. We are also keen for anyone interested in being involved in future selection events to sign up for one of our training days which will be advertised in this newsletter later in the year. To sum up in the words of panel member Katy Flynn, "An excellent experience".

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Trainees through the looking glass: on the other side of interviews

by Caroline Wyatt & Liv Wadham

When offered the opportunity to be involved in the selections process this year, we immediately thought "wow, this will look great on our CVs!" Little did we know that we would learn so much both personally and professionally throughout the process. Firstly, we attended selections training and were introduced to the different elements of the process, and given the opportunity to practice some Oscar-winning performances from various tutors!

The interview day dawned and we probably felt more nervous than on our own interview day. This was due to the realisation that we were (partly) responsible for the candidate's future, as well as finding the next crop of incredible Lancaster trainees. Programme staff, clinicians, and LUPIN members supported us through flashbacks to our own interviews and we were made to feel valued as panel members. Our position as trainees provided a different perspective on the candidates, drawing on our own experiences through selection and while on the course. Our insight into where we were on our training journey at the point of interview helped us to realise that we weren't looking for the 'perfect' trainee, but somebody who could use the opportunities afforded by training. Our understanding of which qualities are valuable when managing the demands of the course helped us to formulate questions and reflect on this when discussing candidates.

Looking back to our interviews, we felt that the supportive nature of the process was at the heart of our decision to choose Lancaster. It was therefore important to us that we conveyed the same message to candidates. We realised that the interview process is a reciprocal one; while you are choosing trainees, they are also choosing you. We were impressed with the thoughtful answers and presentations given by candidates, and found that this stimulated a lot of our own thinking. Overall it left us wondering how we made it through the process, but very proud that we did!

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Advanced Supervisor Training Workshop: Attachment, Models of Supervision and the Supervisory Relationship

by Kirsten Smith

This free supervisory training day, run by Jenny Davies and Richard Slinger, will take place at the Conference Centre at Lancaster University between 9.30-4.30pm on Wednesday July 31st with lunch provided. A further date in August will also be run. The first two days of our Introductory Supervisor Training is in October with the final day in May 2014. For more details on these events, please contact Kirsten Smith, k.smith4@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592972.

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Publications

Trainees

Arran, N., Craufurd, D., & Simpson, J. (in press). Illness perceptions, Coping styles and psychological distress in adults with Huntingtonā€™s Disease. Psychology, Health & Medicine

Breckon, S., Smith, I., & Daiches, A. (2013). What makes offenders with an intellectual disability ready to engage with psychological therapy? A qualitative study. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 1408-1416.

Gill, I. J., Mullin, S., & Simpson, J. (in press). Diagnostic frameworks, quantitative research and clinical psychology: Some reflections. Clinical Psychology Forum

Morris, C., Simpson, J., & Beesley, F. (in press). Emotion and self-cutting: Narratives of service users referred to a personality disorder service. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

Morrison, A., Nick, N., Beck, R., Heffernan, S., Law, H., McCusker, M., & Bentall, R. (in press). Psychosocial and neuropsychiatric predictors of subjective recovery from psychosis. Psychiatry Research

Pouchly, C. (in press). Life story work - overcoming issues of consent and confidentiality. Quality in ageing and older adults

Watts, S., Murray, C., & Pilkington, A. (in press). Understanding and supporting psychological wellbeing: An exploration of the experiences of Islamic scholars. Mental Health, Religion & Culture

Walji, I., Simpson, J., & Weatherhead, S. (in press). Experiences of engaging in psychotherapeutic interventions for sexual offending behaviours: A meta-synthesis. Journal of Sexual Agression

Staff

Powell, P., Overton, P. G., & Simpson, J. (in press). The revolting self: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the experience of self-disgust in females with depressive symptoms. Journal of Clinical Psychology

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Coming Up...

Clinical Case Presentation Days
Date: Thursday 11th July & Monday 15th July 2013
Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
Location: Bowland North, Seminar Room 6 (Thurs) / Management School, Lecture Theatre 4 (Mon) - Lancaster University
Contact: Christina Pedder, c.pedder@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 593378

LUPIN Steering Group
Date: Thursday 25th July 2013
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Location: John Welch Room, University House - Lancaster University
Contact: Christina Pedder, c.pedder@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 593378

LUPIN Research
Date: Thursday 25th July 2013
Time: 13.00pm-14.00pm
Location: John Welch Room, University House - Lancaster University
Contact: Christina Pedder, c.pedder@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 593378

Advanced Supervisor Training Workshop: Attachment, Models of Supervision and the Supervisory Relationship
Date: Wednesday 31st July 2013
Time: 09:30pm - 16:30pm
Location: Conference Centre - Lancaster University
Contact: Kirsten Smith, k.smith4@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592972

Attachment, Models of Supervision and the Supervisory Relationship
Date: Wednesday 31st July 2013
Time: 09:30pm - 16:30pm
Location: Conference Centre - Lancaster University
Contact: Kirsten Smith, k.smith4@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592972

Introductory Supervisor Training (Days 1 & 2 of 3)
Date: Thursday 10th & Friday 11th October 2013
Time: TBC
Location: Forrest Hills, Hazelrigg Lane, Ellel, Lancashire, LA2 0PL
Contact: Kirsten Smith, k.smith4@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592972

Narrative Approaches to Neurological Conditions
Date: Monday 11th November 2013
Time: 09:30pm - 17:00pm
Location: Lancaster House Hotel Conference Centre, LA1 4YW
Contact: Sarah Heard, s.heard@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592754

Introductory Supervisor Training (Day 3 of 3)
Date: Wednesday 7th May 2014
Time: TBC
Location: Forrest Hills, Hazelrigg Lane, Ellel, Lancashire, LA2 0PL
Contact: Kirsten Smith, k.smith4@lancaster.ac.uk or 01524 592972

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