Flood and Coastal Risk Management

CIWEM accredited training for water and environmental industry practitioners.

As the UK recovers from the impact of flooding and coastal storms, following the wettest winter in almost 250 years, society is recognising the importance of understanding and managing risks to our environment in the face of increased frequency of extreme weather and climate change.

In partnership with JBA Consulting, a specialist water environment and flood risk management consultancy, we have developed flexible and accessible training for water and environmental practitioners focused on the application of technical skills and best practice techniques.

Flexible and accessible postgraduate training that works around you

  • Flexible delivery enables you to continue working whilst studying.
  • Gain technical skills and knowledge that can be directly applied to a wide range of roles and disciplines in the water, environment and flood risk management sector.
  • Start at any time throughout the year.
  • Delivered by practitioners who are experts in their field.
  • Leads to a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) with options to progress to a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MSc (180 credits).
  • Single core modules can also be taken as CPD.

Who is it for?

The course provides essential practical skills for practitioners and organisations including:

  • Local Authorities (in particular those with new flood risk management responsibilities).
  • Infrastructure, network utilities and asset owners.
  • The water and flood risk management industry and the private sector.
  • Catchment managers, Rivers Trusts and environmental NGOs.
  • National agencies such as the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, Environment Agency, Natural Resources Wales, Rivers Agency Northern Ireland and the Office of Public Works in Ireland.

Links with industry

The course material will be delivered in partnership with industry leading specialists at JBA Consulting who have extensive experience of delivering training and education, particularly to enable practical application in a professional context.

Applications for Graduate School for the Environment courses must go through the Lancaster University Postgraduate Applications portal.

Modules

The course is designed to be flexible and can be taken part-time over a maximum of five years.  Delivery can be tailored to individual needs to provide accessible training and allow the course to be taken whilst working. Delegates can choose from the following core and optional modules, each of which is worth 15 credits:

  • Catchment Hydrology and Assessment LEC.444

    This module brings together the latest methods and applied techniques in catchment hydrology and modelling.

    Key Information

    Course dates: November 2019
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1


    Course Overview

    It will provide delegates with a solid foundation in the key concepts in hydrology, hydrometrics and basic hydrological processes operating at a catchment scale.

    Teaching will focus on the practical application of skills and industry standard techniques in the context of the latest legislation, guidance and policy.

    Who should attend?

    The course is particularly relevant to design engineers, practitioners involved in flood risk management, highway and urban drainage designers, development control and consenting officers and catchment managers.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Apply industry standard flood estimation and modelling techniques to solve real problems in the context of flood risk management and the latest legislation and policy
    • Use hydrological data and be able to deal with uncertainty in a real world situation
    • Describe catchment characteristics and their implications for flood hydrology
    • Critically assess the main hydrological assessment and modelling techniques
    • Apply the FEH methodology to estimate flood risk
    • Deal with the absence of local data and know which estimation or modelling technique to choose

    Topics covered

    • Hydrological processes and catchment characteristics.
    • Hydrological data: collection, validation and manipulation.
    • Hydrological estimation:
      • statistical approaches to design flood estimation including an introduction to the Flood Estimation Handbook (FEH);
      • rainfall runoff modelling techniques, including time series modelling and design event models;
      • permeable catchment and reservoir flood estimation.
    • Managing hydrological studies, interpreting results, understanding and communicating uncertainty and communicating design flood estimates to the public.

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations including a new visual demonstration of the FEH Statistical Method. 
    • Hands-on exercises, worked examples and case studies.
    • Group discussions and a field trip to the River Conder.
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Maxine Zaidman BSc PhD CEnv MCIWEM C.WEM

    Maxine is a hydrologist with over 18 years’ experience in the water industry. Her specific areas of expertise include quantification of hydrological extremes, hydraulics, hydrometrics and groundwater-surface water interactions.

    Duncan Faulkner MSc DIC MA FCIWEM C.WEM CSci

    Duncan is a specialist in flood hydrology and has extensive experience both in research projects and a large number of consultancy studies. He has developed JBA’s and the Environment Agency training courses on flood estimation methods. He is a former member of the Flood Estimation Handbook research team and author of the Environment Agency’s Flood Estimation Guidelines.

  • River Hydraulics: Processes, Structures and Modelling LEC.445

    This module covers the key hydraulic processes, the impact of structures and provides an overview of the generic types of river model.

    Key Information

    Course dates: 31 Jan, 1 Feb and 13-15 Feb 2019
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1


    Course Overview

    Delegates will learn how to select the most appropriate model for a particular application for flood risk management (flood warning, flood risk mapping for spatial and emergency planning, broad scale screening studies, detailed feasibility and design of flood mitigation measures).

    Commercially available 1D, 2D and integrated models will be introduced, along with their data requirements, capabilities and applications including flood studies, sediment transport and tidal/coastal modelling. It will utilise case studies and involve hands-on modelling although no previous experience is required.

    Hydraulic principles relating to good river weir and culvert design will be demonstrated using a hydraulic flume.  Teaching will focus on the practical application of skills and industry standard techniques in the context of the latest legislation, guidance and policy.

    Who should attend?

    The course is particularly relevant to design engineers, practitioners involved in flood risk management, highway and urban drainage designers, development control and consenting officers and catchment managers.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Apply practical skills and techniques in flood risk management and modelling.
    • Apply the hydraulic principles and carry out basic calculations to inform river channel and culvert design in the context of flood risk management.
    • Critically evaluate the commercially available 1D, 2D and integrated models and select the best model for a specific application.
    • Identify and quantify where uncertainty exists in data and modelling and how it should be dealt with.

    Topics covered

    • Key hydraulic theory and practical analysis methods for river and floodplain flow and engineered structures, such as bridges, culverts and weirs.
    • An overview of different modelling methods (1D, 2D and 3D models) and guidance on their applicability in practice.
    • Overview of proprietary industry standard software.
    • Choosing a model and software package for a particular application, what can go wrong with models and model audit/ review.

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations and demonstrations, including the use of a mobile hydraulic flume to show the key hydraulic principles relating to good river weir and culvert design.
    • Hands-on exercises and modelling, worked examples and case studies.
    • Group discussions.
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Jeremy Benn FREng MA MSc FICE FCIWEM C.WEM MASCE MIEI CEng CEnv

    Jeremy is Executive Chairman of the JBA Group and has over 30 years’ water engineering, management and hydrology experience working in the UK and overseas. He has published and lectured widely on these subjects.

    He has been involved in the feasibility and detailed design of irrigation, drainage, flood walls, and storage reservoirs, ranging from culvert replacements to multi-million pound flood alleviation. He is the Visiting Professor in Flood Risk Management at Sheffield University.

    Jeremy has been involved with flood risk mapping (at national and local scales) since 1984 and is Framework Director for the Water & Environmental Management Framework for the Environment Agency in England. He has contributed to national Flood Risk Mapping technical groups in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, the USA and Vietnam. He has also been engaged to advise the Scottish Executive and the Office of Public Works in Ireland on options for flood risk mapping, flood forecasting and warning, and catchment flood management planning.

    Jeremy has particular interests in computational hydraulics and hydrological modelling and is an acknowledged expert on the assessment and management of scour risk to engineering structures.

    Neil Hunter BSc PhD MCIWEM C.WEM

    Neil is Head of Flood Modelling at JBA Consulting. Previously, he was a PhD student and then a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Bristol. His research focused on the development and evaluation of simple GIS-based approaches for rapid modelling floodplain inundation, with the emphasis on the assimilation of remotely sensed data from air- and satellite-borne systems for model parameterisation, calibration and validation.

    Since joining JBA, Neil has worked on flood mapping projects that have ranged in scale from site-specific risk analyses to national-scale flood mapping studies.

    As well as being a highly experienced modeller, Neil is also a presenter on JBA’s TUFLOW, ISIS-TUFLOW and JFlow+ courses and has contributed to a number of journal papers, text books and technical guides on hydraulic modelling, including the ‘WaPUG Integrated Urban Drainage Modelling Guide’ and the ‘Evaluation of Modelling Approaches for Urban Flood Risk Assessment’ evidence report for the Pitt Review.

  • Forecasting and Extreme Event Response LEC.447

    This module covers the latest hydrological and meteorological forecasting methods and the concepts and processes involved in flow forecasting.

    Key Information

    Course dates: January - February 2020
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1


    Course Overview

    It will introduce commercially available models for real time flood forecasting and warning systems and the concepts of variability, uncertainty and accuracy in short term forecasting.  Delegates will also be introduced to longer term climate prediction and the concepts and principals of uncertainty.

    The module will include a simulated flood response exercise to enable delegates to understand how forecasting is applied and how uncertainty and variability in forecasting is dealt with in a real world context and influences the decision making process.

    Who should attend?

    The module is aimed at a wide range of practitioners who are involved in flood risk management, community flood resilience, preparedness and response to flooding events, for example flood evacuation planning to accompany Flood Risk Assessments.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Apply industry standard modelling, forecasting and decision making techniques to address the risks associated with flooding and extreme events in the context of the latest legislation and policy
    • Critically asses commercially available models for real time flood forecasting and warning systems
    • Critically assess the different types of forecast and be able to select the most appropriate model for different applications
    • Understand how key agencies respond to extreme events in the UK

    Topics covered

    • Introduction to flood forecasting – the concepts, processes and components of flood forecasting (meteorological and hydrological) and concepts and principles of uncertainty in forecasting
    • Meteorological forecasting, rainfall run-off modelling concepts
    • Real time flood forecasting methods and models – methods, applications, interpretation of results and limitations
    • Emergency planning and response to extreme events

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations, exercises, worked examples and case studies.
    • Real time simulated emergency flood response exercise - this will utilise JBA’s Exercise Management System software which stimulates hydrometric data, displaying rainfall and river level information, automatic alarms, radar imagery and exercise injects to test response to realistic flooding scenarios.
    • Group discussions
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Professor Rob Lamb

    Rob Lamb is an Honorary Professor at the Lancaster Environment Centre and is Chief Scientist at JBA. He has 20 years’ experience of academic and applied research in stochastic and process-based hydrology, computational hydraulics, flood risk analysis and climate change assessment. Rob has been lead author for multi-disciplinary science projects for Defra and the Environment Agency, including Defra’s analysis of the Autumn 2000 floods.

    Rob’s recent research and development work has concentrated on pioneering the use of high performance GPU computing to accelerate hydraulic flow models, and developing a novel multivariate statistical method for assessing risks of extreme events in cases of spatial dependence, such as national scale catastrophic flooding.

    Rob is a visiting lecturer at Imperial College, London, Leeds University and Lancaster University. He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and books as well as a peer reviewer for international scientific journals and grant-awarding research councils. Rob recently co-authored two text books, “Practical Channel Hydraulics” and a new, 4th  edition of the well known “Hydrology in Practice”.

    Paul Wass BA MSc MBCS MCIWEM C.WEM

    Paul is a professional hydrologist and is JBA’s Head of Real Time Modelling, specialising in flood forecasting modelling, catchment simulation, flood warning and software development. Paul oversees all of JBA’s forecasting related work manages JBA’s Newcastle Office - the centre for excellence in the field of real time modelling. Since 2005, Paul has led or overseen more than fifty flood forecasting and flood warning projects. He is an expert model developer and in recent years, Paul has developed methods for testing the real time performance of models which have now been adopted in most Environment Agency Regions.

    At a national level, Paul is contributing to the development of a probabilistic forecasting capability in England and Wales through the Historical Forecast Performance Tool. Paul has built this role on a background of flood hydrology, model development, hydrometry and field science. He has particular experience of high flow rating curve development, as this is a key aspect of flood forecasting, and led the HiFlows-UK project for JBA.

  • Integrated Systems for Sustainable Surface Water Management LEC.446

    This module will provide students with an introduction to flood risk management in the context of UK policies, legislation and spatial planning.

    Key Information

    Course dates: May 2020
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1


    Course Overview

    It will provide a foundation in flood risk related responsibilities and assessment and introduce the key concepts in urban hydrology and sustainable drainage systems (SuDS).

    Practical application of SuDS in the context of the emerging guidance and legislation will be covered using case studies of SuDS implementation in a variety of situations. Delegates will learn about the design of SuDS systems, from outline design concepts to assessment of performance, estimation of flow and water quality loading.

    Who should attend?

    The module is particularly relevant to engineers and other specialists working in development control or the design of new infrastructure, consultants and developers involved with planning applications or flood risk/drainage impact assessments, flood management authorities and catchment managers seeking to implement sustainable water management practices. 

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Apply practical skills and techniques in surface water assessment and modelling to successfully manage flood risk and implement water sensitive urban design solutions.
    • Demonstrate the skills and knowledge required to undertake a Flood Risk Assessment.
    • Select and apply the best techniques and models for estimating design flows in urban drainage systems.
    • Efficiently plan, design, construct and manage SuDS schemes in accordance with the relevant legal and regulatory framework.

    Topics covered

    • Flood risk responsibilities (the Flood Risk Management hierarchy, Planning policy and guidance (in England), UK legislation and the adoption of SuDS infrastructure)
    • Flood Risk Assessment
    • Urban hydrology (Conceptual models of urban and rural runoff processes, urban drainage runoff estimation techniques and limitations)
    • Key concepts, features and performance of SuDS systems
    • Practical application of SuDS in context of the emerging guidance and legislation, designing and planning SuDS and obtaining consents
    • SuDS design, construction and management
    • Surface water management train infiltration devices, swales and filter strips, permeable surfaces, ponds, basins and wetlands
    • Hydraulic modelling for drainage and SuDS: key concepts, methods and principles
    • Introduction to industry standard modelling software (Micro drainage, MUSIC, InfoWorks) and how to interpret the outputs

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations, exercises, worked examples and case studies.
    • Field trip to a SuDS scheme.
    • Group discussions
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Rene Dobson BEng CEng MICE

    René is a chartered engineer with 22 years’ experience in the water and environmental engineering sector. He specialises in achieving sustainable flood risk management solutions and delivering river engineering and urban drainage projects from inception to detailed design and construction. Rene has published and presented papers on the application of SuDS for urban flood alleviation and habitat enhancement and has worked closely with SEPA on a number of challenging developments to maximise habitat enhancement potential and the social benefits of SUDS in the urban environment.

    He developed the first SuDS to be licensed under the Controlled Activities Regulations in Scotland and has designed fully soft engineered SuDS solutions in sensitive catchments. René has extensive experience in developing and implementing effective drainage management solutions for construction sites in environmentally sensitive areas such as SAC’s, SSSI’s and nature reserves.

    Jeremy Benn FREng MA MSc FICE FCIWEM C.WEM MASCE MIEI CEng CEnv

    Jeremy is Executive Chairman of the JBA Group and has over 30 years’ water engineering, management and hydrology experience working in the UK and overseas. He has published and lectured widely on these subjects.

    He has been involved in the feasibility and detailed design of irrigation, drainage, flood walls, and storage reservoirs, ranging from culvert replacements to multi-million pound flood alleviation. He is the Visiting Professor in Flood Risk Management at Sheffield University.

    Jeremy has been involved with flood risk mapping (at national and local scales) since 1984 and is Framework Director for the Water & Environmental Management Framework for the Environment Agency in England. He has contributed to national Flood Risk Mapping technical groups in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, the USA and Vietnam. He has also been engaged to advise the Scottish Executive and the Office of Public Works in Ireland on options for flood risk mapping, flood forecasting and warning, and catchment flood management planning.

    Jeremy has particular interests in computational hydraulics and hydrological modelling and is an acknowledged expert on the assessment and management of scour risk to engineering structures.

  • Sustainable Floodplain Management and Restoration LEC.449

    This module will introduce a geomorphological approach to sustainable floodplain management and river restoration.

    Key Information

    Course dates: 15-17 and 30-31 May 2019
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1


    Course Overview

    Based on case studies and examples of river restoration projects, the module will be delivered in the context of the developing legislative and policy drivers, eg. the Water Framework Directive (WFD).

    The module will cover the impact of land use and land management practices on rivers and how to incorporate flood risk management considerations into successful catchment and river restoration.

    It will also include a field trip to visit an example of a restored river system, demonstrating assessment techniques and providing case study material to support the design of a river restoration scheme as part of the assessment.

    Who should attend?

    The module is particularly relevant to catchment managers and practitioners requiring an understanding of geomorphology and hydromorphology and those who are seeking a more catchment-wide perspective for flood relief planning, WFD related compliance and strategic restoration studies.  

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate hydromorphology for a given river, working with current processes to predict and work with probable river response;
    • Apply a geomorphological approach to sustainable river management;
    • Assess the impact of sustainable river design and management on flood risk management;
    • List the key different river types and describe their impact on river dynamics;
    • Critically evaluate hydro-ecology and hydromorphology assessment and monitoring techniques, when they should be used and their strengths and weaknesses;
    • Design a sustainable river restoration scheme in the context of the latest policy and legislation and taking into account land use within the catchment.

    Topics covered

    • Introduction to hydromorphology and policy drives, role of the WFD, river typology and identification, UK and world river types.
    • River dynamics, flow and sediment, conceptual models of river and catchments.
    • Hydro-ecology and hydromorphology assessment techniques (including linked hydromorph-ecological auditing and assessment), applying hydromorphology to case study examples, hydromorphological indicators.
    • River restoration techniques (e.g. floodplain reconnection, deculverting, naturalisation, palaeo channel reconnections), land use and land management impacts on river systems.
    • River and flood plain management and flood risk assessment, the importance of monitoring.

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations, exercises, worked examples and case studies.
    • Field trip to a restored river system to get hands on experience of assessment techniques and approaches to river restoration design and delivery.
    • Group discussions
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Matthew Hemsworth BSc MSc FRGS MCIWEM C.WEM

    Matt is a Hydromorphologist and leads the Fluvial Geomorphology team at JBA. His specialist areas are in fluvial geomorphology and fluvial hydraulic and sediment modelling. Matt has developed numerous river restoration schemes throughout the UK and Ireland that work with natural processes to fulfil multiple local and WFD targets. He is an experienced trainer and has delivered bespoke training courses to the Environment Agency and other external parties for fluvial geomorphology/hydromorphology and hydraulic modelling.

    Kieran Sheehan BSc (Hons) MSc CEnv PGCE MCIEEM MIfL

    Kieran is a phytosociologist with an expertise in upland, grassland and wetland ecosystems. He is the Lead Ecologist at JBA. Kieran was Course Manager and taught on the University of Hull Wildlife and Countryside Conservation degree courses and is currently involved in research on the cultural landscape of the Humberhead Levels.

  • Coastal Erosion and Flood Risk Management LEC.448

    This module will provide a solid foundation in the processes that lead to coastal erosion and flood risk, including tides, storm surges and waves.

    Key Information

    Course dates: 14-16 and 29-30 November 2018
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: 30 hours (without coursework assessment component)
    Location: Lancaster Environment Centre, LEC3, Training Room 1/2 and Infolab C60


    Course Overview

    It will introduce estimation and computational techniques used to calculate extreme sea level and wave heights and for the production of tidalgraphs for flood inundation modelling. Delegates will also cover coastal asset management, design and planning considerations.

    The module will be delivered in the context of applying these technical approaches and concepts to decision making faced by coastal asset owners, planners, and developers. It will also introduce the concepts of predicting climate change impacts, uncertainty and how to incorporate these into flood risk management.

    Who should attend?

    The module is particularly relevant for coastal asset owners, planners, and developers. It will also be of interest to professionals and managers who wish to update their knowledge of extreme sea level science.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Apply different techniques to successfully understand and manage coastal risks relating to erosion and flooding.
    • Critically assess different numerical and physical models available for coastal flood modelling, their strengths and weaknesses.
    • Understand the theory behind common analytical calculations.
    • Understand, review and assess coastal processes reports, wave overtopping studies and coastal flooding studies.
    • Review extreme sea level and wave height estimates for present day and climate change scenarios.

    Topics covered

    • Key coastal processes: sea-level rise; astronomical tides; storm surges and waves.
    • Estimating extreme sea-level, estimating extreme wave heights and overtopping.
    • Wave overtopping estimation techniques (empirical methods, probabilistic methods, numerical models).
    • Numerical and physical modelling of coastal flooding (physical models, 2-Dimensional hydrodynamic models, 1D-2D hydrodynamic models, incorporation of wave overtopping).
    • Coastal erosion and sediment transport concepts.
    • Coastal asset risk management: interaction of coastal processes and structures and coastal asset deterioration and maintenance.

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations, exercises, worked examples and case studies.
    • Group discussions
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutors

    Dr Mark Lawless BSc MSc CSci CEnv MCIWEM C.WEM

    Mark leads JBA’s Coastal Flood Risk Management Team, and has extensive experience and expertise in oceanography, extreme sea level science, coastal flood modelling and coastal sea defences. He has published widely on coastal flood risk, extremes analysis and real-time marine forecasting in the UK and abroad.

    Dan Rodger BEnvSci MEng GradDipGIS

    Dan is a senior coastal engineer with JBA Consulting, specialising in coastal design and numerical modelling for large scale engineering, dredging, nourishment and coastal defence projects.

    Dan has eight eight years’ international experience in both private and public sectors; initially within Local Government in Australia where he managed dredging, beach nourishment and estuary/coastal management works, and later as an engineering consultant advising on coastal engineering works and numerical modelling. He currently leads a team at JBA undertaking detailed hydrodynamic, wave and sediment transport modelling and design of coastal structures.

  • Groundwater Resources and Protection LEC.466

    This module aims to provide an understanding of the principles of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, topical areas related to groundwater management and the approaches used for managing groundwater quantity and quality.

    Key Information

    Course dates: November - December 2018 (5 days of teaching)
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD: currently unavailable
    Location: Lancaster University, various lecture theatres


    Course Overview

    The practicals focus on applying computer models to solve realistic groundwater protection problems relevant to the water industry. A field visit is used to illustrate groundwater investigation techniques and support many concepts covered in lectures. The module concludes with a review of groundwater protection policies and procedures, supported by a guest lecturer presentation from the Environment Agency.

    Who should attend?

    The module is particularly relevant to engineers and other specialists working in catchment management and seeking to implement sustainable water management practices.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • List the methods that are widely used for investigating groundwater systems
    • List the main steps in conducting a pumping test for determination of aquifer formation constants
    • Apply a specific groundwater model (PWWIN) to a number of problems
    • State the limitations of models, such as PMWIN, for practical use
    • Determine values of subsurface flow parameters from experimental data
    • List a range of approaches for protecting and managing groundwater resources
    • Numerically evaluate model results
    • Prepare reports for a Head of Section as if working for an organisation such as the Environment Agency

    Topics covered

    • Groundwater fundamentals
    • Groundwater-surface water interactions
    • Well and Aquifer Testing
    • Groundwater transport
    • Managing groundwater resources.

    Delivery

    • Interactive presentations
    • Hands-on modelling exercises worked examples and case studies.
    • Group seminars and a field trip.
    • A comprehensive set of course notes and learning resources will be provided.

    Tutor

    Andrew Binley BSc PhD

    Professor of Hydrogeophysics, Andrew Binley, has 30 years research experience of working in groundwater science, with a particular specialism in numerical modelling, groundwater-surface water interaction, unsaturated flow and transport and groundwater investigation techniques, including geophysics.

  • Catchment Protection LEC.467

    Catchments are increasingly understood to be complex and highly interconnected systems. This presents significant challenges for those who manage catchments, but also a range of novel and timely research opportunities.

    Key Information

    Course dates: April 2019
    Credits: 15 (at Masters level)
    CPD:currently unavailable
    Location: Lancaster University (various locations) and Eden drainage basin


    Course Overview

    In this context, the module aims to provide students with understanding and practical experience of key research and management challenges facing the future management of catchments. The module will take the Eden catchment as a case study, and draw on the latest land and water management framework, derived from the Water Framework Directive, as a basis for discussion. After analysing this framework and identifying significant challenges, students will use a combination of field, laboratory and data analysis techniques to investigate research questions related to biophysical processes within catchments. These investigations will lead to an appreciation of the limits to current knowledge and the opportunities for future research..

    Who should attend?

    The module is particularly relevant to engineers and other specialists working in catchment management and seeking to implement sustainable water management practices.

    Course outcomes

    On completion of this course, delegates will be able to:

    • Analyse management frameworks relevant to sustainable water management, and identify and justify linked research and management challenges that emerge from these frameworks
    • Apply relevant field, laboratory and data analysis techniques to investigate these challenges, and describe the limitations and potential sources of error in these techniques
    • Critically appraise the current state of knowledge related to these challenges, and plan and justify future research activities to address gaps in knowledge

    Topics covered

    • The Water Framework Directive, River Basin Management, and the Eden catchment
    • Water resources management and river discharge gauging
    • Pollutant sources, pathways and impacts in receiving waters
    • Assessing morphological conditions in rivers
    • Links between land use and sustainable water management
    • Interaction with Environment Agency/Water Company/Rivers Trust staff.

    Delivery

    The module will be run as a series of linked project days.


    Tutor

    Ben Surridge BSc PhD

    Ben is a biogeochemist with 10 years of experience of research focused on phosphorus, nitrogen and carbon cycling in freshwater and soil ecosystems. He has worked extensively over the last 15 years with Defra, the Environment Agency, the UK water industry, Rivers Trusts, farmers and other catchment stakeholders on issues surrounding catchment science and management, specifically in the context of the Water Framework Directive.

  • Geoinformatics LEC.402 (optional)

Each module comprises five days of teaching that will be delivered at Lancaster Environment Centre in blocks of two or three days; the exceptions are optional module LEC.467 delivered over five contiguous days, and optional LEC.402 delivered over 10 weeks. Modules include seminars, workshops, practical demonstrations, case studies and/or site visits and is focused on the practical application of skills and techniques.

Background reading and learning resources will be provided to allow you to complete pre and post-course learning in your own time.

Levels of Study

Please get in touch with the Director of Studies, Dr Nick A Chappell if you would like to discuss any of these options in more detail.

Postgraduate Certificate

For a Postgraduate Certificate, delegates must achieve 60 credits by completing four of the core modules listed above.  The 2018/9 fee for each module (except LEC.505) is £1,040; you pay the fees for the modules you undertake in the specific academic year. The module fee is set each academic year. As an example, if all four modules were taken in 2018/9, the programme fee would be £4,160.

Postgraduate Diploma

For a Postgraduate Diploma, delegates must achieve 120 credits by completing eight of modules listed above. Choose two of the three optional modules. You may request to transfer your credits from the PgCert FCRM programme to the PgDip FCRM programme and add four additional modules. The 2018/9 fee for each module (except LEC.505) is £1,040; you pay the fees for the modules you undertake in the specific academic year. The module fee is set each academic year. As an example, if all eight modules were taken in 2018/9, the programme fee would be £8,320.

MSc

A new MSc Flood and Coastal Risk Management programme has been developed for 2017/8 entry. The programme comprises of six core modules and two optional modules (listed above) plus a 60-credit dissertation project (LEC.505). This project may be undertaken with your current employer in the water/environmental sector, with another organisation in the water sector or as part of one of Lancaster's research teams. You may request to transfer your credits from the PgCert/PgDip FCRM programme to the MSc FCRM programme and add the 60-credit dissertation project. The 2018/9 fee for the LEC.505 project is £2,827. Thus eight modules plus the project if all taken in 2018/9 as an example would be £11,147.

CPD (Continuing Professional Development)

We also offer LEC.444-449 modules individually as short courses without the assessment component. Our current CPD availability is shown on the website of the British Hydrological Society Short Courses section. The 2018/9 fee for each CPD module is £1,040.

Course Details

Assessment

The completion of a case study at the end of each module will enable you to apply the skills and techniques you have learnt and will form the majority of the assessment.

Qualifications

On successful completion of the modules that comprise your programme, you will be awarded (following the Annual Postgraduate Examination Board) a Lancaster University Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma or Masters in Flood and Coastal Risk Management, depending on the programme you choose.

Location

The majority of modules will be delivered at the Lancaster Environment Centre (primarily in our CPD Training Rooms) and where field trips are part of the course, transport will be provided.  Depending on demand, modules can be delivered nationwide.

For group bookings of individual modules for eight or more people the training location is entirely flexible, we can come to you or provide a training venue near to where you are based.

Entry requirements

We recognise prior learning and experience; there are no formal entry requirements and you don’t necessarily need a degree to apply.

Assessment and award of credits by Lancaster University

  • Lunch and refreshments during the teaching days and transport to and from field study sites.
  • All training material and resources, including online course materials.
  • Access to University facilities (library, support services and social spaces).