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Day | Week | Month | Year | Upcoming
Geology and Neutrinos. Speaker Prof. Terry Sloan, Lancaster University
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Frankland Coll. Room
Speaker
Prof. Terry Sloan, Lancaster University
Professor Machin is a fellow of the National Physics Laboratory (NPL), the UK's National Measurement Institute, which is a world-leading centre of excellence in developing and applying the most accurate measurement standards, science and technology available. In this talk he will give an overview of NPL's activities and discuss how the temperature standard, the Kelvin, is being implemented.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
Cavendish LT
Speaker
Prof. Graham Machin, National Physics Laboratory, UK
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Event Time
12:00hrs
Venue
Bowland North, Seminar Room 4
Speaker
David Wands, Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth
Dr Colin Forsyth from MSSL/UCL, title TBC.
Event Time
2pm-3pm
Venue
A18, Charles Carter
Speaker
Dr Colin Forsyth
TBC
Event Time
1345-1500
Venue
Cavendish Colloquium Room
Speaker
Dr Antonin Vecheret, Imperial College London
We are interested in charged species, which play an important role in both material science, natural product chemistry and biology. The lecture will present some selected examples. In ionic liquid crystals both self-assembly as well as thermal stability can be tailored by replacing spherical counterions (e.g. halide) with organic congruent counterions, which possesses a similar shape as compared to the liquid crystalline cation. Ionic interactions of neutral liquid crystalline crown ethers with metal clusters give access to phosphorescent hybrid materials, which are useful as oxygen sensors. Charged biomolecules in connective tissue determine water content, elasticity, tensile strength and cell adhesion. Inspired by these charge-driven interactions, we have designed novel hydrogels. Metal cations, such as calcium(II) are involved in both intra- and inter-cellular communication. Therefore, natural products (e.g. cylindramide), which are strongly binding to calcium(II), can be used as tools to control cell viability.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Prof. Dr Sabine Laschat, University of Stuttgart
Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique – microsphere nanoscopy – that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. In the talk I will review the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Dr Zengbo (James) Wang, Bangor University
Production Measurements of ψ(2S) and X(3872) (-> J/ψππ) at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector. Speaker Michael Beattie , Lancaster University
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Michael Beattie, Lancaster University
We develop a framework for modelling both non-volatile and volatile memristors by considering ionic/nanoparticle, electron, and heat degrees of freedom [1]. The model has successfully described both the resistive switching and noise spectrum in non-volatile Tantalum Oxide Memristors [2]. Also the model proposes a novel protocol of reliable operation of switching [1] and new regimes where memristors can exhibit volatile switching and negative differential resistance. [1] S.E. Savel'ev, F. Marchesoni, A.M. Bratkovsky Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 501 (2013). [2] W. Yi, S.E. Savel'ev, G. Medeiros-Ribeiro, F. Miao, M.-X. Zhang, J.J. Yang, A.M. Bratkovsky, R.S. Williams, Nature Communications 7, 11142 (2016)
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Prof. S Saveliev, Loughborough University
Neutrinos are the second most numerous type of particle in the Universe. These almost “invisible” particles are incredibly difficult to detect, passing freely through matter. However, as a result of a series of innovative large experiments in the last 20 years, we have learnt a great deal about neutrinos. For example, we now know that neutrinos have a mass, providing clear evidence for physics beyond the our current understanding. This achievement was recognized through the award of the 2015 Nobel prize for physics to the leaders of the SNO and Super-Kamiokande experiments. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is the next step in this decades long experimental programme. DUNE will address profound question in neutrino physics and particle astrophysics - it aims to do for neutrinos what the LHC did for the Higgs boson. DUNE consists of an intense neutrino beam fired a distance of 1300 km from Fermilab (near Chicago) to the 40,000 ton Liquid Argon DUNE detector, located deep underground in the Homestake mine in South Dakota. In this colloquium I will discuss why the mysterious neutrino may hold the key to understanding physics beyond the current Standard Model and describe how we intend to study neutrinos with unprecedented precision in the DUNE experiment.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
Cavendish LT
Speaker
Prof. Mark Thomson, Cambridge University
Dr Emma Woodfield from BAS will be talking about electron acceleration in radiation belts.
Event Time
2pm
Venue
A16, Charles Carter
Speaker
Dr Emma Woodfield, BAS
Measurement of the relative width difference of the B 0–B¯0 system with the ATLAS detector. Speaker Malcolm Skinner, Lancaster University
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Malcolm Skinner, Lancaster University
Trapping atoms in well-controlled engineered environments in optical lattices has proven to be a powerful tool for quantum-simulation of many-body quantum systems. Quantum-gas microscopes enable single-site resolution and single-atom control in these setups, which has made it possible to, e.g., perform in-situ measurements of temperature and entropy distributions, detect many-body entanglement, or to preparation spin-impurities and observe their ensuing dynamics. Aside from presenting an overview of the recent developments on cold atoms and quantum-gas microscopes, I will show our recent results on realizing single-site- and single-atom-resolved florescence imaging of fermionic potassium-40 atoms in such a setup using electromagnetically-induced-transparency cooling.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Prof. Stefan Kuhr, University of Strathclyde
Speaker Dr Oliver Schulz, Munich, Max Planck Inst.
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Dr Oliver Schulz, Munich, Max Planck Inst.
Speaker Dr Maury Goodman, Argonne Natianal Laboratory
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Furness LT 1
Speaker
Dr Maury Goodman, Argonne Natianal Laboratory
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Day | Week | Month | Year | Upcoming