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The redshift range z=1-3 (when the Universe was 3-7 Billion years old) corresponds to the era when the star formation density of the Universe peaked, and the time when most of the stars in today's massive galaxies were formed. Galaxies at these early times were drastically different from those locally, with massive, gas-rich galaxies undergoing rapid star formation in globally unstable disks, and the Hubble sequence not yet in place. To understand the physical processes driving the star formation, we need to spatially resolve the star formation and gas dynamics within the inter-stellar medium (ISM) of high-redshift galaxies on scales of individual star forming regions. In this talk, I will review the latest multi-wavelength observations which aim to measure the interaction between star formation and gas dynamics within the ISM of hundreds of high-redshift galaxies on scales that range from a few kilo-parsecs to just 100 parsecs. The goal of the observations is to constrain how the star formation assembled the bulk of the stellar mass in today's massive galaxies and how secular processes crystallised the Hubble sequence around z~1.
Event Time
1400 - 1500hrs
Venue
Bowland North SR 02
Speaker
Mark Swinbank (Durham University)
Detector Development for the ATLAS Upgrade
Event Time
13:45 - 14:45
Venue
Physics C36
Speaker
Dr. Daniel Muenstermann, Lancaster University
Abstract: Collisionless shock waves are ubiquitous in the universe and fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. The interplay between particles (ions and electrons) and fields (electromagnetic) introduces a variety of both physical and geometrical control parameters, such as Mach numbers. These vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics of shocks. Investigating astrophysical shocks (such as supernova remnants) has been restricted since the majority of studies have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. It is not clear what happens in the higher Mach number regime. Here we show the parameter space of bow shock crossings from 2007-2014 as observed by the Cassini spacecraft. We find that the Saturnian bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (Mach of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Our results demonstrate how the Mach number plays a central role in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly non-time stationarity and variability. We anticipate our comprehensive assessment to give deeper insight into high Mach number collisionless shocks and provide a broader scope for capturing the full picture of collisionless shocks.
Event Time
1400-1500
Venue
Physics C36
Speaker
Dr. Ali Sulaiman (University of Iowa)
Hear first hand about the experience of PhD students in Physics and talk to members of different research groups. Refreshments will be provided and everyone is welcome!
Event Time
13:00 - 14:00
Venue
LUMS LT10 (B floor)
One of our members of academic staff will talk about their experience of working in science, and how they have carved a successful career. Refreshments will be provided and everyone is welcome!
Event Time
13:00 - 14:00
Venue
LUMS LT10 (B floor)
Join us to meet Physics researchers and talk about whatever you're working on or would like to work on in the future, including summer/undergraduate research projects. Refreshments will be provided and everyone is welcome!
Event Time
13:00 - 14:00
Venue
C36, Physics
The NA62 experiment
Event Time
13:45 - 14:45
Venue
Physics C36
Speaker
Professor Cristina Lazzeroni, Birmingham University
<December 2016>
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Day | Week | Month | Year | Upcoming