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Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique – microsphere nanoscopy – that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. In the talk I will review the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Dr Zengbo (James) Wang, Bangor University
Production Measurements of ψ(2S) and X(3872) (-> J/ψππ) at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector. Speaker Michael Beattie , Lancaster University
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Michael Beattie, Lancaster University
We develop a framework for modelling both non-volatile and volatile memristors by considering ionic/nanoparticle, electron, and heat degrees of freedom [1]. The model has successfully described both the resistive switching and noise spectrum in non-volatile Tantalum Oxide Memristors [2]. Also the model proposes a novel protocol of reliable operation of switching [1] and new regimes where memristors can exhibit volatile switching and negative differential resistance. [1] S.E. Savel'ev, F. Marchesoni, A.M. Bratkovsky Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 501 (2013). [2] W. Yi, S.E. Savel'ev, G. Medeiros-Ribeiro, F. Miao, M.-X. Zhang, J.J. Yang, A.M. Bratkovsky, R.S. Williams, Nature Communications 7, 11142 (2016)
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Prof. S Saveliev, Loughborough University
Neutrinos are the second most numerous type of particle in the Universe. These almost “invisible” particles are incredibly difficult to detect, passing freely through matter. However, as a result of a series of innovative large experiments in the last 20 years, we have learnt a great deal about neutrinos. For example, we now know that neutrinos have a mass, providing clear evidence for physics beyond the our current understanding. This achievement was recognized through the award of the 2015 Nobel prize for physics to the leaders of the SNO and Super-Kamiokande experiments. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is the next step in this decades long experimental programme. DUNE will address profound question in neutrino physics and particle astrophysics - it aims to do for neutrinos what the LHC did for the Higgs boson. DUNE consists of an intense neutrino beam fired a distance of 1300 km from Fermilab (near Chicago) to the 40,000 ton Liquid Argon DUNE detector, located deep underground in the Homestake mine in South Dakota. In this colloquium I will discuss why the mysterious neutrino may hold the key to understanding physics beyond the current Standard Model and describe how we intend to study neutrinos with unprecedented precision in the DUNE experiment.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
Cavendish LT
Speaker
Prof. Mark Thomson, Cambridge University
Dr Emma Woodfield from BAS will be talking about electron acceleration in radiation belts.
Event Time
2pm
Venue
A16, Charles Carter
Speaker
Dr Emma Woodfield, BAS
Measurement of the relative width difference of the B 0–B¯0 system with the ATLAS detector. Speaker Malcolm Skinner, Lancaster University
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Malcolm Skinner, Lancaster University
Trapping atoms in well-controlled engineered environments in optical lattices has proven to be a powerful tool for quantum-simulation of many-body quantum systems. Quantum-gas microscopes enable single-site resolution and single-atom control in these setups, which has made it possible to, e.g., perform in-situ measurements of temperature and entropy distributions, detect many-body entanglement, or to preparation spin-impurities and observe their ensuing dynamics. Aside from presenting an overview of the recent developments on cold atoms and quantum-gas microscopes, I will show our recent results on realizing single-site- and single-atom-resolved florescence imaging of fermionic potassium-40 atoms in such a setup using electromagnetically-induced-transparency cooling.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
LT1, Furness
Speaker
Prof. Stefan Kuhr, University of Strathclyde
The advent of spacetime cloaking in 2011 opened a new paradigm in transformation optics in which the full spacetime covariance of Maxwell's equations was exploited to design, theoretically, a dynamic medium capable of concealing events. Shortly afterwards spacetime cloaks were demonstrated experimentally in systems that exploited dispersion in optical fibres. Somewhat ironically, dispersion was neglected in the original proposal of spacetime cloaking, and a theoretical apparatus that properly accounts for dispersion has only recently been established. I will describe the historical evolution towards the spacetime cloak, how it was demonstrated experimentally, and some of the new theoretical challenges in transformation optics it poses.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
Furness LT 1
Speaker
Prof. Martin McCall, Imperial College, London
In this colloquium, the members of the newly founded Observational Astrophysics group will introduce their research and themselves in a series of short presentations.
Event Time
3pm-4.30pm
Venue
Elizabeth Livingston LT
Speaker
Members of the Observational Astrophysics group
Speaker Dr Oliver Schulz, Munich, Max Planck Inst.
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Cavendish Coll. Room
Speaker
Dr Oliver Schulz, Munich, Max Planck Inst.
Speaker Dr Maury Goodman, Argonne Natianal Laboratory
Event Time
13:45-15:00
Venue
Furness LT 1
Speaker
Dr Maury Goodman, Argonne Natianal Laboratory
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Day | Week | Month | Year | Upcoming