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Sunday, 01 October 2017 - Tuesday, 31 October 2017

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For several decades, superfluid helium has provided an almost unparalleled frontier of quantum physics research, especially in topics related to macroscopic quantum phenomena: traditionally both superfluid helium-4 and helium-3 have provided a natural but versatile window to many-body quantum physics. In this presentation I show how the versatility of superfluid helium-3 translates into a variety of emergent phenomena, touching seemingly distant fields such as cosmology and high-energy physics. In our experiments we have used a rotating ultra-low-temperature refrigerator, the superfluid sample being cooled down by a nuclear demagnetization stage and probed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). One particularly useful NMR instrument can be constructed by trapping a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of magnon quasiparticles within the superfluid. We have used such condensates in probing a variety of delicate phenomena such as other spin wave modes, including Higgs modes, and Majorana bound states. We have also studied propagation of self-trapped Q-ball solitons formed of magnons. Q-balls, if observed in the Universe, could shed light on mysteries such as the dark matter. As perhaps the most publicized topic of this presentation, I explain how we discovered the elusive half-quantum vortices in superfluid helium-3. The very name of quantum physics refers to the observation that fundamental concepts such as energy and momentum are quantised in the microscopic world. Therefore finding vortices carrying only half-a-quantum of circulation — seemingly breaking that rule — is not only intriguing, but manifests deep understanding of the underlying physics and quantum physics in general.
Event Time
3pm-4pm
Venue
C36 Physics
Speaker
Dr. Samuli Autti, Lancaster University.
Space Physics Seminar: Earth (Global Resonances of the Magnetosphere)
Event Time
1400-1500
Venue
C36 Physics
Speaker
Jasmine Sandhu, UCL MSSL
Observational Astrophysics Seminar - The origin of OB-type runaway stars
Event Time
1500 - 1600hrs
Venue
County South C89
Speaker
Jonathan Smoker (European Southern Observatory)
One of the most exciting topics at the frontier of high energy particle physics and cosmology is understanding the nature of dark matter. Observing its production and measuring its properties in high-energy particle collisions is a topic of high priority at the Large Hadron Collider. Many searches have already been undertaken and are ongoing, but have not yet observed dark matter. I will discuss the motivations for a new approach to searching for such invisible phenomena at the LHC. I will present the first results of such a measurement from the ATLAS experiment, placing them in context with existing approaches, discuss their implications, and give my perspective on the future of this measurement programme.
Event Time
13:45 - 14:45
Venue
Physics C36
Speaker
Darren Price, Manchester
Over the last 5 decades quantum effects have transformed the field of metrology (the science of measurement). This process will culminate next year with the re-definition of the SI-system when all SI base units will be defined in terms of fundamental constants of nature. The UK Quantum Initiative aims to develop disruptive applications based on novel quantum effects which could open up a whole new industry sector for the UK. The challenge for the metrological community is to develop test and validation methods for these new technologies and establish confidence in them. I this talk I'll discuss examples from both these aspects of quantum technology.
Event Time
1500-1600hrs
Venue
George Fox LT 5
Speaker
JT Janssen, Research Director of the National Physics Laboratory
Abstract: Stripped-envelope supernovae (SE-SNe) are a subset of core-collapse supernovae where the progenitor star has experienced severe mass loss during its evolution. The resulting pre-explosion star contains little or no hydrogen or helium at the moment of core-collapse, and this is visible in its photometric and spectroscopic evolution. They are an important component in the evolution of their local galactic environment and are the primary source of neutron star/black hole binaries in the Universe. However, despite being first identified as a distinct category in the 1980s it is only now that we are beginning to be build samples of sufficient size to investigate the populations properties. In this talk I will present the results of analysis on the largest sample of SE-SNe to dates, which indicates that these SNe have considerable diversity across mass, kinetic energy, specific kinetic energy, luminosity, temporal characteristics, and host environment. These results will then be linked back to some of the key questions in the field; what kind of progenitors give rise to these events and what kind of evolutionary pathways are available? How is mass lost and is there an indication as to the time-scales involved? How do SE-SNe link with other CC-SNe, superluminous-SNe, gamma-ray bursts, and strong sources of gravitational waves?
Event Time
1500 - 1600hrs
Venue
C36 Physics
Speaker
Simon Prentice (Liverpool John Moores University)
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