Apply for a funded PhD position

We offer a range of PhDs funded by different sources, such as research councils, industries or charities. Here you will work with internationally respected academics, post-doctoral research associates and technicians.

To apply for a funded PhD, please read the advertised project information carefully as requirements will vary between funders. The project information will include information such as funding eligibility, application deadline dates and links to application forms. We will only consider applicants who have a relevant background and meet the funding criteria.

Browse our current PhD opportunities

  • Fully Funded PhD Studentship: Carbon foams and hydrogen from zero emission fossil fuels

    Supervisors: Dr Nuno Bimbo and Dr Richard Dawson, Engineering Department, and Prof Mark Shackleton, LUMS

     
    A four-year fully-funded PhD studentship for UK/EU citizens is available at the Leverhulme Doctoral Training Centre for Materials Social Futures to start in October 2020. The focus of the project is on the synthesis of carbon foams from zero-emission fossil fuels.

    Background: Recently, it was shown that hydrogen can be produced from methane using molten metals, which convert methane into hydrogen and carbon with no production of CO2. The method consists of using a molten metal alloy system, in which active catalysts such as Ni, Pt or Pd are dissolved in low-melting temperature metals such as In, Ga, Sn or Pb. It was shown that methane could reach a conversion as high as 95% at 1065 °C when using a Ni-Bi alloy, producing pure hydrogen and carbon. The produced carbon is insoluble in the liquid metal alloy and floats to the surface, making it easier to separate. This is an extremely exciting prospect, as it would allow the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels with no carbon dioxide emissions. To close the loop, the generated solid carbon could be used as a precursor to value-added commodities or materials and could displace carbon emissions resulting from those.

    Project: This PhD project will investigate the production of hydrogen using molten catalyst methods, focussing on the possible uses of the generated solid carbon, particularly the synthesis of carbon foams. Carbon foams are carbon materials with macropores connected in an open cell structure, usually synthesised from precursor resins or templated carbonisation of carbon precursors. Carbon foams have also been produced from compression of graphite or the assembly of graphene nanosheets. They have found many applications, including as electrodes or adsorbent materials, and their thermal properties have made them candidates for uses in thermal management applications, including in power electronics and as materials for heat exchangers. They have also been suggested as potential construction materials and were considered a good candidate for structural applications.

    The project will design a process for the manufacture of carbon foams obtained from the catalytic decomposition of fossil fuels (oils or gases), such that the hydrogen can be stored for later use and the carbon can be used as a precursor for carbon foam production. This will require investigating different catalyst alloys, designing separation methods that allow the removal of the solid carbon and investigating synthesis routes for carbon foams from the generated solid carbon. The project will also investigate ways of designing a process so that the waste heat from the exothermic catalytic process can be harvested for energy conversion or the synthesis of carbon foams.

    Person specification: The project would be ideally suited for a student with a background in physical sciences or engineering, especially in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics or Materials Science, with laboratory experience and with interests in clean and sustainable technologies. The supervisors for the project are Dr Nuno Bimbo (n.bimbo@lancaster.ac.uk) and Dr Richard Dawson (r.dawson@lancaster.ac.uk), both at Engineering, and Prof Mark Shackleton, at LUMS (m.shackleton). Informal enquiries about the project to the supervisors are more than welcome.  To apply, please complete the University's application form via the link below, submitting it together with a CV and motivation letter with the subject “Carbon foams PhD”.

    Application deadline and start date

    There is no current deadline for applications, so the position will be advertised until filled. The project is due to commence in October 2020.

    How to apply for the PhD Programme

    Lancaster University – ensuring equality of opportunity and celebrating diversity. Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system

  • Fully-funded PhD Studentship in Digital Process Iteration Human-robot for improving brazing safety and productivity NPL

    Institution: National Structural Integrity Research Centre (NSIRC)

    PhD Supervisor: Prof Andrew Kennedy, Dr Yingtao Tian, Nick Ludford/Stefano Tedeschi

    Application Deadline: Open throughout the year

    Funding Availability: Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

    Background

    Brazing is a well-established manufacturing process for a range of different safety critical components, however, a number steps are still operator dependent. Of particular criticality is the application of the brazing consumable, typically in a paste or wire form, which is used to form the joint. This requires the use of a skilled operator to correctly apply the consumable for each joint, which is a repetitive and time-consuming activity. The use process digitalisation to optimise the process and consumable application (creating greater production control) could result in significant improvements in process repeatability and robustness.

    Project Outline

    Many industrial manufacturing companies are driven by the desire for automation and smart manufacturing into the fourth industrial revolution – also referred to as Industry 4.0 – through automated and digital process cutting-edge technology such as the Industrial Internet of Things. Also, at the forefront of robotics is the idea of a robot capable of safe, collaborative working with operators to perform tasks across the process.

    This research aims to study and develop an algorithm for human-robot learning control for collaborative output tasks. Such human-robot learning control needs to satisfy two cases:

    • The desired output is directly available to the robot

    • The robot infers the desired output from the human-achieved output

    Therefore, the second challenge for this research is to develop a secure methodology to systematically digitalise a process that is typically very heavily operator dependent. It will be necessary to design robust, safe and secure hardware and software modules, which can be applied to the process to facilitate productivity improvements via the use of robotics. The overall objective is to develop an automated and repeatable digitalised process for the manufacture of safety critical components.

    Developing a framework around capturing process data, part geometry and handling requirements, securely transferring this data to a service platform (i.e. a Cloud), and then performing data analytics to correlate part performance will be required. This will enable manufacturing companies to minimise downtime, reduce human – process errors, and decrease maintenance costs. Implementation of the framework will result in a more competitive market by providing more efficient solutions to the customer.

    About Industrial Sponsor

    TWI is a world leading research and technology organisation. Over 800 staff give impartial technical support in welding, joining, materials science, structural integrity, NDT, surfacing and packaging. Services include generic research, confidential R&D, technical information, technology transfer, training and qualification.

    About NSIRC

    NSIRC is a state-of-the-art postgraduate engineering facility established and managed by structural integrity specialist TWI, working closely with lead academic partner Brunel University, top UK and International Universities and a number of leading industrial partners. NSIRC aims to deliver cutting edge research and highly qualified personnel to its key industrial partners.

    About University

    Lancaster University is a strong and dynamic university with a very highly regarded Engineering Department.  In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, 91% of research quality and 100% of impact was assessed as being internationally excellent and world leading. Lancaster’s approach to interdisciplinary collaboration means that it has pre-eminent capacity and capability for the integration of Engineering with expertise in the areas of data science, autonomous and learning systems, intelligent automation, materials science and cyber security. The University is developing an ambitious growth plan for Engineering, including investment in staff, doctoral students, equipment and a new building focussed on research themes including Digital and Advanced Manufacturing.  Lancaster is the current Times and Sunday Times University of the Year.

    Candidate Requirements

    Candidates should have a relevant degree at 2.1 minimum, or an equivalent overseas degree. Candidates with suitable work experience and strong capacity in numerical modelling and experimental skills are particularly welcome to apply. Overseas applicants should also submit IELTS results (minimum 6.5) if applicable.

    Tasks according to the type of project,  typically involve:

    • Knowledge and practical experience of computer operating systems, hardware and software
    • knowledge of engineering science and technology
    • analysing user requirements
    • writing and testing code, refining and rewriting it as necessary
    • writing systems to control the scheduling of jobs or to control the access allowed to users or remote systems
    • integrating existing software products and getting incompatible platforms to work together
    • maths knowledge
    • analytical thinking skills
    • design skills
    • the ability to work well with others
    • to be flexible and open to change
    • continually updating technical knowledge and skills by attending in-house and external courses, reading manuals and accessing new applications.

    Funding Notes

    This project is funded by Lancaster University, Lloyds Register Foundation and TWI.  The funding covers the cost of Home/EU fees and a standard tax-free RCUK stipend for three years.  Non-EU students are welcome to apply, and the funding will cover the cost of overseas fees and a limited stipend for three years. 

    How to apply

    For further information, please contact Dr Yingtao Tian (y.tian12@lancaster.ac.uk )

    Formal applications should be made via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal of Lancaster University.

  • Fully-funded PhD Studentship in Environmental Monitoring of Water for Radionuclides

    This PhD project concerns the design and development of a robust detection method for the real-time monitoring and determination of unwanted particles emitted from waterborne radionuclides as sometimes found in seawater and groundwater.

    This work is currently undertaken via the sending of samples to 3rd party labs for extraction and analysis – a costly and time-consuming method. This detector to be developed here will involve the development of a dual distributed solid scintillator comprised of both CaF2(Eu) and YAP:Ce to create a prototype system which can be utilised in real-life situations to determine the abundance of each radionuclide considered within the sampled water.

    This project involves challenges in areas such as the mechanical construction of the instrument itself, and some of the electronics needed to process the signals. However, we are interested in people of all scientific backgrounds as we feel there are challenges in the project that would suit a candidate from a wide range of disciplines.

    We welcome applications from graduates who have or expect to obtain, a good degree (first-class or upper second) in any relevant scientific discipline. This is a fully-funded opportunity for UK or EU candidates only and features an annual stipend of £15,009.

    Closing date

    There is no deadline for the submission of applications, but it is hoped that the successful candidate can start as soon as possible.

    Contact Us

    We very much welcome informal queries about this opportunity, which should be directed to Dr Stephen Monk or Dr David Cheneler. If interested in the position, please send a copy of your current CV to either Dr Monk or Dr Cheneler.

    How to apply

    Applications should be made via Lancaster University's online application system.

    Funding Notes

    Full funding is available to UK/EU nationals only for 3.5 years.

  • Fully funded PhD Studentship in Multiscale modelling for Materials Design in Additive Manufacturing

    A full PhD studentship on the multiscale modelling for materials design in Additive Manufacturing (AM). The project is led by Dr Wei Wen (Lecturer) and Professor Pedro Rivera at the Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, in collaboration with LPW. This research will focus on physics-based modelling and simulation adopting Crystal Plasticity to establish more comprehensive relationships between AM processes and the mechanical behaviour of metallic AM products. Simulation techniques at multiple length scales will be involved in this research. You will collaborate with colleagues at Lancaster University and LPW partners and will be actively involved in meetings, workshops and conferences.

    Project Synopsis

    Metallic powder bed additive manufacturing (AM) technique has become an active research topic in recent years; it has attracted increasing attention from several manufacturing industries such as aerospace, automotive and medical devices. There is a worldwide need for material design methods for AM to improve the quality of fabricated components. However, the AM industry is facing a key challenge since many factors may be involved in its processes – each of them may strongly affect product microstructure and properties. In such a scenario, addressing the Processing-Structure-Property-Performance (PSPP) relationships is deemed to be the pathway to optimise the chemical composition and fabrication processes to achieve the desired product.

    The Engineering department at Lancaster University has launched a research project in collaboration with LPW, aiming to enhance our current understanding of the PSPP relationships during AM and develop a predictive alloy design and process optimisation strategy. This PhD research will focus on the modelling side of the project. The candidate will be required to numerically analyse the effects of chemical composition, powder production and selective laser melting (SLM) processes on the microstructure of the material. Physics-based polycrystal models will also be established to bridge the microstructure with macroscopic behaviour. Advanced simulation techniques at lower scale would be performed to identify and quantify the relevant mechanisms. Thereafter, the student will be expected to create a comprehensive database of the PSPP relationships of the target materials and provide valuable feedback to the material design and AM process optimisation. All the modelling studies will be based on the outcomes of material testing and characterization provided by other members of the project at Lancaster University and LPW.

    Qualifications and experience

    • The minimum academic requirement for admission is an upper second class UK honours degree at the level of MSci, MEng, MPhys, MChem etc, or a lower second with a good Master's, (or overseas equivalents) in a relevant subject.

    • Background in thermokinetics and physical metallurgy is required.

    • Knowledge in crystal plasticity and dislocation theory is preferred.

    • A good basis in computer programming is essential for the post. 

    • Excellent oral and written communication skills with the ability to prepare presentations, reports and journal papers to the highest levels of quality.

    • Excellent interpersonal skill to work effectively in a multi-disciplinary project area of research.

    Closing date

    Applications can be submitted until the position is filled.

    Contact Us

    We very much welcome informal queries about this opportunity, which should be directed to Dr Wei Wen, Lecturer at the Department of Engineering, Lancaster University.

    How to apply

    Applications should be made with a covering letter and CV via Lancaster University's online application system.

    Funding Notes

    Full funding is available to UK/EU nationals only for 3.5 years; the rest of the candidates will have to find extra funding to cover the difference between UK/EU and overseas university fees. The student will receive a standard stipend of around £14.5k per year.

  • Fully-funded PhD Studentship in Digital design, additive manufacture, simulation and testing of multifunctional porous structures

    Supervisors: Prof Andrew Kennedy, Dr David Cheneler

    Start date: October 2019

    This innovative and challenging PhD project will develop and evaluate a simulation-based platform for the design and testing of multifunctional macroporous materials.

     

    Project detail

    For macroporous materials to become ubiquitous, their unique multifunctional properties (such as fluid flow control, sound absorption and heat transfer – combined with mechanical strength and energy absorption capability) need to be exploited. Tensions exist between the need for open structures for functional performance and “mass” for optimum load-bearing capacity.  Balancing this and optimising the structure (for example porosity, pore size and pore connectivity) is extremely challenging.

    This project will develop the tools to create a virtual environment in which to design and test porous structures.  The basis is the building of porous structures from adaptable mathematical representations of packed spheres (that can be compressed, dilated and eroded).  These virtual structures will then be converted into models for 3D printing (using unique high-resolution printers at Lancaster) and their design and the printing process optimised to ensure a good correlation between virtual structure and prototype.  Conventional FEA-based simulations of heat flow, fluid flow and mechanical deformation will be applied to virtual structures and physical testing of “3D” printed facsimiles will authenticate the accuracy of this modelling.

    Funding and eligibility

    The project is fully funded for 3.5 years and UK and EU citizens are eligible to apply.  The successful applicant will be paid a tax-free stipend of £15, 009 per year and will join an internationally recognised research group to deliver a novel solution to the design of porous materials.  The project will deliver original, fundamental research with wide scientific interest and impact.  The student will attain wide-ranging skills and expertise in programming, mathematical modelling, 3D design and manufacturing and mechanical and physical property testing.  The project would suit graduates with 1st or upper second class degrees in engineering, materials science, mathematics or physics.

    For further information please contact Prof Andrew Kennedy (a.kennedy3@lancaster.ac.uk) https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/engineering/about/people/andrew-kennedy

    How to apply

    Applications should be made via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your details, background and upload supporting documentation. The application should make clear that you are applying for this funded project and upload the project described above as the research proposal. Please do also mention the supervisors listed above.

    Lancaster University – ensuring equality of opportunity and celebrating diversity.

  • Fully-funded PhD Studentship (Sponsored by Lloyds Register Foundation) in Real time evaluation of weld quality during Friction Stir Welding (Industry 4.0)

    Background
    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining technique which is being used in a variety of industries worldwide. Applications include the manufacture of trains, space vehicles, aeroplanes and cars. While the application of FSW Technology continues to grow, real-time quality monitoring is needed for the automation of FSW. To date, very few significant contributions have been reported regarding in-process monitoring and adaptive control. Having an in-process real-time quality monitoring system would significantly increase process acceptability, data exchange and integration with other systems, as well as reduce the need for post-weld destructive and non-destructive testing.

    Approach
    FSW is a joining technique that relies on localised forging and extrusion of the material to be joined around a rotating tool. There are many variables which affect making a successful joint: process parameters, tool geometry and wear, machine stability, condition of the supply of the component, work holding etc.

    This project will investigate how these variables affect weld quality, sensors will be selected and installed on the FSW machine(s) and used to assess the FSW environment and through collection and analysis of data establish if the process is in control and (non-destructively) if a good weld is expected.

    Initially, this would be through analysis of high-frequency force and torque signals, however other signals such as sound, vibration, temperature etc. could be introduced.

    Deliverables
    The deliverables would be two-fold

    For industry

    • An open-loop non-destructive evaluation system which could be used to (a) monitor and qualify that the welds produced are to a standard or (b) detect unexpected occurrences such as tool breakage.

    • A closed-loop feedback system which could detect the onset of process breakdown and adapt the process parameters to re-establish good welding.

    For Research  

    • An analytical system which would guide engineers in developing and optimising FSW tool design and process parameters for specific welding applications reducing development lead times.

     

    About Industrial Sponsor
    The Lloyd’s Register Foundation funds the advancement of engineer-related education and research and supports work that enhances the safety of life at sea, on land and in the air, because life matters. Lloyd’s Register Foundation is partly funded by the profits of their trading arm Lloyd’s Register Group Limited, a global engineering, technical and business services organisation.

    About NSIRC
    NSIRC is a state-of-the-art postgraduate engineering facility established and managed by structural integrity specialist TWI, working closely with, top UK and International Universities and several leading industrial partners. NSIRC aims to deliver cutting edge research and highly qualified personnel to its key industrial partners.

    About the University
    Lancaster University is a strong and dynamic university with a very highly regarded Engineering Department.  In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, 91% of research quality and 100% of impact was assessed as being internationally excellent and world-leading. Lancaster’s approach to interdisciplinary collaboration means that it has the pre-eminent capacity and capability for the integration of Engineering with expertise in the areas of data science, autonomous and learning systems, intelligent automation, materials science and cybersecurity. The University is developing an ambitious growth plan for Engineering, including investment in staff, doctoral students, equipment and a new building focussed on research themes including Digital and Advanced Manufacturing.  Lancaster is the current Times and the Sunday Times University of the Year.

    Candidate Requirements
    Candidates should have a relevant degree at 2.1 minimum or an equivalent overseas degree in:

    • Engineering (Mechanical, Controls, Manufacturing)
    • Materials science
    • Physics

    Candidates with suitable work experience and strong capacity in numerical modelling and experimental skills are particularly welcome to apply. Overseas applicants should also submit IELTS results (minimum 6.5), if applicable.

    This collaborative project will involve the majority of the time spent at TWI in Cambridge, but there is an expectation that the Student will spend a proportion of their time at Lancaster University.

    Funding Notes
    This project is funded by Lloyds Register Foundation and TWI. The studentship will provide a successful Home/EU student with a stipend of £16k/year and will cover the cost of tuition fees. Non-EU students are also welcome to apply, and the studentship will provide a successful non-EU applicant with a maximum of £24k/year towards living costs and tuition fees at the overseas rate.

    How to apply
    For further information, please contact Dr Yingtao Tian (y.tian12@lancaster.ac.uk). Formal applications should be made via the Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your details, background and upload supporting documentation.

    Lancaster University – ensuring equality of opportunity and celebrating diversity.

  • PhD Studentship in Modelling and Design of Redox Flow Energy Storage Systems

    Details

    • Funding Type: Postgraduate Studentship
    • Type of Study: PhD 
    • Deadline for Applications: 30th June 2018

     

    Description

    Redox flow energy storage systems offer unique advantages over batteries and other devices because the charging and discharge processes are separated from the storage and even from each other. This flexibility in the design affords great opportunities for optimisation against a range of objectives such as, but not limited to, rapid opportunistic charging exploiting excess wind power to slow baseload charging exploiting low demand nighttime periods. The configuration of the process equipment in conjunction with the electrochemistry leads to complex non-linear dynamics. Also, start-up, shut-down and current reversal can impose chemical and physical stresses on components leading to excessive corrosion and failure.

    Working with the redox flow research team in Energy Lancaster the successful candidate will investigate and develop models to describe the electrochemical and flow processes at a range of scales from the molecular to the complete process system. The work will be informed by current empirical research in electrolyte systems being carried out by the group. It is envisaged that the outputs of this work will inform many aspects of redox flow energy storage systems from a selection of electrolytes and the design and novel fabrication of electrolysers through process systems to the integration of systems with complementary storage technologies and grids.

    Eligibility Criteria

    To be eligible for a studentship, the funding requirements are such that the candidate is either a UK citizen or an EU national. Applicants from outside UK/EU are welcome to apply, however, they will be required to demonstrate their ability to meet the difference between international and home tuition fees.

    Entry Requirements

    A first-class or good 2:1 degree (or equivalent) in chemical engineering or a cognate discipline. Experience with computational modelling in one or more of the following fields is essential: Fluid flow, Process systems, chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer.

    Applications

    Formal applications should be made via the Lancaster University Postgraduate Admissions Portal. Once you have created an account you will be able to fill in your details, background and upload supporting documentation. The application should make clear that you are applying for this funded project and upload the project described above as the research proposal.

    For further information, please contact Professor Alastair Martin (a.martin1@lancaster.ac.uk).

  • Fully Funded PhD Studentship: Advanced Control Systems for Intelligent Coordination of Manipulation and Grasping in Nuclear Robotics
    • Deadline 31st December 2018

    Supervisor

    Dr Allahyar Montazeri

    Description

    A fully-funded PhD studentship is available for an outstanding graduate with specific interest on robotics, control as well as image processing techniques. The project is in close collaboration with the industry partner to develop a novel advanced control system for intelligent coordination of hand and eye in a hydraulic nuclear manipulator. The main objective is to develop a system that addresses the inherent uncertainty in the nuclear industry case study environments for applications such as welding, pipe cutting and material discrimination. Engineering research at Lancaster University has been rated as world-leading in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) and you will join a dedicated team of scientists working on a range of exciting topics in robotics.

    Increasing the autonomy of nuclear robots is one of the key factors to improve decommissioning performance and reduce the dependency of the remotely controlled system by the human operator. This is due to the complex manipulation capabilities that require the robot to interact with objects and environment forcefully by pushing, cutting, shearing, grinding in addition to easier pick-and-place tasks.

    In this project, we address the above-mentioned challenges by design and development an advanced control system which combines the information from the smart end-effector tool with the control system designed for the manipulator for a coordinated and intelligent grasping and manipulation.

    The system that will be developed in this research consists of two major subsystems. The end-effector subsystem which includes the hardware and algorithms designed to recognise the material of the object aimed for grasping and the manipulation subsystem which consists of a vision system combined with a novel multivariable control system resulting in a high precision visual-serving system.

    Although the size and shape of the object are identified by the camera in the manipulator subsystem, the material is recognized through the end-effector subsystem. The approach here is to propose a multi-modal sensing system by using various sensors in the end-effector tool. It is envisaged to achieve a fast and accurate classification rate for a range of materials by fusing these measurements using iterative machine learning algorithms. Combining this information with the vision system in the manipulation subsystem generates the desired force for interaction with the object. Furthermore, the vision system is used to identify the position of the end-effector and move the arm towards the object. This is carried out by further investigating the advanced control system developed for this purpose to improve its performance and combine it with the visual information provided by the camera in real-time.

    Application Details

    Potential candidates for this position are expected to have the following qualifications:

    • Should have or expect to achieve a first-class or upper second-class degree in Engineering at the level of MSc, MEng, etc or a lower second with a good Master's, (or overseas equivalents) in a relevant subject.

    • The funding is available for UK/EU students; however, international students could also apply under circumstances.

    • Sufficient background on control theory, image processing or a closely related discipline.

    • Practical experiences on the implementation of the control algorithms.

    • Computer programming skills such as MATLAB are essential for the post.

    • You should have excellent interpersonal skills, work effectively in a team and have experience of the preparation of presentations, reports or journal papers to the highest levels of quality.

    • The suitable candidate should also have been resident in the UK for at least 4 years immediately before taking up the position.

    Eligibility Criteria

    A full standard studentship consists of tuition fees, together with a maintenance grant and research training support. The funding is for 3.5 years and will pay a stipend that is £2K above the standard UKRC rate.

    To declare your interest and get further information about the application procedure, please send a copy of your CV along with the cover letter to Dr Allahyar Montazeri.

    The formal application should be made via the Lancaster University online portal once it is reviewed and considered for the position.

  • Fully funded PhD Studentship in Terahertz imaging for spectroscopic applications

    The Department of Engineering at Lancaster University is pleased to announce the availability of a fully-funded PhD studentship in Electronic Engineering, to commence in October 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter.

    The Terahertz (THz) range (1-10 THz corresponds to vacuum wavelengths between 30-300 m) represents an exciting portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with unique applications in communications, spectroscopy and imaging. THz imaging has an enormous potential in both fundamental research and industrial applications [1], such as pharmaceutical quality control [2], materials characterisation [3] and biomedical imaging [4]. However, one of the bottlenecks has been the need for raster scanning as part of THz imaging acquisition.  Exploiting the compactness of metamaterials and the electrical tunability of graphene [7, 8], this project will combine computational imaging with graphene integrated metamaterials to enable real-time THz imaging. This project will involve the design, simulation, fabrication and testing of spatial light modulators and detectors based on metamaterials and graphene, operating in the terahertz frequency range and their application in solid-state spectroscopy and imaging. Graphene samples and expertise will be provided by the established collaboration with the University of Cambridge. The PhD candidate will develop expertise in device fabrication using standard clean room techniques, as well as proficiency in device characterisation using facilities available in the Engineering Department.

    [1] “Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging”, edited by K.-E. Peiponen, J. A. Zeitler, M. Kuwata-Gonokami, Springer-Verlag

    Berlin Heidelberg (2013).

    [2] Y.-C. Shen et al. “Development and application of terahertz pulsed imaging for non-destructive inspection of a pharmaceutical tablet,” IEEE J. Sel. Topics in Quantum Electron. 14(2), 407–415, (2008).

    [3] H Lin, et al. “Contactless graphene conductivity mapping on a wide range of substrates with terahertz time-domain reflection spectroscopy,” Sci. Rep. 7 (1), 10625, (2017).

    [4] E. Pickwell et al. “Biomedical Applications of Terahertz Technology,” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 (17), 301−310, (2006).

    [5] C. M Watts et al. “Terahertz compressive imaging with metamaterial spatial light modulators,” Nat. Photon. 8, 605-609 (2014).

    [6] W. L. Chan et al. “A single-pixel terahertz imaging system based on compressed sensing,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 121105, (2008).

    [7]R. Degl’Innocenti et al. “All-integrated terahertz modulators” invited review article, Nanophotonics, 7(1) 127-144, (2018)

    [8] R. Degl'Innocenti et al. “Fast room-temperature detection of terahertz quantum cascade lasers with graphene loaded bow-tie plasmonic antenna arrays” ACS Photon. 3, 1747, (2016).

    To be eligible for the studentship, the funding requirements are that you must either be a U.K. citizen or a European Union national.  The stipend for eligible students is £15,009 for 2019/2020 and subject to national adjustments. 

    For more information contact: Dr Riccardo Degl’Innocenti (r.deglinnocenti@lancaster.ac.uk) or Dr Hungyen Lin (h.lin2@lancaster.ac.uk).
    http://www.engineering.lancs.ac.uk/

    The formal application should be made via the Lancaster University online portal once it is reviewed and considered for the position.

How to apply

Step 1

To register your interest in a PhD opportunity, please email the relevant project supervisor with your contact details and a comprehensive CV. Please also include a covering letter, if requested in the advert details.

Step 2

The project supervisor will contact you and may invite you to hold a Skype or telephone interview. At this stage, you can apply for more than one advertised project if you wish.

Step 3

If you are successful at interview for the studentship, you will be invited to apply via the admissions portal online. This will ensure that you receive a formal offer of admission. Please submit one application only, and state the studentship that you have applied for in the source of funding section.

Step 4

Once we have made a formal offer, you will need to check the conditions in your offer letter and supply any outstanding documents by the required deadlines. If your offer is unconditional, then this will not apply to you.