Chemistry at Lancaster University

Chemistry PhD

Studying for a research degree is a highly rewarding and challenging process. You'll work to become a leading expert in your topic area with regular contact and close individual supervision with your supervisor.

You should feel free to contact us with any enquiries about our research, and about the possibility of undertaking a research degree here in Lancaster. If you have a particular project in mind, please feel free to contact directly the appropriate member of staff. Our research is broadly structured into three core discipline themes. Each theme is populated with an expanding team of research-active staff at the forefront of research in their respective fields. Our interests span many areas of both fundamental and technological interest. Perhaps most importantly, we share not only common ground in research excellence, but an inclusive and collaborative spirit, and a dedication to passing on our knowledge to a new generation of researchers.

Self-funded applications

To begin the process you will need to find a PhD Supervisor whose research interests align with your own. You will need to contact them to discuss your application.

Applications for funded PhD positions

We offer PhDs funded by a number of different sources including research councils, industry and charities.

We will require a research proposal on the area/s you are interested in joining us to study. This will be used to help us determine who will be the most suitable potential academic supervisor for your research. 

This is the starting point to find a suitable supervisor who will then if interested contact the applicant for a phone interview to discuss the proposal and intended research, meaning your proposal is not your permanent topic for your PhD studies and open to negotiation. Past guidelines have suggested the following:

  • a section that defines and characterises your selected research area;
  • a section that briefly surveys and sums up the state of the art in this area;
  • a section that identifies deficiencies in the state of the art which you would like to address in your PhD;
  • a section that outlines some possible research directions that you might pursue;
  • a list of references that you cite in the above sections.

We recommend applicants submit their research interests and the PhD Admissions Tutor can pass their application onto the most relevant and available potential supervisor. However, If you would like to search for a suitable academic supervisor(to quote in your application) then you can find a list of our academics here.

To submit an application, simply create an account on the My Applications website and then select ‘Create a new application’ from your homepage once you are logged-in.

Using your account on the My Applications website, you are able to submit applications for the programme(s) which you wish to study, upload supporting documentation and provide us with information about referees. You may apply for all our postgraduate programmes using this method.

Current Lancaster Students

If you are a current Lancaster student, or you have recently graduated from Lancaster, we can reduce the amount of information that you will need to provide as part of your application. You will need to provide only one reference and will not need to supply your Lancaster degree transcript. We will also pre-fill your personal details, ready for you to check.

If you use the My Applications website then you will be advised which documentation you need to upload or send to us. We can automatically contact your referees once you have submitted your application if you ask us to.

The supporting documentation screen will provide you with a list of required documents. These will usually include:

  • Degree certificates and transcripts of previous higher education (college/university) degrees or other courses that you have completed/for which you are currently studying.
    For transcripts in languages other than English, a certified English translation will be required.
  • A personal statement to help us understand why you wish to study your chosen degree.
  • You also need to complete a research proposal which should include the following:
    • the research area you are interested in
    • the research question(s) you are specifically interested in
    • who within the Department appears best qualified to supervise you
    • the methods you envisage using in your studies
    • plus any other information which may be relevant
  • Two references
  • If English is not your first language, we require copies of English language test results.

You can apply at any time of the year for PhD study, but we encourage you to start at one of the predefined start dates of October, January or April. In some circumstances, July start date will be considered. An MSc by Research will usually start in October. If you wish to be considered for funding, are applying form overseas or require on-campus accommodation, we recommend you apply as early as possible.

PhD Supervisors and Research Areas

Expand the list below to find our current PhD Supervisors, or visit our research groups' webpages to find out more about their work. Our chemistry research is divided into three themes. Each theme is led by a team of research-active staff, at the forefront of their fields.

PhD Supervisors

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We couldn't find anybody that matched your criteria

I have a range of available projects in Raman spectroscopy for biomolecular characterisation and single cell Raman microspectroscopy, although funding is currently not available. I welcome applications from self-funded students or from students seeking external funding.Training will be provided in Raman Spectroscopy, computational methods for analysis and chemical biology.

View Lorna's profile

Potential projects are focussed on synthetic organic photochemistry:
- New Synthetic Routes to Stereodefined Four-Membered Heterocycles
- New Synthetic Routes to Cubane Derivatives: Opportunities in Drug Discovery
- Metal-Catalysed Enantioselective [2+2] Photocycloadditions

View Susannah's profile

We have a range of projects, although funding is currently not available. We welcome applications from self-funded students or from students seeking external funding. Training will be provided in Time Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy, and Lifetime Imaging using Confocal Microscopy for the application in light harvesting structures.

View Lefteris's profile

I am looking to recruit postgraduate students keen to work on synthetic supramolecular chemistry research projects.

Funded studentships will be advertised on the Lancaster Chemistry webpages when they are available.

Prospective students with their own funding for postgraduate research should email me directly.

View Nicholas's profile

Any students with their own funding would be encouraged to apply

View Nick's profile

PhD projects include synthetic organic chemistry, catalysis and organometallic chemistry. Projects will be advertised as they become available.

View Vilius's profile

There are always research opportunities in our group, although funding is currently not available. We have both fundamental and applied projects available, and welcome applications from self-funded students or from students seeking external funding. We will provide training in all relevant aspects of computational chemistry and subsequent analysis.

View Andrew's profile

We have a range of projects, although funding is currently not available. We welcome applications from self-funded students or from students seeking external funding. Training will be provided in NMR spectroscopy, computational methods for analysis and molecular biology techniques for the production of proteins.

View David's profile

To learn more about research opportunities contact Nuria at n.tapiaruiz@lancaster.ac.uk.

View Nuria's profile

Electrochemical energy storage and conversion -

  • New chemistries in flow batteries
  • Physical characterisation of flow battery processes
  • Electrocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction
  • Analytical electrochemistry

Applications are always welcome from MRes and PhD candidates, domestic and international, with their own funding. There is also opportunity to collaboratively apply for funding based on mutual interest. Please contact me!

Lancaster University boasts an a brand new and well provisioned multimillion pound Chemistry Department. It is also well supported by outstanding research facilities in Engineering, Physics, Environmental Science to name a few. Energy research is a particular focal point at Lancaster University with Energy Lancaster championing interdisciplinary research campus wide. This is an exciting time to become involved at Lancaster University, with vibrant, fresh and exciting research ideas central to our emerging chemistry portfolio. Visit our departmental website for more details http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/chemistry

View Kathryn's profile

Current Opportunities

Funded Opportunities

Details of our funded PhD studentships are given below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the prospective supervisor before making an application. Chemistry graduates can also register for a funded industry-focused PhD with a £15,000 stipend.

  • PhD Studentship in Energy Storage Materials

    A fully funded 3.5-year PhD studentship in the area of energy storage materials is available in the group of Dr Nuria Tapia-Ruiz at the Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, commencing in October 2019.

    The research in our group focuses on understanding fundamental physical and chemical of energy storage materials, with emphasis on metal-ion batteries (Li-ion, Na-ion, K-ion and Zn-ion), to improve their electrochemical performance.

    Project description

    The increasing demand for powerful consumer electronics and stationary storage has driven the development of evermore high-energy density batteries. Among the next generation of batteries, safe and high-energy density batteries based on a solid approach, appear to be the most appealing system. Solid-state batteries (SSBs) offer the advantage of safety when compared to conventional batteries due to the replacement of the flammable organic electrolyte by a stable solid electrolyte. Hybrid solid electrolytes (HSEs) combine synergistically positive aspects of both types of solid electrolytes; these electrolytes will have high ionic conductivity and good interfacial and mechanical properties, as well as fine thermal and electrochemical stabilities and safety.

    The PhD student will identify design and characterise the best combinations of ceramics, polymers and additives to produce hybrid solid electrolytes (HSEs) for sodium-ion solid-state batteries (SSBs) that will lead to excellent stability, high conductivity and mechanically robustness. The PhD student will synthesise and characterise a series of HSEs based on Oxide-type and Sulfide-type ceramics and PEO polymers.

    During the course of this project, you will be trained in core practical techniques in synthesis, characterization and electrochemical testing, and will have the opportunity to further your knowledge through regular group meetings and seminars. You will have access to brand new facilities and equipment, including a brand-new chemistry laboratory with cutting-edge battery equipment and departmental facilities such as an NMR suite, X-ray suite, AFM and others.

    Requirements

    Applicants will hold, or expect to receive, a 1st class or 2:1 UK Masters-level or BSc degree (or equivalent) in Chemistry and practical skills commensurate with the undergraduate degree programme. The successful candidate will demonstrate a strong interest in energy storage, enthusiasm to work in a laboratory environment, willingness to learn, a collaborative attitude, and will possess excellent written and oral communication skills.

    How to apply

    We encourage informal e-mail enquiries before submitting an application to Dr Nuria Tapia-Ruiz. Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system. Applications will be considered in the order that they are received, and the position may be filled when a suitable candidate has been identified. Please indicate on your application that you are applying for this funded PhD project.

    About Lancaster University

    The Chemistry Department at Lancaster University provides a research environment that strongly supports the individual needs of each student, and promotes a healthy work-life balance. We are committed to the Athena Swan Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice undertaken to address gender equality in higher education and research. Our commitment to these principles is reflected in our recent receipt of an Athena Swan Bronze Award. The Chemistry Department also operates an informal PhD peer-peer mentor scheme available to all students. 

    Funding notes

    The studentships will cover fees at the UK/EU rate plus the standard maintenance stipend (£14,777 for 2018/19).

  • PhD Studentship in New Methods for Antibody-Drug Conjugation Professor Joe Sweeney, Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University

    A fully funded 3.5-year PhD studentship in the area of antibody-drug conjugation chemistry is available, to be carried out in the group of Professor Joe Sweeney at the Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, and in collaboration with AbbVie, Inc. (USA). The post will commence in October 2019.

    Background

    The Sweeney group has an international reputation for synthetic methodology, heterocyclic chemistry and catalysis (representative publications: iScience 2018, 9, 328–336; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 10202–10206; Nature Chem. 2017, 9, 396–401; J. Am. Chem. Soc.  2008, 130, 6840-6847; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 1066-1067), with a new recent focus on the application of novel synthetic methodology to medicinal chemistry (see, for instance: ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2018, 9, 552–556).

    Project description

    Antibody-Drug Conjugation (the covalent attachment of a known drug substance to an antibody) is a modern paradigm in medicine, offering the prospect of more effective and highly selective treatments for a range of hard-to-treat illnesses. Though several such antibody-drug conjugates ('ADCs') pharmaceuticals are already sold (including Adcetris, Kadcyla, T-DM1, and Inotuzumab ozogamicin), the chemical methods for conjugation are often not fit-for-purpose, with in vivo detachment of the drug 'payload' (leading to inactivation of the medication) a serious ongoing clinical problem.

    The aim of this PhD project is to develop new methods for antibody-drug conjugation which will enable the efficient preparation of ADCs possessing greater in vitro and in vivo stability. The project will be carried out in collaboration with AbbVie, Inc. (USA).

    During the course of the project, you will be trained in general and advanced methods for synthesis and catalysis, including (where necessary) preparation and handling of air- and moisture-sensitive compounds. Analytical training will be focused on the characterization of new compounds, intermediates and materials using a range of techniques including NMR (solution and solid-state) and IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry and HPLC. Training in chemical biology methods will also be part of the project training.

    The Department of Chemistry has superb analytical facilities, supporting training using a diverse array of equipment including NMR (solution and solid-state) and IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, Raman spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and gel-permeation chromatography. There is also access to departmental, institutional and regional HPC facilities. 

    Requirements

    Applicants will hold, or expect to receive, a 1st class or 2:1 UK Masters-level or BSc degree (or equivalent) in Chemistry and possess theoretical and practical skills commensurate with the undergraduate degree programme. The successful candidate will demonstrate a strong interest in synthetic organic chemistry, enthusiasm to work in a laboratory environment, willingness to learn, a collaborative attitude, and will possess excellent written and oral communication skills.

    How to apply

    We encourage informal e-mail enquiries before submitting an application, to Professor Joe Sweeney (j.sweeney1@lancaster.ac.uk). Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system (http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply-for-postgraduate-study/). Applications will be considered in the order that they are received, and the position may be filled when a suitable candidate has been identified. Please indicate on your application that you are applying for this funded PhD project. 

    About Lancaster University

    The Department of Chemistry at Lancaster University provides a research environment that strongly supports the individual needs of each student, and promotes a healthy work–life balance. We are committed to the Athena Swan Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice undertaken to address gender equality in higher education and research. Our commitment to these principles is reflected in our recent receipt of an Athena Swan Bronze Award. The Department of Chemistry also operates an informal PhD peer-peer mentor scheme available to all students. 

    Funding details

    The studentships will cover fees at the UK/EU rate plus the standard maintenance stipend (£15,009 for 2019/20).

  • PhD Studentship in Electrochemical Surface Science of Inorganic Clusters on a 2-Dimensional Material

    A fully funded 3.5-year PhD studentship in the area of electrochemical surface science of inorganic clusters on a 2D material is available in the group of Dr Stijn (Stan) Mertens at the Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, commencing in October 2019.

    Background

    The research in our group focuses on establishing composition–structure–reactivity relationships of functional materials, for example catalysts, to arrive at an atomic scale understanding of their behaviour.  This goal is pursued by combining electrochemical measurements with atomic scale imaging under electrochemical conditions.  This understanding, in turn, is expected to unlock rational design of materials with unprecedented levels of catalytic performance, energy storage efficiency, etc.

    Project description

    Electrochemical reactions take place at the interface between an electronic and an ionic conductor.  In electrochemical surface science, we work with very well defined surfaces and interfaces that allow using techniques to reveal what is happening down to individual atoms and molecules.

    The aim of this PhD project is to explore the electrocatalytic activity of monodisperse tungsten(VI) oxide clusters immobilised on boron nitride nanomesh, an atomically thin insulator with unique properties. 

    In the course of this project, you will be trained in core electrochemical surface science and analytical techniques, and will have the opportunity to further your knowledge through regular group meetings and seminars. You will have access to advanced equipment, including a new electrochemical surface science laboratory, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy, and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry

    Requirements

    Applicants will hold, or expect to receive, a 1st class or 2:1 UK Masters-level or BSc degree (or equivalent) in Chemistry and possess theoretical and practical skills commensurate with the undergraduate degree programme. The successful candidate will demonstrate a strong interest in experimental physical chemistry, enthusiasm to work in a laboratory environment, willingness to learn, a collaborative attitude, and will possess excellent written and oral communication skills.

    How to apply

    We encourage informal e-mail enquiries before submitting an application, either to Dr Stijn Mertens (s.mertens@lancaster.ac.uk), or Dr Susannah Coote (s.coote@lancaster.ac.uk). Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system (http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply-for-postgraduate-study/). Applications will be considered in the order that they are received, and the position may be filled when a suitable candidate has been identified. Please indicate on your application that you are applying for this funded PhD project. 

    About Lancaster University

    The Department of Chemistry at Lancaster University provides a research environment that strongly supports the individual needs of each student, and promotes a healthy work–life balance. We are committed to the Athena Swan Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice undertaken to address gender equality in higher education and research. Our commitment to these principles is reflected in our recent receipt of an Athena Swan Bronze Award. The Department of Chemistry also operates an informal PhD peer-peer mentor scheme available to all students. 

    Funding Details

    The studentships will cover fees at the UK/EU rate plus the standard maintenance stipend (£15,009 for 2019/20).

Self-Funded Opportunities

The Chemistry Department currently has several self-funded postgraduate opportunities.

  • Interlocked Molecules as Receptors of Challenging Ionic Guests

    A PhD project for self-funded students in synthetic supramolecular chemistry is available under the supervision of Dr Nicholas Evans at the Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University.

    The binding and sensing of ionic species are important for a range of biomedical, environmental and industrial reasons. However, the study of ionic recognition to date has largely focused on the binding and sensing of relatively simple targets such as metal cations and achiral inorganic anions. The preparation of receptor molecules, capable of the recognition of more challenging targets, such as ion pairs or chiral polyatomic anions, presents an exciting challenge to the supramolecular chemist.

    The project being advertised here will involve the design, synthesis and study of novel rotaxanes or catenanes that will act as selective hosts of such challenging ionic guest targets. The project will involve rationally designed synthesis to construct the rotaxanes and analytical experiments to determine their ion binding affinities. The student will receive training and gain expertise in both of these areas of practical scientific investigation.

    Enthusiasm to work in a laboratory environment, the ability to learn (by tuition and independently) and possession of excellent written and oral communication skills are essential.

    Applicants should hold, or expect to receive, a 1st class or good 2:1 UK Masters-level degree (or equivalent) in Chemistry. They must possess synthetic and analytical chemistry skills that would be expected of a graduate with a 1st class or good 2:1 UK Masters-level degree in Chemistry. If the applicant’s first language is not English, an IELTS score of 6.5 (or equivalent) is also required. Applications should be made via Lancaster University’s online application system. Informal email enquiries prior to making an application are encouraged.

    For further information on the research of Dr Nicholas Evans, see here.

    The Chemistry Department operates a research student mentor programme. One of our current student mentors will be available to answer any of your questions about life and studying in our Department throughout the application stage and during your research degree at Lancaster.

    The Chemistry Department particularly welcomes applications from women. We are committed to flexible working on an individual basis, we welcome and embrace diversity, and are committed to the Athena SWAN principles.

    The Department is the holder of the Athena Swan Bronze Award.

  • The Catalytic Enantioselective Construction of All-Carbon Quaternary Centres

    Our research programme spans the broad area of synthetic organic chemistry and focuses on the development of new and efficient synthetic methodologies for the catalytic construction of novel molecular building blocks in an enantioselective manner. We are particularly interested in the development of new palladium-catalysed decarboxylative C–C bond formation processes as a means of generating structurally complex sp3-rich molecules to facilitate the drug discovery efforts in the pharmaceutical industry. The proposed PhD project will focus specifically on the catalytic enantioselective alkenylation of carbonyl compounds as a means of generating highly congested sp3 all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centres in an asymmetric fashion.

    It is well established that compounds lacking in structural complexity (sp2-rich) have a poorer track record of being developed into commercial pharmaceuticals than those which possess a more varied 3-D shape (sp3-rich). Towards this end, we have developed the first chemo- and regioselective palladium-catalysed decarboxylative alkenylation of 1,3-dicarbonyls with oxygen (Org. Lett. 2013, 15, 3778), nitrogen (J. Org. Chem., 2016, submitted) and carbon (Org. Lett. 2015, 17, 3926) nucleophiles. This process generates two new bonds and congested quaternary all-carbon centres in a single step. Owing to the efficiency of this approach, this PhD project will explore the use of chiral ligands for palladium to couple 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with a range of nucleophiles and install these chiral centres in an enantioselective fashion. The development of this methodology will allow us to access extensive classes of novel chiral building blocks as crucial intermediates for drug discovery.

    Enantioselective catalysis is a world-leading area of research in organic chemistry and the Department of Chemistry at Lancaster boasts state-of-the-art NMR, mass spectrometry and HPLC facilities to undertake this work. As such, you will be provided with excellent practical skills in synthetic chemistry as well as an in-depth knowledge of organic chemistry. If you are passionate about organic synthesis and are interested in working in our laboratory, do apply via the Lancaster Postgraduate Admissions website or e-mail me if you require further information.

  • The Enantioselective Synthesis of Novel Spirocyclic 3D Fragments

    Our research programme spans the broad area of synthetic organic chemistry and focuses on the development of new and efficient synthetic methodologies for the catalytic construction of novel molecular building blocks in an enantioselective manner. We are particularly interested in the development of new palladium-catalysed decarboxylative C–C bond formation processes as a means of generating structurally complex sp3-rich molecules to facilitate the drug discovery efforts in the pharmaceutical industry. The proposed PhD project will focus on the development of new methods for the synthesis of sp3-rich, structurally complex molecular building blocks as fragments for drug discovery.

    Fragment-based drug discovery is a mainstream approach for identifying small, less lipophilic molecules as starting points in drug discovery programmes. A fragment library populated with small, polar molecules, which are high in saturation (sp3-rich), can enable orientation-dependent growth and extension of fragments into pockets of an active site that might otherwise be inaccessible to planar aromatic fragments. Unfortunately, synthetic chemistry methodologies are biased towards the synthesis of aromatic compounds, which tend to be lipophilic, whereas sp3-rich and chiral molecules are under-represented. There is, therefore, high demand for small, polar, chiral, sp3-rich fragments, and reliable methodologies for their synthesis. As such, the aims of this PhD project will be two-fold: (a) to explore the enantioselective catalytic allylic alkylation reaction of 4-membered heterocycles; (b) to functionalise the resulting enantioenriched building blocks into a library of chiral and structurally complex 3-dimensional spirocyclic fragments for drug discovery.

    Enantioselective catalysis is a world-leading area of research in organic chemistry and the Department of Chemistry at Lancaster boasts state-of-the-art NMR, mass spectrometry and HPLC facilities to undertake this work. As such, you will be provided with excellent practical skills in synthetic chemistry as well as an in-depth knowledge of organic chemistry. If you are passionate about organic synthesis and are interested in working in our laboratory, do apply via the Lancaster Postgraduate Admissions website or e-mail me if you require further information.

  • Bioelectronic biomaterials for regenerative medicine (drug delivery and tissue engineering) and neuromodulation

    Applications are invited for a position in the lab of Dr John G. Hardy at the Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Institute at Lancaster University. Research in the Hardy group focuses on the development of organic electronic biomaterials which are an emerging class of materials that have the potential for application in regenerative medicine (drug delivery and tissue engineering) and as electrodes for recording or stimulating neural activity (i.e. neural interfaces for neuromodulation).

    Technological significance: Electromagnetic fields affect a variety of tissues (e.g. bone, muscle, nerve and skin) and play important roles in a multitude of biological processes (e.g. nerve sprouting, prenatal development and wound healing), mediated by subcellular level changes, including alterations in protein distribution, gene expression, metal ion content, and action potentials. This has inspired the development of electrically conducting devices for biomedical applications, including:

    • biosensors
    • drug delivery devices
    • cardiac/neural electrodes
    • tissue scaffolds

    It is noteworthy that there are a number of FDA-approved devices capable of electrical stimulation in the body, including cardiac pacemakers, bionic eyes, bionic ears and electrodes for deep brain stimulation; all of which are designed for long-term implantation. Polymers are ubiquitous in daily life, and conducting polymers (e.g. polyaniline, polypyrrole, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) have shown themselves to be both capable of electrically stimulating cells (e.g. stem cells) or the delivery of drugs. Furthermore, when implanted into small mammals (e.g. mice, rats and rabbits) their immunogenicities are similar to FDA-approved polymers such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), supporting their safety in vivo. These preclinical studies suggest that conducting polymer-based biomaterials are promising for clinical translation.

    Research in the Hardy group is inherently interdisciplinary and the student will learn:

    • Chemistry - synthesis (polymers/semiconducting molecules)
    • Materials Science - preparation of films, fibres, foams, gels, particulates, supramolecular materials, 3D printing; and their characterization (physicochemical, electrochemical, mechanical)
    • Biomedical applications (drug delivery, neuromodulation, tissue engineering)

    The student will utilise the facilities and expertise that exist at Lancaster University and may involve external collaborators (academia, charities, industry).

  • Development and application of advanced structural characterisation techniques using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Self-funded applicants are sought for a PhD studentship in the development and application of advanced structural characterisation techniques using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful probes of local structure in materials, giving unrivalled access to atomic-level information that can be difficult to obtain by standard analytical techniques. While NMR is routinely applied for the study of liquids, the study of solids is often more challenging owing to a variety of anisotropic nuclear spin interactions. However, using advanced experimental methodologies, it can be possible to gain detailed insight into a range of structural phenomena such as atomic disorder, defects, and ionic or molecular dynamics.

    The aim of this PhD project is to develop and apply new solid-state NMR techniques for the study of structure and function in technologically-relevant materials. The candidate will work with state-of-the-art experimental NMR facilities at Lancaster University, and also have the opportunity to travel to other facilities within the UK and abroad. In addition to experimental techniques, the project will also involve extensive use of computational codes for analysis of experimental data and the development of structural models. The candidate will also have the opportunity to become involved in NMR hardware development by designing and building NMR probe heads for the study of bulk materials and devices.

Scholarships and Funding

The University has committed £3.7m to scholarships and bursaries, with 400 students per year being entitled to these. Faculty scholarships cover your full tuition fees, as well as providing you with a generous stipend and access to a research training grant. Generous travel grants are also available, allowing you to attend conferences, workshops and seminars relevant to your PhD.