Experience the cutting edge of teaching and research with talk by experts

At our public lectures you will hear from outstanding speakers on diverse and fascinating subjects.

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Upcoming public lectures:

Closing the gap: tackling gender inequality in organisations

Date: Wednesday 30th January 2018
Time : 6.30pm to 8.00pm, doors open at 6pm
Venue: The Storey, Lancaster

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Event details

Despite significant advances in gender equality in the workplace, inclusive leadership still remains elusive. Research shows that women are paid over 9% less than men and are over-represented in junior roles, while men fail to benefit from family-friendly working practices.

In this lecture Dr Valerie Stead and Professor Claire Leitch explore these significant gender gaps: the gender pay gap, the leadership status gap and the family policy-practice gap. Drawing on contemporary events and their research, Claire and Valerie will show how these gaps combine to perpetuate deep-seated inequalities and the implications for the workplace.

Following on from the Gender Matters think-tank event organised by the Academy for Gender, Work and Leadership of Lancaster University Management School (LUMS) and the Work Foundation, and their presentation at an Industry and Parliamentary Trust Breakfast event “Mind the Gap: Decreasing Gender Inequalities in the UK workforce”, Dr Valerie Stead and Claire Leitch’s lecture takes another step towards progressing the agenda around these nationally and internationally significant issues. 

Read more about Dr Stead and Professor Leitch research gender gaps analytics in the Gender Matters Brochure.

This lecture is free to attend but registration is required, to register for your free tickets, please go to Eventbrite or contact the public events team at public-events@lancaster.ac.uk  or 01524 592 994.

‌About the speakers‌

Dr Valerie Stead is Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Management in LUMS and Director of the LUMS Academy for Gender, Work and Leadership. Motivated by the enduring global challenge of women’s under-representation in positions of power, her research focuses on how and why gender inequalities persist at work. 

Professor Claire Leitch is Professor of Entrepreneurial Leadership in LUMS. Her research concentrates on the development, enhancement and growth of leaders and their organizations. She has a particular interest in gender and understanding the underpinning reasons for the policy-practice gaps which perpetuate gender inequality in the workplace.

Breaking 2: physiological insights into the attempt to run a sub-2 hour marathon

Date: Thursday 4th April 2019
Time : 6.30pm to 8.00pm, doors open at 6pm
Venue: The Storey, Music Room, Lancaster

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Event Details

On 6th May, 2017, exactly 63 years after Sir Roger Bannister ran the first sub-4 min mile, three elite distance runners attempted the (almost) unthinkable: to run a 26.2 mile marathon in less than 2 hours. This event, performed at the Formula 1 racetrack in Monza, Italy, was the culmination of more than 2 years of scientific development work by Nike and its associates (including the presenter, Professor Andrew Jones).

There has been much speculation amongst sports scientists and the athletic community over whether a sub-2 hour marathon may be humanly possible (and, if so, when and how it might occur). In his presentation, Professor Jones will describe the physiological limitations to human endurance exercise performance and outline the strategy employed by the Nike team with regard to athlete selection and creation of the optimal conditions to make the sub-2 attempt viable. 

This will include information on the battery of laboratory and field-based physiological tests used to identify the athletes most likely to achieve the feat and insight into the consideration given to the environmental, training, course, pacing, drafting, biomechanical and nutritional factors that can impact marathon performance.  

This lecture is free to attend but registration is required, to register for your free tickets, please go to Eventbrite or contact the public events team at public-events@lancaster.ac.uk  or 01524 592 994.

About Professor Andrew Jones‌

Andrew Jones is Professor of Applied Physiology at the University of Exeter, UK, and is internationally recognized for his expertise in the following areas:

  • control of, and limitations to, skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism;
  • causes of exercise intolerance in health and disease;
  • respiratory physiology, particularly the kinetics of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation during and following exercise; and
  • sports performance physiology, particularly in relation to endurance athletics.

Professor Jones has authored more than 250 original articles and is co-Editor of three books; he is Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Sport Science, Associate Editor for Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise and serves on the Editorial Board of five other international journals in sports medicine and exercise science. He serves or has served as consultant physiologist to UK Athletics, the English Institute of Sport, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, and Nike Inc.

Darknet drug markets: in search of the bad guys

Date: Thursday 6th June 2019
Time : 6.30pm to 8.00pm, doors open at 6pm
Venue: The Storey, Auditorium, Lancaster

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Event details

While we have witnessed some important changes in dominant political and policy discourses around drug users in recent decades – as evidenced for example in the growth of harm reduction approaches – the myths, stereotypes and moral condemnation of drug suppliers have remained mostly unchallenged.

Cryptomarkets – aka ‘darknet’ drug markets – are online but ‘hidden’ marketplaces that allow drug sellers and buyers to transact anonymously yet in plain sight of law enforcement. To the extent that drug cryptomarkets are designed – and actually function – as self-regulating eco-systems, we are, arguably, encouraged to revisit policies and practices that cast drug supply activity as morally reprehensible and exclusively harm-producing; indeed, the eradicable cause of the 'drug problem’.

In this lecture, Professor Aldridge evaluates the relative harms and benefits of the online drug trade compared to traditional offline drug buying and selling. She explains why criminologists and policy makers should pay attention to cryptomarkets as an important criminal innovation.

Doors open at 6pm for tea and coffee, and the talk begins at 6.30pm with the opportunity to ask questions afterwards. 

To register for your free tickets, please go to Eventbrite or email public-events@lancaster.ac.uk for more details. 

About Professor Aldridge

Professor Judith Aldridge is Professor of Criminology in the School of Law at the University of Manchester. Her research is focused on drug markets, policy and use. Over the last five years she has pioneered research in the area of ‘virtual drug markets’, culminating in the first publication connected to drug sales on ‘Silk Road’.

She co-edited a special issue of the International Journal of Drug Policy. In connection to this work, she has acted in advisory/expert capacity to agencies including the Pompidou Group of the Council of Europe, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Abuse (EMCDDA), and the European Commission.

 

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Forensic anthropology in the real world

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Talking about Brexit - voices from before and after the referendum

17/10/2018 - Dr Veronika Koller, Lancaster University

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25/04/2018 - Dr Thaddeus Muller and Dr Gary Potter, Lancaster University

Anatomy Nights: Matters of the Heart

Anatomy Nights: Matters of the Heart

14/02/2018 Dr Adam Taylor, Lancaster University

The Politics of Fear: The Rise of Right-Wing Populist Politics

The Politics of Fear: The Rise of Right-Wing Populist Politics

8/02/2018 - Prof Ruth Wodak, Lancaster University

From Batman to the Walking Dead

From Batman to the Walking Dead

12/10/2017 - Charlie Adlard and Dr Andrew Tate, Lancaster University

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8/11/2017 - Prof David Croisdale-Appleby OBE, Durham University

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28/06/2017 - Prof Ian Chapman, UK Atomic Energy Authority

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17/01/2017 - Prof Paul Farley and Prof Paul Muldoon

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Predicting the Unpredictable: Statistics for Extremes

27/11/2016 - Prof Jonathan Tawn

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Unearthing the Private Writings of Sir Humphry Davy

27/10/2016 - Prof Sharon Ruston

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Ebola and the next pandemic threats

27/04/2016 - Dr Derek Gatherer

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Africa Rising!

21/04/2016 - Premier David Makhura, Gauteng City Region

The Hollywood History of Art

The Hollywood History of Art

22/03/2016 - Prof Sir Christopher Frayling

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How we talk about cancer and why it matters

26/01/2016 - Prof Elena Semino

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How can Companies be a Force for Good?

18/11/2015 - Andy Rubin and Dr Rodney Irwin

Defying Dementia: From Laboratory to Clinic

Defying Dementia: From Laboratory to Clinic

22/10/2015 - Prof David Allsop and Dr Penny Foulds

Food Glorious Food

Food Glorious Food

30/03/2015 - Prof Bill Davies OBE

Film and the Teaching of History

Film and the Teaching of History

11/03/2015 - Prof Jeffrey Richards

In the Digital Era - Do we still have privacy?

In the Digital Era - Do we still have privacy?

10/03/2015 - Lt Gen Prof Sir Edmund Burton, Prof Awais Rashid, Prof Nick Coleman, Dr Mike Short CBE, Prof Corrine May-Chahal

Bridging the Great Divide

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4/03/2015 - Rt. Hon Alan Milburn

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Scrap the Car to Save the Planet?

11/02/2015 - Prof Roger Kemp

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21/01/2015 - Prof Carolyn Jackson

Beyond the Lancashire Witches: Writing and Freedom

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27/11/2014 - Department of English and Creative Writing, Lancaster University

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3/11/2014 - Dame Esther Rantzen, Rt Hon Paul Burstow, Pam Creaven and Professor Christine Milligan

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18/09/2014 - Clare Amsel and The Very Reverend Dr John Hall

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24/06/2014 - Dame Barbara Monroe, Dr Catherine Walshe and Sue McGraw

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